By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
435,640 Members | 2,355 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 435,640 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

Noob seeking very basic advice

P: n/a
I'm learning how to build a website. So far I've gotten pretty good
with HTML, CSS, and Paint Shop Pro, and I'm currenly learning the
basics of Javascript.

I'm hoping, eventually, to build and run an online publication that
will change content daily and have extensive archived articles,
cross-referenced by subject area(s).

What other languages would it make sense for me to learn? CGI, Perl,
PHP, Ajax, SQL are all Greek to me. I do have the teensiest grasp of
what XML is supposed to accomplish.

Also, I've hand-coded all my work so far. Do people who have a lot of
work use WYSIWYG editors (especially Dreamweaver) or is hand-coding
viable?

TIA.
Mason Barge

"If this is coffee, please bring me some tea. If this is tea, please bring me some coffee."
-- Abraham Lincoln

Jan 27 '06 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
4 Replies


P: n/a
Mason;

Learning web development is fun and useful. Before jumping right in
here is a couple of ideas of what the different languages are and do.

For the most part there are two main types of web languages server side
and client side. The difference is simple; "server side languages" aka
Middle-ware are ran on a web-server and "client side languages" are ran
on the local browser of the user.

Examples of Browser Side Scripting Languages:
Javascript, HTML, CSS, XSL, XML ( XML is can be used on both client and
browser sides )

Examples of Server Side Languages:
PHP, CGI, Coldfusion, XML

Examples of Database Management Systems:
MySql, MS Access, MS SQL

What is SQL? - SQL is a way of requesting data in the form of queries
from a DBMS ( Database Management System).

What is AJAX? - AJAX is a combination of server and client side
languages to form a way of requesting data with out refreshing the
browser. This is done by sending a hidden request to the server side
code and parsing what is sent back using client side code.

You have started in the right direction by first learning HTML. With
out knowledge of at least basic HTML learning any other languages for
the purpose of web development would be a step in the wrong direction.

What is your next step? - I would recommend moving on to PHP. PHP is a
widely used free based programming language. It is very easy to use and
a very powerful tool/skill to know.

As with any programming languages you must first learn the basic syntax
and data structures. Barnesandnoble have a line of 10.00 dollar books
on numerous languages including PHP and Javascript. These books are in
full color and are easy and fun to read. Whether you are a novice or a
advanced programmer these books are great and cheep!

In short here are the steps I would recomend for you to build your
blogger application:

1. Learn HTML
2. Learn PHP
3. Learn MySql using PHP
4. Plan your database table layout and flow
5. Create databases using phpMyAdmin ( free php MySql program for
creating / managing MySql databases )
6. Plan you program layout and flow
7. Start Coding

It might seem like a good bit of work. But after the first time it
seems to fly.

Hope this helps;

Daniel Boorn
Lead Programmer for Herald Hosting and DB Design

Jan 28 '06 #2

P: n/a
Mason Barge wrote:
I'm learning how to build a website. So far I've gotten pretty good
with HTML, CSS, and Paint Shop Pro, and I'm currenly learning the
basics of Javascript.
Sounds like a decent start
I'm hoping, eventually, to build and run an online publication that
will change content daily and have extensive archived articles,
cross-referenced by subject area(s).
Cool
What other languages would it make sense for me to learn? CGI, Perl,
PHP, Ajax, SQL are all Greek to me. I do have the teensiest grasp of
what XML is supposed to accomplish.
Actually, you would be surprised at how easy PHP and SQL can be - at
least to get the basics down. It's a bit OT here, but let me recommend
PHP 5 / MySQL Programming for the Absolute Beginner, by Andy Harris, to
get you started there.
Also, I've hand-coded all my work so far. Do people who have a lot of
work use WYSIWYG editors (especially Dreamweaver) or is hand-coding
viable?


I am the sole web developer for a multi-million dollar company that
builds web applications. I do all my coding by hand. So, yes, I'd say
it's certainly viable. Truth is, if I didn't do it by hand & chose to
rely on editors like FP or DW, I wouldn't have this job.

You may want to ask around in alt.www.webmaster as well - the focus of
that NG is a bit more broad - but I guarantee you that regarding the
last question, they will all agree that hand-coding is best.

Back on-topic - as you learn to use JavaScript & work with the DOM,
you'll find that hand-coding makes it easier to do what you want to do
with the page.

Jan 28 '06 #3

P: n/a
Mason Barge wrote:
I'm learning how to build a website. So far I've gotten pretty good
with HTML, CSS, and Paint Shop Pro, and I'm currenly learning the
basics of Javascript.

I'm hoping, eventually, to build and run an online publication that
will change content daily and have extensive archived articles,
cross-referenced by subject area(s).

What other languages would it make sense for me to learn? CGI, Perl,
PHP, Ajax, SQL are all Greek to me. I do have the teensiest grasp of
what XML is supposed to accomplish.
If you wish to develop a site, PHP and MySQL should be high on your
list. Id recommend O'Reilly book "Web Applications with PHP and MySQL".
Also, I've hand-coded all my work so far. Do people who have a lot of
work use WYSIWYG editors (especially Dreamweaver) or is hand-coding
viable?

I prefer to hand code. It's a matter of taste and to some extent,
style. I like minimal XHTML, which hand coding encourages :)
--
Ian Collins.
Jan 28 '06 #4

P: n/a
Thanks Daniel, Ian, and Tony, very much appreciate your help.
Mason Barge

"If this is coffee, please bring me some tea. If this is tea, please bring me some coffee."
-- Abraham Lincoln

Jan 29 '06 #5

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.