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Display image based on upcoming holiday

P: n/a
I have a web site which changes the header logo based on the upcoming
holiday.

For example, from December 10th to 25th, XMAS.JPG is displayed. From October
20th to 31st, HALLWEEN.JPG is displayed. Etc. etc. If today's date is not
near a holiday, then the default LOGO.JPG is displayed.

A while back, I was looking for a JavaScript that does this automagically.
But each snippet I found traditionally displays the default logo for a
second, then switches to the holiday logo. I had one years ago that
*instantly* displays the correct logo (but I misplaced it).

Can anybody point me to a more efficient JavaScript solution? Any help is
appreciated. Thanks!
Dec 31 '05 #1
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26 Replies


P: n/a
Yeah wrote:
I have a web site which changes the header logo based on the upcoming
holiday.

For example, from December 10th to 25th, XMAS.JPG is displayed. From October
20th to 31st, HALLWEEN.JPG is displayed. Etc. etc. If today's date is not
near a holiday, then the default LOGO.JPG is displayed.

A while back, I was looking for a JavaScript that does this automagically.
But each snippet I found traditionally displays the default logo for a
second, then switches to the holiday logo. I had one years ago that
*instantly* displays the correct logo (but I misplaced it).

Can anybody point me to a more efficient JavaScript solution? Any help is
appreciated. Thanks!


Do it on your server - create a copy of LOGO.JPG called BANNER.JPG (or
similar) then replace LOGO.JPG in your markup with BANNER.JPG.

Have a script run on your server each day (say at 5 minutes past
midnight) that copies the appropriate image to BANNER.JPG.

No client-side script and hopefully much more reliable. Users in
different time zones will see the changed banner at different local
times, but that doesn't seem important here.
A script based solution might be:
<img name="theBanner" src="LOGO.JPG">

<script type="text/javascript">

function changeBanner()
{
var nowDate = new Date();
var m = nowDate.getMonth()+1; // Months are zero-indexed - jan=0
var d = nowDate.getDate();
var bannerImg;

if (document.images && (bannerImg = document.images.theBanner)){

if (12 == m && (d>9 && d<26)){
bannerImg.src = 'XMAS.JPG';

} else if (10 == m && (d>19 && d<32)){
bannerImg.src = 'HALLWEEN.JPG';
}
}
}

</script>
But you are at the whim of client-side scripting and whether the
users' system has been set with an accurate date. You are probably
better off to put all your image names in lower case, but it's not
much of an issue.
--
Rob
Dec 31 '05 #2

P: n/a
Thanks for the prompt response! This seems like an excellent plan. Small
question: why is HALLWEEN.JPG an "else if" if the default non-holiday logo
is LOGO.JPG? It would appear to me that all holidays should be "if"s and the
default should be an "else if"...

"RobG" <rg***@iinet.net.auau> wrote in message
news:43**********************@per-qv1-newsreader-01.iinet.net.au...
Yeah wrote:
I have a web site which changes the header logo based on the upcoming
holiday.

For example, from December 10th to 25th, XMAS.JPG is displayed. From
October 20th to 31st, HALLWEEN.JPG is displayed. Etc. etc. If today's
date is not near a holiday, then the default LOGO.JPG is displayed.

A while back, I was looking for a JavaScript that does this
automagically. But each snippet I found traditionally displays the
default logo for a second, then switches to the holiday logo. I had one
years ago that *instantly* displays the correct logo (but I misplaced
it).

Can anybody point me to a more efficient JavaScript solution? Any help is
appreciated. Thanks!


Do it on your server - create a copy of LOGO.JPG called BANNER.JPG (or
similar) then replace LOGO.JPG in your markup with BANNER.JPG.

Have a script run on your server each day (say at 5 minutes past midnight)
that copies the appropriate image to BANNER.JPG.

No client-side script and hopefully much more reliable. Users in
different time zones will see the changed banner at different local times,
but that doesn't seem important here.
A script based solution might be:
<img name="theBanner" src="LOGO.JPG">

<script type="text/javascript">

function changeBanner()
{
var nowDate = new Date();
var m = nowDate.getMonth()+1; // Months are zero-indexed - jan=0
var d = nowDate.getDate();
var bannerImg;

if (document.images && (bannerImg = document.images.theBanner)){

if (12 == m && (d>9 && d<26)){
bannerImg.src = 'XMAS.JPG';

} else if (10 == m && (d>19 && d<32)){
bannerImg.src = 'HALLWEEN.JPG';
}
}
}

</script>
But you are at the whim of client-side scripting and whether the users'
system has been set with an accurate date. You are probably better off to
put all your image names in lower case, but it's not much of an issue.
--
Rob

Dec 31 '05 #3

P: n/a
Yeah wrote:
Thanks for the prompt response! This seems like an excellent plan. Small
question: why is HALLWEEN.JPG an "else if" if the default non-holiday logo
is LOGO.JPG? It would appear to me that all holidays should be "if"s and the
default should be an "else if"...


Please don't top-post. Trim quoted text and reply after the relevant
part.

If it's Christmas, there's no point in the 'if' going any further.
Using an else if is like putting a return in the first 'if' statement
to stop the second from being tested if the first is true - only one
condition can be true at a time.

There is no need for a default, since the default banner is loaded
anyway. Users without scripting will just see the default always.
[...]

A script based solution might be:
<img name="theBanner" src="LOGO.JPG">
Start loading the default banner.
[...]
if (document.images && (bannerImg = document.images.theBanner)){

if (12 == m && (d>9 && d<26)){
If the date is within the 'show XMAS image' time frame...

bannerImg.src = 'XMAS.JPG';
replace the default with the XMAS image.


} else if (10 == m && (d>19 && d<32)){
If we're not within the XMAS time frame, see if we're within the
Halloween time frame...

bannerImg.src = 'HALLWEEN.JPG';
if so, replace the default image with the Halloween image.

}
If not within either time frame, don't do anything - leave the default
banner alone.

}
}

</script>


[...]

--
Rob
Dec 31 '05 #4

P: n/a
Yeah wrote:
I have a web site which changes the header logo based on the upcoming
holiday.

For example, from December 10th to 25th, XMAS.JPG is displayed. From October
20th to 31st, HALLWEEN.JPG is displayed. Etc. etc. If today's date is not
near a holiday, then the default LOGO.JPG is displayed.

A while back, I was looking for a JavaScript that does this automagically.
But each snippet I found traditionally displays the default logo for a
second, then switches to the holiday logo. I had one years ago that
*instantly* displays the correct logo (but I misplaced it).

Can anybody point me to a more efficient JavaScript solution? Any help is
appreciated. Thanks!


I solved it by making a one-pixel transparent PNG and making that the
default. (This assumes that all the logos are the same size, and that
size is given, either by HTML or CSS.)

--
John W. Kennedy
"But now is a new thing which is very old--
that the rich make themselves richer and not poorer,
which is the true Gospel, for the poor's sake."
-- Charles Williams. "Judgement at Chelmsford"
Jan 1 '06 #5

P: n/a
JRS: In article <D8mtf.70439$sg5.44136@dukeread12>, dated Fri, 30 Dec
2005 20:37:29 local, seen in news:comp.lang.javascript, Yeah
<ye**@positive.net> posted :
I have a web site which changes the header logo based on the upcoming
holiday.

For example, from December 10th to 25th, XMAS.JPG is displayed. From October
20th to 31st, HALLWEEN.JPG is displayed. Etc. etc. If today's date is not
near a holiday, then the default LOGO.JPG is displayed.
Surely Halloween is not a holiday?

The Web is international; so, in order to avoid seeming stupid, you need
to use the client date rather than the server date or GMT.

Telling New Zealanders "Tonight is Halloween" at 2006-10-31 23:30 GMT,
while they're feeling it's nearly lunchtime on November 1st, is
ludicrous.

if the client has not got his date and time set correctly for his
locale, that's his problem; and it may indeed be well to indicate it.

Of course, if your message is "My (the author's) Halloween is not yet
over", then you need to use GMT, and to correct it to your personal
location (remembering, if you are alas an American, that Halloween 2006
will probably be your last to occur in early Winter time.
Can anybody point me to a more efficient JavaScript solution? Any help is
appreciated. Thanks!


If you are a programmer, you can find general and specific information,
but not necessarily a complete solution, at
<URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/js-dates.htm>
<URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/js-date6.htm>

--
© John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ?@merlyn.demon.co.uk Turnpike v4.00 IE 4 ©
<URL:http://www.jibbering.com/faq/> JL/RC: FAQ of news:comp.lang.javascript
<URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/js-index.htm> jscr maths, dates, sources.
<URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/> TP/BP/Delphi/jscr/&c, FAQ items, links.
Jan 1 '06 #6

P: n/a
Dr John Stockton said the following on 1/1/2006 9:16 AM:
JRS: In article <D8mtf.70439$sg5.44136@dukeread12>, dated Fri, 30 Dec
2005 20:37:29 local, seen in news:comp.lang.javascript, Yeah
<ye**@positive.net> posted :
I have a web site which changes the header logo based on the upcoming
holiday.

For example, from December 10th to 25th, XMAS.JPG is displayed. From October
20th to 31st, HALLWEEN.JPG is displayed. Etc. etc. If today's date is not
near a holiday, then the default LOGO.JPG is displayed.

Surely Halloween is not a holiday?


No more, and no less, than Christmas is. Your bias is painfully obvious.
The Web is international; so, in order to avoid seeming stupid, you need
to use the client date rather than the server date or GMT.
The OP said nothing about Server Time and was asking for a client
solution. That alone indicates using the client clock.
Telling New Zealanders "Tonight is Halloween" at 2006-10-31 23:30 GMT,
while they're feeling it's nearly lunchtime on November 1st, is
ludicrous.
So is telling Israeli's that "Tomorrow is Christmas" on December 24.
if the client has not got his date and time set correctly for his
locale, that's his problem; and it may indeed be well to indicate it.
The user does not always have access, nor inclination, to reset the
clock. Internet Cafe.
Of course, if your message is "My (the author's) Halloween is not yet
over", then you need to use GMT, and to correct it to your personal
location (remembering, if you are alas an American, that Halloween 2006
will probably be your last to occur in early Winter time.


That wasn't the question. It could have just as well been asked as an
"Upcoming Events" calendar and the solution is the same.

--
Randy
comp.lang.javascript FAQ - http://jibbering.com/faq & newsgroup weekly
Javascript Best Practices - http://www.JavascriptToolbox.com/bestpractices/
Jan 1 '06 #7

P: n/a
JRS: In article <7J******************************@comcast.com>, dated
Sun, 1 Jan 2006 13:02:07 local, seen in news:comp.lang.javascript, Randy
Webb <Hi************@aol.com> posted :
Dr John Stockton said the following on 1/1/2006 9:16 AM:
JRS: In article <D8mtf.70439$sg5.44136@dukeread12>, dated Fri, 30 Dec
2005 20:37:29 local, seen in news:comp.lang.javascript, Yeah
<ye**@positive.net> posted :
I have a web site which changes the header logo based on the upcoming
holiday.

For example, from December 10th to 25th, XMAS.JPG is displayed. From October
20th to 31st, HALLWEEN.JPG is displayed. Etc. etc. If today's date is not
near a holiday, then the default LOGO.JPG is displayed.

Surely Halloween is not a holiday?


No more, and no less, than Christmas is. Your bias is painfully obvious.


Christmas is a holiday throughout the Western world; I don't know
anywhere that has Halloween as a holiday. The normal meaning of holiday
is a no-work day.

The Web is international; so, in order to avoid seeming stupid, you need
to use the client date rather than the server date or GMT.


The OP said nothing about Server Time and was asking for a client
solution. That alone indicates using the client clock.


Agreed; but someone else favoured using Server Time or GMT.

Telling New Zealanders "Tonight is Halloween" at 2006-10-31 23:30 GMT,
while they're feeling it's nearly lunchtime on November 1st, is
ludicrous.


So is telling Israeli's that "Tomorrow is Christmas" on December 24.


Again an errant apostrophe. Actually, it's quite useful. Jerusalem and
Christianity are strongly linked, and Christmas is certainly celebrated
there. Granted, it is probably not a national Bank Holiday.

if the client has not got his date and time set correctly for his
locale, that's his problem; and it may indeed be well to indicate it.


The user does not always have access, nor inclination, to reset the
clock. Internet Cafe.


Then choose a better Cafe, or tell the manager.

Of course, if your message is "My (the author's) Halloween is not yet
over", then you need to use GMT, and to correct it to your personal
location (remembering, if you are alas an American, that Halloween 2006
will probably be your last to occur in early Winter time.

That wasn't the question.


No : it's an auxiliary answer. Often an OP does not understand the
possible complexities well enough to pose a question for which all that
should be said is a direct answer.

--
© John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ?@merlyn.demon.co.uk Delphi 3 Turnpike 4 ©
<URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/> TP/BP/Delphi/&c., FAQqy topics & links;
<URL:http://www.bancoems.com/CompLangPascalDelphiMisc-MiniFAQ.htm> clpdmFAQ;
<URL:http://www.borland.com/newsgroups/guide.html> news:borland.* Guidelines
Jan 2 '06 #8

P: n/a
Dr John Stockton wrote:
Christmas is a holiday throughout the Western world; I don't know
anywhere that has Halloween as a holiday. The normal meaning of holiday
is a no-work day.


Would you cavil at so designating Guy Fawkes Night?

--
John W. Kennedy
"But now is a new thing which is very old--
that the rich make themselves richer and not poorer,
which is the true Gospel, for the poor's sake."
-- Charles Williams. "Judgement at Chelmsford"
Jan 2 '06 #9

P: n/a
JRS: In article <UV*****************@fe12.lga>, dated Mon, 2 Jan 2006
17:36:34 local, seen in news:comp.lang.javascript, John W. Kennedy
<jw*****@attglobal.net> posted :
Dr John Stockton wrote:
Christmas is a holiday throughout the Western world; I don't know
anywhere that has Halloween as a holiday. The normal meaning of holiday
is a no-work day.


Would you cavil at so designating Guy Fawkes Night?


It's not even a day, let alone a holiday. It has none of the essential
properties of a holiday.

The Anniversary of the Battle of the Boyne is, however, a local holiday.

BTW, unless otherwise qualified, the term "holiday" means a no-work day
for the majority of the community. It can be qualified to indicate the
community, as in "family holiday" or "personal holiday" or "state
holiday".

--
© John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ?@merlyn.demon.co.uk Turnpike v4.00 MIME. ©
Web <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/> - w. FAQish topics, links, acronyms
PAS EXE etc : <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/programs/> - see 00index.htm
Dates - miscdate.htm moredate.htm js-dates.htm pas-time.htm holidays.htm etc.
Jan 3 '06 #10

P: n/a
Dr John Stockton said the following on 1/2/2006 9:46 AM:
JRS: In article <7J******************************@comcast.com>, dated
Sun, 1 Jan 2006 13:02:07 local, seen in news:comp.lang.javascript, Randy
Webb <Hi************@aol.com> posted :
Dr John Stockton said the following on 1/1/2006 9:16 AM:
JRS: In article <D8mtf.70439$sg5.44136@dukeread12>, dated Fri, 30 Dec
2005 20:37:29 local, seen in news:comp.lang.javascript, Yeah
<ye**@positive.net> posted :
I have a web site which changes the header logo based on the upcoming
holiday.

For example, from December 10th to 25th, XMAS.JPG is displayed. From October
20th to 31st, HALLWEEN.JPG is displayed. Etc. etc. If today's date is not
near a holiday, then the default LOGO.JPG is displayed.
Surely Halloween is not a holiday?


No more, and no less, than Christmas is. Your bias is painfully obvious.

Christmas is a holiday throughout the Western world; I don't know
anywhere that has Halloween as a holiday. The normal meaning of holiday
is a no-work day.


Then Christmas, in a WWW context, is not a 100% Holiday anymore than
Rhamadan, Hanukkah or Easter is. All of which are celebrated in the
"Western world" as you put it. Once again, your bias is obvious.
Telling New Zealanders "Tonight is Halloween" at 2006-10-31 23:30 GMT,
while they're feeling it's nearly lunchtime on November 1st, is
ludicrous.


So is telling Israeli's that "Tomorrow is Christmas" on December 24.

Again an errant apostrophe. Actually, it's quite useful. Jerusalem and
Christianity are strongly linked, and Christmas is certainly celebrated
there. Granted, it is probably not a national Bank Holiday.


OK, substitute the word Rhamadan for Christmas. The point is the same,
you just avoided it.

--
Randy
comp.lang.javascript FAQ - http://jibbering.com/faq & newsgroup weekly
Javascript Best Practices - http://www.JavascriptToolbox.com/bestpractices/
Jan 3 '06 #11

P: n/a
On Tue, 03 Jan 2006 16:48:28 +0000, Dr John Stockton wrote:
BTW, unless otherwise qualified, the term "holiday" means a no-work day
for the majority of the community. It can be qualified to indicate the
community, as in "family holiday" or "personal holiday" or "state
holiday".


Uh... I'm afraid I'm another one that has to disagree with you there.
Holiday means a day of some significance and has nothing to do with a day
off of work.

Your definition would be business and non-business days in these parts.

--

The USA Patriot Act is the most unpatriotic act in American history.

Jan 3 '06 #12

P: n/a
VK

Dr John Stockton wrote:
The Anniversary of the Battle of the Boyne is, however, a local holiday.


Still the idea that at St. Patrick's Day we would be all accused in a
mercifullless
killing of someone Dr John Stockton makes me all unhappy. The stout
gets too bitter of it.
Do we have any better alternatives? Any browing ideas?

Jan 3 '06 #13

P: n/a
Dr John Stockton wrote:
BTW, unless otherwise qualified, the term "holiday" means a no-work
day for the majority of the community.


If halloween isn't a holiday, then what do you call it?

--
Matt Kruse
http://www.JavascriptToolbox.com
http://www.AjaxToolbox.com
Jan 3 '06 #14

P: n/a
On Tue, 3 Jan 2006 13:25:19 -0600, "Matt Kruse"
<ne********@mattkruse.com> wrote:
Dr John Stockton wrote:
BTW, unless otherwise qualified, the term "holiday" means a no-work
day for the majority of the community.


If halloween isn't a holiday, then what do you call it?


Er. halloween?

Jim.
Jan 3 '06 #15

P: n/a
Matt Kruse wrote:
Dr John Stockton wrote:
BTW, unless otherwise qualified, the term "holiday" means a no-work
day for the majority of the community.

If halloween isn't a holiday, then what do you call it?

Hallowe'en?
Mick
Jan 3 '06 #16

P: n/a
Jim Ley wrote:
If halloween isn't a holiday, then what do you call it?

Er. halloween?


It has no classification? Along with Valentine's Day, St. Patrick's Day,
Mother's Day, Father's Day, etc, etc?

Using the definition for holiday as a non-work day leads to inconsistencies.
Is Martin Luther King's birthday a holiday? Many employees do not have to
work that day, but many do. Yet it's a "federal holiday" in the US. Many
stores are open on Christmas, and people need to work. Even though it's a
federal holiday, is it not a holiday for them?

I think most reasonable people lump all these together under the term
"holiday". If the govt recognizes it, it's a "federal holiday" but that
doesn't necessarily mean you will get the day off. If your employer gives
you the day off, then it's a "recognized holiday" or something similar.

Not that any of this really matters ;)

--
Matt Kruse
http://www.JavascriptToolbox.com
http://www.AjaxToolbox.com
Jan 3 '06 #17

P: n/a
On Tue, 3 Jan 2006 14:40:45 -0600, "Matt Kruse"
<ne********@mattkruse.com> wrote:
Jim Ley wrote:
If halloween isn't a holiday, then what do you call it? Er. halloween?


It has no classification? Along with Valentine's Day, St. Patrick's Day,
Mother's Day, Father's Day, etc, etc?


Not in en-GB that I can think of.
Using the definition for holiday as a non-work day leads to inconsistencies.
Is Martin Luther King's birthday a holiday?
That's not a holiday either, holiday really isn't used in this sense
(we define holiday as a break from usual routine often involving a
trip away), It's probably mostly understood as an American import
meaning just Christmas.

We use Bank Holiday for days which people generally have off, (but
that is used purely as a phrase)
I think most reasonable people lump all these together under the term
"holiday".


I'm pretty sure that's en-US usage. Wikipedia seems to agree
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holiday

Jim.
Jan 3 '06 #18

P: n/a
JRS: In article <11**********************@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups .com>
, dated Tue, 3 Jan 2006 11:04:47 local, seen in
news:comp.lang.javascript, VK <sc**********@yahoo.com> posted :

Dr John Stockton wrote:
The Anniversary of the Battle of the Boyne is, however, a local holiday.


Still the idea that at St. Patrick's Day we would be all accused in a

....

St Patrick's Day is March 17th. It provides a holiday in both parts of
Ireland (and, for all I know, in New York too).

The Anniversary of the Battle of the Boyne is July 12th, and provides a
holiday only in Northern Ireland.

You are confused, and have not used available data.

--
© John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ?@merlyn.demon.co.uk Turnpike v4.00 MIME. ©
Web <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/> - w. FAQish topics, links, acronyms
PAS EXE etc : <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/programs/> - see 00index.htm
Dates - miscdate.htm moredate.htm js-dates.htm pas-time.htm holidays.htm etc.
Jan 4 '06 #19

P: n/a
JRS: In article <uI********************@comcast.com>, dated Tue, 3 Jan
2006 13:36:52 local, seen in news:comp.lang.javascript, Randy Webb
<Hi************@aol.com> posted :
Dr John Stockton said the following on 1/2/2006 9:46 AM:

So is telling Israeli's that "Tomorrow is Christmas" on December 24.

Again an errant apostrophe. Actually, it's quite useful. Jerusalem and
Christianity are strongly linked, and Christmas is certainly celebrated
there. Granted, it is probably not a national Bank Holiday.


OK, substitute the word Rhamadan for Christmas. The point is the same,
you just avoided it.


Does the US really spell Ramadan like that? I've not noticed it in the
NYT extracts that I get involuntarily.

Ramadan will be important to Israelis; they share their land with
Muslims, as you may have heard. The Jews will not wish to celebrate it;
but they will wish to know when it happens (and predicting the month of
Ramadan on the Hebrew Calendar will be non-trivial).

It's also significant to tens of thousands of Koreans, whose local
ironmonger is quite frequently closed during Ramadan.
You seem to share the common US delusion of being able to speak and
write English.
Jim, Mick : "Pereant, inquit, qui ante nos nostra dixerunt." !

--
© John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ??*@merlyn.demon.co.uk Turnpike v4.00 MIME. ©
Web <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/> - FAQish topics, acronyms, & links.
Check boilerplate spelling -- error is a public sign of incompetence.
Never fully trust an article from a poster who gives no full real name.
Jan 4 '06 #20

P: n/a
VK

Dr John Stockton wrote:
Does the US really spell Ramadan like that?
Actually on place of <d> in "Ramadan" there is Arabic letter
representing a sound between English <th> in "the" and English <th> in
"Earth" (closer to the second one). Think of a German speaking good
English but still with a small accent - what would be nearly perfect
analogy (no offence to Germans - just an example).

So as close as possible spelling would actually be "Ramathan"; and this
is why in some languages this holiday spelled as "Ramazan".
You seem to share the common US delusion
of being able to speak and write English.


Illusions (not delisions) sweet up the life. :-)
But many people (including myself) like good British accent.
P.S. So much about Halloween. :-)
P.P.S. And no, I'm not Arab but I was working with Arab students.

Jan 4 '06 #21

P: n/a
Dr John Stockton said the following on 1/4/2006 12:39 PM:
JRS: In article <uI********************@comcast.com>, dated Tue, 3 Jan
2006 13:36:52 local, seen in news:comp.lang.javascript, Randy Webb
<Hi************@aol.com> posted :
Dr John Stockton said the following on 1/2/2006 9:46 AM:
So is telling Israeli's that "Tomorrow is Christmas" on December 24.
Again an errant apostrophe. Actually, it's quite useful. Jerusalem and
Christianity are strongly linked, and Christmas is certainly celebrated
there. Granted, it is probably not a national Bank Holiday.


OK, substitute the word Rhamadan for Christmas. The point is the same,
you just avoided it.

Does the US really spell Ramadan like that? I've not noticed it in the
NYT extracts that I get involuntarily.


Your pedantics get old John. And you are becoming extremely predictable.
You get corrected and you can't handle it so you either attack the
poster or you avoid the subject entirely.

Spell it as you wish. To be technically correct, there are three
translations of the word into English. You have two of the spellings, if
you want the third then spend some time searching for it. I am sure you
can find it.
Ramadan will be important to Israelis; they share their land with
Muslims, as you may have heard. The Jews will not wish to celebrate it;
but they will wish to know when it happens (and predicting the month of
Ramadan on the Hebrew Calendar will be non-trivial).
And what exactly does this have to do with you being wrong? Nothing.
It's also significant to tens of thousands of Koreans, whose local
ironmonger is quite frequently closed during Ramadan.
As it is to many non-Koreans. Again, what does this have to do with this
thread? Nothing.
You seem to share the common US delusion of being able to speak and
write English.


Ahhh, there is your typical ad hominem attack that you resort to when
you are wrong and don't want to admit it. That's fine. I can rest at
night knowing that if it were not for those "non English speaking
Americans" that you hate so much, you would be speaking German and we
wouldn't be having this conversation.

--
Randy
comp.lang.javascript FAQ - http://jibbering.com/faq & newsgroup weekly
Javascript Best Practices - http://www.JavascriptToolbox.com/bestpractices/
Jan 4 '06 #22

P: n/a
Dr John Stockton wrote:
....


You seem to share the common US delusion of being able to speak and
write English.
Jim, Mick : "Pereant, inquit, qui ante nos nostra dixerunt." !

“Pereant", inquit, "qui ante nos nostra dixerunt.”
[Confound those who have said our bright remarks before us.]
—Aelius Donatus

Mick
Jan 4 '06 #23

P: n/a
Dr John Stockton <jr*@merlyn.demon.co.uk> wrote:
The Anniversary of the Battle of the Boyne is July 12th, and provides a
holiday only in Northern Ireland.


And only for the protestants. The Catholics detest this anniversary.

--
Tim Slattery
Sl********@bls.gov
Jan 4 '06 #24

P: n/a
Dr John Stockton wrote:
Does the US really spell Ramadan ["Rhamadan"]?


Never in my experience, and as far as I know, there is no "rh" in Arabic
to justify it.

--
John W. Kennedy
"But now is a new thing which is very old--
that the rich make themselves richer and not poorer,
which is the true Gospel, for the poor's sake."
-- Charles Williams. "Judgement at Chelmsford"
Jan 4 '06 #25

P: n/a
JRS: In article <03*******************@twister.nyroc.rr.com>, dated
Wed, 4 Jan 2006 19:08:44 local, seen in news:comp.lang.javascript, mick
white <mi**@mickweb.com> posted :
Dr John Stockton wrote:

You seem to share the common US delusion of being able to speak and
write English. Jim, Mick : "Pereant, inquit, qui ante nos nostra dixerunt." !

“Pereant", inquit, "qui ante nos nostra dixerunt.”
[Confound those who have said our bright remarks before us.]
—Aelius Donatus


The punctuation no doubt depends on which printed source you use. The
Ancients did not use our punctuation. There's also the question of
whether you use the originator's version or the more commonly-cited
ancient citation.

--
© John Stockton, Surrey, UK. *@merlyn.demon.co.uk / ??*********@physics.org ©
Web <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/> - FAQish topics, acronyms, & links.
Correct <= 4-line sig. separator as above, a line precisely "-- " (SoRFC1036)
Do not Mail News to me. Before a reply, quote with ">" or "> " (SoRFC1036)
Jan 5 '06 #26

P: n/a
JRS: In article <0t********************************@4ax.com>, dated
Wed, 4 Jan 2006 16:19:05 local, seen in news:comp.lang.javascript, Tim
Slattery <Sl********@bls.gov> posted :
Dr John Stockton <jr*@merlyn.demon.co.uk> wrote:
The Anniversary of the Battle of the Boyne is July 12th, and provides a
holiday only in Northern Ireland.


And only for the protestants. The Catholics detest this anniversary.


The holiday is provided for all; it would no doubt be contrary to anti-
discrimination principles to offer a holiday only to protestants, or
even only to non-Catholics.

But I don't think many of the Catholics would insist, if job
circumstances permitted it, on working on that day; they seem to prefer
to use their free time to express that detestation more publicly.

--
© John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ?@merlyn.demon.co.uk DOS 3.3, 6.20; Win98. ©
Web <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/> - FAQqish topics, acronyms & links.
PAS EXE TXT ZIP via <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/programs/00index.htm>
My DOS <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/batfiles.htm> - also batprogs.htm.
Jan 5 '06 #27

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