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IE jpeg preloading problem

P: n/a
Hi All,

I need some help resolving a pretty tricky problem. I have a javascript
application running from a CD. The script preloads between 500 to 1000
jpegs (about 40K each) to the IE. The IE immediatly decompresses the
jpegs, essentially using up too much memory.

I have a few limitations working against me:
A) Since the jpegs reside on a CD, it is crucial that I preload them to
the IE in order to not incur the seek time that is needed when the user
wishes to view the jpeg.
B) This is not a slide show, the user has to be able to view the
different jpegs when he wants to and will not wait the full second that
will be needed to load them. It is only possible to wait when the
script loads.

Is anyone familiar with a way to preload the images without the IE
decompressing them immediatly? By the way Netscape seems not to have
problems like that...

Apr 26 '06 #1
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3 Replies


P: n/a
giladg22 wrote:
Hi All,

I need some help resolving a pretty tricky problem. I have a javascript
application running from a CD. The script preloads between 500 to 1000
jpegs (about 40K each) to the IE. The IE immediatly decompresses the
jpegs, essentially using up too much memory.

I have a few limitations working against me:
A) Since the jpegs reside on a CD, it is crucial that I preload them to
the IE in order to not incur the seek time that is needed when the user
wishes to view the jpeg.
B) This is not a slide show, the user has to be able to view the
different jpegs when he wants to and will not wait the full second that
will be needed to load them. It is only possible to wait when the
script loads.

Is anyone familiar with a way to preload the images without the IE
decompressing them immediatly? By the way Netscape seems not to have
problems like that...


Hi,

Long ago when I made CD's on websites I had excactly the same problem.

Disclaimer: I can describe you how I THINK how I solved it then, but I am
unsure if that still works. I am even unsure if my memory serves me well,
but you can always try I guess. Your question was out here for 1 day now,
and nobody replied, so maybe try my simple sulotion.

The trick was very simple: Let the browser cache all the images first before
using them.
So what I did was this:
1) Create a welcomescreen, and a hidden frame.
2) In the hidden screen I placed ALL images that were on the cd.
3) (!) The headers in the hidden frames said that the document would expire
in a few years from now (2010 or something).

IE DID the caching, even when you re-used the CD later because it cached the
images from CD to HD.

Of course, the client must have cache enabled and it must be sufficient big.
Hope that helps you out.

Regard,
Erwin Moller
Apr 27 '06 #2

P: n/a
Thanks Erwin. I'll try that and post a reply when I'm done.

Gilad Grushka

Apr 27 '06 #3

P: n/a
giladg22 wrote:
I need some help resolving a pretty tricky problem. I have a javascript
application running from a CD. The script preloads between 500 to 1000
jpegs (about 40K each) to the IE. The IE immediatly decompresses the
jpegs, essentially using up too much memory.
YMMD.
I have a few limitations working against me:
A) Since the jpegs reside on a CD, it is crucial that I preload them to
the IE in order to not incur the seek time that is needed when the user
wishes to view the jpeg.
No, it is not. For "preloading" will not save you any time.
B) This is not a slide show, the user has to be able to view the
different jpegs when he wants to and will not wait the full second that
will be needed to load them. It is only possible to wait when the
script loads.
And they will dislike it even more when they have to wait n*1 seconds (n
being the number of images "preloaded") before they can even use the CD,
while the local cache is filled with images they probably never look at,
causing other data they require more often to be removed. Erwin's
certainly was worst advice possible.

Besides, if you have images that require a second to display on a current
machine in the first place, you have a greater problem. Use small
thumbnails. And *please* stop even thinking about messing with the
environment you have been allowed to use (not to misuse).
Is anyone familiar with a way to preload the images without the IE
decompressing them immediatly?
No. You are doing this the wrong way, trying to cure the symptoms.
By the way Netscape seems not to have problems like that...


Newer Netscapes (which is why it is important to tell at least the
version) do not have many flaws IEs have, as they are based on Gecko.

Please quote what you are replying to next time:

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PointedEars
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World War, 40 million people were killed. I think that if a third war
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-- Shakira, 2003-02-05 @ MTV.com
Apr 28 '06 #4

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