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iFrames Page load

Hi,

I was wondering if anyone knew how to perform the following 2 tasks in
javascript:

1) distinguish between frames and iframes (during an onload event for
example)
2) figure out whether a container page has finished loading completely
with all its component frames or iframes (onload event is not useful
because we have more than one onload, and container page onload is not
always the last one for iframes).

Thanks,

-Adnan.

Jul 23 '05 #1
6 7066
In article <11*********************@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups. com>, adnanx82
@gmail.com enlightened us with...
Hi,

I was wondering if anyone knew how to perform the following 2 tasks in
javascript:

1) distinguish between frames and iframes (during an onload event for
example)
Depends.
Checking from where, the window itself or a containing window?
Generally, you can't tell, but you might be able to fudge it by checking
getElementsByTagName and putzing around.
2) figure out whether a container page has finished loading completely
with all its component frames or iframes (onload event is not useful
because we have more than one onload, and container page onload is not
always the last one for iframes).


I can't think of a way, other than having every child and the container set
variables when they load, then checking those variables.
A hack, basically. Not pretty.

--
--
~kaeli~
Practice safe eating - always use condiments.
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/wildAtHeart
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/kaelisSpace

Jul 23 '05 #2
>>2) figure out whether a container page has finished loading completely
with all its component frames or iframes (onload event is not useful
because we have more than one onload, and container page onload is not
always the last one for iframes).

I can't think of a way, other than having every child and the container set
variables when they load, then checking those variables.
A hack, basically. Not pretty.


I don't know if this works for Mozilla or Opera, but using IE, you could
check the readyState of the (i)frames contained in your main window:

<html>
<head>
<script>
Globals={
checkReadyState:function() {
for (var f=0; f<document.frames.length; f++) {
frame = document.frames(f);
while (frame.document.readyState!="complete") {
status+="."; // just wait ...
}
}
}
};
</script>
</head>
<body onload="Globals.checkReadyState();">
<iframe src="test.html">
<iframe src="test.html">
<iframe src="test.html">
<iframe src="test.html">
</body>
</html>
Jul 23 '05 #3
ad******@gmail.com wrote:
1) distinguish between frames and iframes (during an onload event for
example)
Unclear what the reference point is on this, but if the i/framed window
is wondering (and it's not a cross domain situation), what about:
window.frameElement.nodeName
2) figure out whether a container page has finished loading completely
with all its component frames or iframes (onload event is not useful
because we have more than one onload, and container page onload is not
always the last one for iframes).


One approach is to have a variable at the top level which each loaded
frame increments (in its onLoad routine). When all frames have
loaded, then the variable's value will equal the number of i/frames
(which each onLoad routine is, of course, checking for. In that
event, the top.everybodyLoaded routine can kick off). The post below
illustrates this for the two i/frame case (the variant at the bottom
is closer to what I'm talking about here).
http://groups-beta.google.com/group/...71708cb459e632

Good luck,
Csaba Gabor from Vienna.
Jul 23 '05 #4
Csaba Gabor wrote:
ad******@gmail.com wrote:
2) figure out whether a container page has finished loading completely
with all its component frames or iframes (onload event is not useful
because we have more than one onload, and container page onload is not
always the last one for iframes).


One approach is to have a variable at the top level which each loaded
frame increments (in its onLoad routine). When all frames have
loaded, then the variable's value will equal the number of i/frames
(which each onLoad routine is, of course, checking for. In that
event, the top.everybodyLoaded routine can kick off). The post below
illustrates this for the two i/frame case (the variant at the bottom
is closer to what I'm talking about here).
http://groups-beta.google.com/group/...71708cb459e632


Here's a concrete example that I put together on FF 1.0 / IE 6
that checks whether all the frames are loaded (but not for the
container page being loaded).

<html><head><title>Multiload Test</title>
<script type='text/javascript'>
loadCount = 0;
function everybodyLoaded() {
alert("Number of frames loaded: " +
window.frames.length); }
</script>
</head><body>
<iframe src="javascript:'<body onload=&quot;
alert(&amp;#34;I\'m a/n &amp;#34;+
window.frameElement.tagName);
if (++parent.loadCount==
parent.frames.length) parent.setTimeout(parent.
everybodyLoaded,0)&quot;>Frame 1</body>'">
</iframe>
<iframe src="javascript:'<body onload=&quot;
if (++parent.loadCount==
parent.frames.length) parent.setTimeout(parent.
everybodyLoaded,0)&quot;>Frame 2</body>'">
</iframe>
</body>
<html>
Also, it is (I think) instructive to see what happens
if you replace the two lines starting with 'alert' in
the main body (in other words, lines 10 and 11) with
the following 3 lines:

window.setTimeout(&amp;#34;alert(
\\&amp;#34;I\'m a/n \\&amp;#34;+
window.frameElement.tagName)&amp;#34;,0);

In this case, the alert does not hold up processing until
the onLoad of IFrame 1 has finished (by the alert being
responded to). Rather, that onLoad finishes along with
the others so that everybodyLoaded can run.

In IE6, the alert from everybodyLoaded (run from the onLoad
of IFrame 2) must be dismissed before the alert for IFrame 1
(pending from the setTimeout) will run.

However, in FF 1, both alerts will be shown, the IFrame 1
alert on top of the everybodyLoaded alert.

Csaba Gabor from Vienna
Jul 23 '05 #5
In article <42*********************@read.news.be.uu.net>, je*@fernbach.com
enlightened us with...

I don't know if this works for Mozilla or Opera, but using IE, you could
check the readyState
MSIE only http://msdn.microsoft.com/workshop/a...adystate_1.asp

Standards Information
There is no public standard that applies to this property.

--
--
~kaeli~
A lot of money is tainted - It taint yours and it taint mine.
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/wildAtHeart
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/kaelisSpace

Jul 23 '05 #6
Thanks for your replies. Keeping a count of frames loaded works if the
frames are produced statically in the html. However, if there is
javascript code that generates frames dynamically, we don't know for
sure what the number of frames would be in the frames array when the
onLoad event is called for a particular frame (There might still be
more frames being added to the document).

I think setting variables in each frames window and container window
when that window's onLoad event fires might work. After setting the
variable, it could go through all the frames in the top window and if
all of them have the variable set to true, then we know that that
onLoad was the last onLoad and the page (with all the component
windows) has finished loading. However, again, I am not sure what the
implication is on pages which dynamically generate frames or iframes
using document.write()...Will this work all the time? Is it possible
that all the frames in the frames array and the container page have
finished loading but there still other frames that are just about to be
added?

In case you're wondering, I'm writing a generic solution, so I don't
know about the structure of the pages and would like to have a generic
way of figuring out the completion of the load for a container page
along with all of its component frames/iframes.

Thanks very much for your help everyone.

-Adnan.

Jul 23 '05 #7

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