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How to define a HTML page not allow scroll bars and resize?

RC
I know how to do this in JavaScript by

window.open("newFile.html",
"newTarget",
"scrollbars=no,resizable=0,width=200,height=20 0");

The browser will open a new window size 200x200, not allow resize and
no auto horizontal, vertical scrolling bars.

I am wonder can I do the similar inside a HTML file like

<html><head>
<meta pageSize=200x200, resize=no, scrollbars=no />
</head>
<body>
....
</body></html>

Can I do that?

Or do in CSS
html { height: 200; width: 200;
overflow-y: hidden; overflow-x: hidden; }

But how can you in CSS out side of the html tag?
Because the <styletag is between the html open/close tags.

Any idea?

Thank Q very much in advance!
Jul 26 '06
69 12856
Harlan Messinger wrote:
Haven't you noticed that the trend everywhere is to combine
functionality? Phones that are also PDAs and MP3 players and
cameras and Web browsers?
And of course... programmable.

--
Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact

Jul 28 '06 #51
Jack wrote:
Harlan Messinger wrote:
>However, if the washer's computer, and the oven's and the air
conditioner's, could be put on the household wireless network and
remotely drivable, that would be great.

I don't think it would. Or rather, while there is a marginal benefit in
being able to operate these machines remotely,
I dunno... if I'm on the train home from work, perhaps I think I'll bake
some bread to go with dinner; need to pre-heat the oven; take out my
mobile to phone the girlfriend and ask her to put the oven on to warm up;
phone's engaged; okay -- just SSH into the oven's embedded computer and
switch it on.

If I'd thought about it earlier in the day, I could have used a cron job.

--
Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact

Jul 28 '06 #52
On Fri, 28 Jul 2006 23:09:19 +0100, Toby Inkster
<us**********@tobyinkster.co.ukwrote:
>Jack wrote:
>Harlan Messinger wrote:
>>However, if the washer's computer, and the oven's and the air
conditioner's, could be put on the household wireless network and
remotely drivable, that would be great.

I don't think it would. Or rather, while there is a marginal benefit in
being able to operate these machines remotely,

I dunno... if I'm on the train home from work, perhaps I think I'll bake
some bread to go with dinner; need to pre-heat the oven; take out my
mobile to phone the girlfriend and ask her to put the oven on to warm up;
phone's engaged; okay -- just SSH into the oven's embedded computer and
switch it on.
Train delayed by landslide... girlfriend taking tea with the parson,
house burns down due to overheated oven.

Jim.
Jul 29 '06 #53
Joe
In article <ea**********@blue.rahul.net>, mc****@stanfordalumni.org
says...
>
Shift-click (or shift-enter) works in many browsers (and browser-like OS
components). I've grown fond of Opera's Ctrl-Shift-click, which opens the
link in a background tab.
Middle-click. You'd be surprised how many folks don't know you can click
the wheel.
Jul 29 '06 #54
Gazing into my crystal ball I observed Harlan Messinger
<hm*******************@comcast.netwriting in news:4iujmmF5iaboU1
@individual.net:
That's an absurdity. A washing machine can't be carried around with you
along with your word processing, e-mail, web browsing, music listening,
photographing, etc. capabilities.
But, you can carry all that with you to do the laundry, have an espresso
and catch a movie if you live in San Francisco.
>
However, if the washer's computer, and the oven's and the air
conditioner's, could be put on the household wireless network and
remotely drivable, that would be great.
And the washer would put it's own clothes in, and the oven would put the
stuffed chicken in, and the A/C would slap your hand if you tried to turn
it off.

Wait a minute... aren't those Rosie's jobs?

--
Adrienne Boswell at Home
Arbpen Web Site Design Services
http://www.cavalcade-of-coding.info
Please respond to the group so others can share

Jul 29 '06 #55
Gazing into my crystal ball I observed Joe <jo********@yahoo.com.au>
writing in news:MP************************@news.aardvark.net. au:
Middle-click. You'd be surprised how many folks don't know you can click
the wheel.

If you have a wheel.

--
Adrienne Boswell at Home
Arbpen Web Site Design Services
http://www.cavalcade-of-coding.info
Please respond to the group so others can share

Jul 29 '06 #56
In message <Xn****************************@69.28.186.121>, Adrienne
Boswell <ar****@yahoo.comwrites
>the A/C would slap your hand if you tried to turn it off.
s/off/on/

Better for the planet, that way!
--
Andy Mabbett
Say "NO!" to compulsory ID Cards: <http://www.no2id.net/>

Free Our Data: <http://www.freeourdata.org.uk>
Jul 29 '06 #57
In message <MP************************@news.aardvark.net.au >, Joe
<jo********@yahoo.com.auwrites
>Middle-click. You'd be surprised how many folks don't know you can
click the wheel.
What wheel?
--
Andy Mabbett
Say "NO!" to compulsory ID Cards: <http://www.no2id.net/>

Free Our Data: <http://www.freeourdata.org.uk>
Jul 29 '06 #58
TC

Jack wrote:
The thing's driven by Java, XML and XSLT
I've had one experience marrying RSS + XML + XSLT + HTML + CSS. The
experience took 10 years off my life, I don't intend to do it again!
:-)

TC (MVP MSAccess)
http://tc2.atspace.com

Jul 29 '06 #59
Harlan Messinger wrote:
How is it convenient or simple for me to have SIX remote controls to
operate my video and audio components? It isn't. That's why I bought a
programmable universal remote.
Ditto. Then I replaced, one by one, those components
and can't find the instructions for the universal. :-)
However, if the washer's computer, and the oven's and the air
conditioner's, could be put on the household wireless network and
remotely drivable, that would be great.
Call me. I'll set that up for you for $200 per appliance.
(plus the cost of parts, i.e., electronic components)

--
Wes Groleau

Those who make peaceful revolution impossible
will make violent revolution inevitable.
-- John F. Kennedy
Jul 29 '06 #60
Joe wrote:
You'd be surprised how many folks don't know you can click the wheel.
What wheel? A wheel would get in the way on my pointing device. You don't
need a wheel to be able to middle-click.

--
Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact

Jul 30 '06 #61
Els
Toby Inkster wrote:
Joe wrote:
>You'd be surprised how many folks don't know you can click the wheel.

What wheel? A wheel would get in the way on my pointing device. You don't
need a wheel to be able to middle-click.
Yes, but people with 3 buttons[1] would probably figure the middle one
was clickable. Those with a wheel instead of a middle button might not
think it so obvious :-)

[1] Just in case of any confusion, I mean people who use a pointing
device in the form of a mouse which has 3 buttons. Not people with 3
buttons on them.

--
Els http://locusmeus.com/
accessible web design: http://locusoptimus.com/
Jul 30 '06 #62
Joe
In article <zQ**************@pigsonthewing.org.uk>, usenet200309
@pigsonthewing.org.uk says...
In message <MP************************@news.aardvark.net.au >, Joe
<jo********@yahoo.com.auwrites
Middle-click. You'd be surprised how many folks don't know you can
click the wheel.

What wheel?
In the Windows world, mouses typically come with a wheel mounted between
the left and right buttons. This wheel is used to scroll up and down the
screen, but can also be clicked. Many Windows users, even long-time
users, do not know this.
HTH, HAND.

Jul 31 '06 #63
Jim Ley wrote:
Train delayed by landslide... girlfriend taking tea with the parson,
house burns down due to overheated oven.
Your oven doesn't have a thermostat?

--
Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact

Jul 31 '06 #64
Toby Inkster said the following on 7/31/2006 3:41 AM:
Jim Ley wrote:
>Train delayed by landslide... girlfriend taking tea with the parson,
house burns down due to overheated oven.

Your oven doesn't have a thermostat?
It's in the broken browser script built into the programmable refrigerator.

--
Randy
comp.lang.javascript FAQ - http://jibbering.com/faq & newsgroup weekly
Javascript Best Practices - http://www.JavascriptToolbox.com/bestpractices/
Jul 31 '06 #65
In <ea**********@news.nems.noaa.govon Wed, 26 Jul 2006 16:17:36
-0400, RC <ra**********@nospam.noaa.govwrote:
>they can only see
what I allow them to see
And another successful graduate from the Basil Fawlty School of
Web Authoring.

--
DG
Jul 31 '06 #66
In article <ea**********@news.nems.noaa.gov>,
RC <ra**********@nospam.noaa.govwrote:
>OK, I just found other way to fooling the browser by used frames

<frameset rows="10%,*">
<frame src="clicklink.html" name="content" scrolling="no" noresize>
<frame name="display" scrolling="no" noresize>
</frameset>

So in my clicklink.html

<a href="newFile.html" target="display">New File</a>

Now, when an user click the link "New File", they can only see
what I allow them to see, no scrolling bars, no resize frames.
Fortunately, it's trivial to defeat those restrictions with the
Proxomitron. I never browse without it.

-A
Jul 31 '06 #67
RC wrote:
I know how to do this in JavaScript by

window.open("newFile.html",
"newTarget",
"scrollbars=no,resizable=0,width=200,height=20 0");

The browser will open a new window size 200x200, not allow resize and
no auto horizontal, vertical scrolling bars.

I am wonder can I do the similar inside a HTML file like

<html><head>
<meta pageSize=200x200, resize=no, scrollbars=no />
</head>
<body>
...
</body></html>

Can I do that?

Or do in CSS
html { height: 200; width: 200;
overflow-y: hidden; overflow-x: hidden; }

But how can you in CSS out side of the html tag?
Because the <styletag is between the html open/close tags.

Any idea?

Thank Q very much in advance!
What I understand from your question is that you want to launch a new
window for a Web page with a fixed window size and no scroll bars. Is
that correct?

If so, note the following. I use SeaMonkey (but Firefox and Camino have
the same or similar capabilities). I use tabbed browsing. If a link on
a Web page attempts to launch a new window, it merely launches a new tab
within my existing window. Since it is my existing window, the window
size does not change; and the scroll bars remain. Further, the menu
bar, all my toolbars, and any status or other display zones remain
operative.

You will be going through a lot of effort to seize control of my
browser, but my browser will defeat that effort and leave me in control.

--

David E. Ross
<http://www.rossde.com/>

Concerned about someone (e.g., Pres. Bush) snooping
into your E-mail? Use PGP.
See my <http://www.rossde.com/PGP/>
Aug 2 '06 #68
RC
David E. Ross wrote:
>
What I understand from your question is that you want to launch a new
window for a Web page with a fixed window size and no scroll bars. Is
that correct?
Yes, correct.
I would like let users change window size and scroll up/down,
left/right. But all browsers implemented the <tableare suck!

When you have a LARGE/BIG <table>, 1. you want the header row (top row)
remain on the top when you scroll the vertical scrolling bar.

Similar, 2. you want the left column remain on the left when you scroll
the horizontal scrolling bar.

I have been tried to do 1. and 2. for few months. So far I success on 1.
by used CSS

tbody.maintable { overflow-y: scroll; height: 35em; overflow-x: scroll;
width: 40em; }

By this I can limit the table height in 35em. But the browser window
override the width, made the window very wide. I also tried

<table width="80%"still no luck.

Therefore, I give up this. I came up my own way to handle a LARGE/BIG
<table>. Let user doing up/down, left/right meet the requirement 1. and 2.

You will be going through a lot of effort to seize control of my
browser, but my browser will defeat that effort and leave me in control.

Try this link, I know you can still resize the window size.
I hope you can not resize the <frame>
I tested it works well in FF (Firefox) and NS (Netscape), not quite well
in IE.

http://amazon.nws.noaa.gov/hads/test/frametable.html

Any new idea help me improve? Meet the requirement 1. and 2.?
Aug 2 '06 #69
RC wrote:
David E. Ross wrote:
>>
What I understand from your question is that you want to launch a new
window for a Web page with a fixed window size and no scroll bars. Is
that correct?

Yes, correct.
I would like let users change window size and scroll up/down,
left/right. But all browsers implemented the <tableare suck!

When you have a LARGE/BIG <table>, 1. you want the header row (top row)
remain on the top when you scroll the vertical scrolling bar.

Similar, 2. you want the left column remain on the left when you scroll
the horizontal scrolling bar.

I have been tried to do 1. and 2. for few months. So far I success on 1.
by used CSS

tbody.maintable { overflow-y: scroll; height: 35em; overflow-x: scroll;
width: 40em; }

By this I can limit the table height in 35em. But the browser window
override the width, made the window very wide. I also tried

<table width="80%"still no luck.

Therefore, I give up this. I came up my own way to handle a LARGE/BIG
<table>. Let user doing up/down, left/right meet the requirement 1. and 2.

>You will be going through a lot of effort to seize control of my
browser, but my browser will defeat that effort and leave me in control.


Try this link, I know you can still resize the window size.
I hope you can not resize the <frame>
I tested it works well in FF (Firefox) and NS (Netscape), not quite well
in IE.

http://amazon.nws.noaa.gov/hads/test/frametable.html

Any new idea help me improve? Meet the requirement 1. and 2.?
When I selected the link in your message, a new browser window was
launched (per my options). I did not see a recognizable frame.
However, my browser did indicate frames. The window had no scrollbars,
but I could scroll using my keyboard arrows as well as my PageUp and
PageDown keys. I used my browser's capability to relaunch the frame in
a new tab. Then I had scroll bars.

I got similar results when I copied the link's URL and pasted it into
the address bar of a tab in my original browser window.

Aha! I now understand not only what you want but why. If this task
were mine, I would implement it in an Excel spreadsheet with the top row
and left column frozen. Then the headers in the top row would "stick"
to their columns but always be on top while the labels in the left
column would "stick" to their rows but always at at the left. Then I
would upload the spreadsheet to the Web server and provide a link to it
in my Web page. Of course, this would limit my audience to only those
who can view an Excel spreadsheet.

On the other hand, I believe there is a capability for scrollable
windows within a Web page. This would allow you to put the header row
just above such a window and the contents within the window, which would
have a vertical scrollbar. However, I don't know how to do this, having
never needed it. Also, I'm not sure you can put such a window within
another window so that you can have both a header row and a index column.

--

David E. Ross
<http://www.rossde.com/>

Concerned about someone (e.g., Pres. Bush) snooping
into your E-mail? Use PGP.
See my <http://www.rossde.com/PGP/>
Aug 3 '06 #70

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