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HMFO

P: n/a
Sorry if this is a stupid question, but I can't find anything on this
online - what does the
keyword "HMFO" do in javascript? It appears to be a link, but I don't see
how the alphanumeric
argument to it allows the browser to get anywhere. I'm asking because I'm
writing a screen-scraping
application and I don't know how to deal with this.
Sep 19 '06 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a

Jeff McKay wrote:
Sorry if this is a stupid question, but I can't find anything on this
online - what does the
keyword "HMFO" do in javascript? It appears to be a link, but I don't see
how the alphanumeric
argument to it allows the browser to get anywhere. I'm asking because I'm
writing a screen-scraping
application and I don't know how to deal with this.
There is no such keyword 'HMFO' in javascript. When you say it appears
to be a link, I'm assuming you're seeing something like the following:

<a href = "javascript: HMFO('...');"etc etc. </a>

It is using javascript pseudo-protocol followed by a function called
HMFO. When the link is clicked, it will invoke the method. However
javascript pseudo-protocol is a bad design, which you can find many
reason as to why by searching this newsgroup.

If that's not what you had meant, please provide a context as to go off
of.

Sep 19 '06 #2

P: n/a
You are correct - I am seeing the HMFO() inside a href. But I don't
understand what you
mean by "will invoke the method". What method? If I am the one parsing
this html page, what
do I do with this HMFO in order to find out where the link leads?

"web.dev" <we********@gmail.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@d34g2000cwd.googlegr oups.com...
>
Jeff McKay wrote:
Sorry if this is a stupid question, but I can't find anything on this
online - what does the
keyword "HMFO" do in javascript? It appears to be a link, but I don't
see
how the alphanumeric
argument to it allows the browser to get anywhere. I'm asking because
I'm
writing a screen-scraping
application and I don't know how to deal with this.

There is no such keyword 'HMFO' in javascript. When you say it appears
to be a link, I'm assuming you're seeing something like the following:

<a href = "javascript: HMFO('...');"etc etc. </a>

It is using javascript pseudo-protocol followed by a function called
HMFO. When the link is clicked, it will invoke the method. However
javascript pseudo-protocol is a bad design, which you can find many
reason as to why by searching this newsgroup.

If that's not what you had meant, please provide a context as to go off
of.

Sep 19 '06 #3

P: n/a
Nevermind my second question - I understand now - I just need to find the
HMFO() function
and substitute the argument given, in order to produce the actual href.

"web.dev" <we********@gmail.comwrote in message
news:11**********************@d34g2000cwd.googlegr oups.com...
>
Jeff McKay wrote:
Sorry if this is a stupid question, but I can't find anything on this
online - what does the
keyword "HMFO" do in javascript? It appears to be a link, but I don't
see
how the alphanumeric
argument to it allows the browser to get anywhere. I'm asking because
I'm
writing a screen-scraping
application and I don't know how to deal with this.

There is no such keyword 'HMFO' in javascript. When you say it appears
to be a link, I'm assuming you're seeing something like the following:

<a href = "javascript: HMFO('...');"etc etc. </a>

It is using javascript pseudo-protocol followed by a function called
HMFO. When the link is clicked, it will invoke the method. However
javascript pseudo-protocol is a bad design, which you can find many
reason as to why by searching this newsgroup.

If that's not what you had meant, please provide a context as to go off
of.

Sep 19 '06 #4

P: n/a

Jeff McKay wrote:
You are correct - I am seeing the HMFO() inside a href. But I don't
understand what you
mean by "will invoke the method". What method? If I am the one parsing
this html page, what
do I do with this HMFO in order to find out where the link leads?
Here's an example you can try out for yourself. Create a html page
with the following:

<html>
<head>
<title>test</title>

<script type = "text/javascript">
function HMFO()
{
alert("hello world");
}
</script>

</head>
<body>
<a href = "javascript: HMFO()">click me</a>
</body>
</html>

When I say it will invoke the method, I mean when you click on the
link, it will actually call the function, in this case HMFO. If you
are parsing this html page, you would have to find the associated
function and parse its statements. While you're doing so, you can
(attempt) to find where the link goes _if_ there is any statement that
does so. But as you can see in this example, the link doesn't
necessarily go anywhere.

Sep 19 '06 #5

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