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OT anyone know iterative quicksort?

just paste the below into notepad, call it iqsort.html double click it
and your IE browser will run it. (neat! a universal programming
language we can all run!)

it falls out from the sort procedure. I got javascript quicksort
running, it's quick but it gets stack overflow after about 5000
elements.

Am I passing the array as a parameter alright? I think javascript
default is to pass pointers, that can be global.

Herc


<script language = "javascript">

l=0
r=0
stack=0
stuck = new Array
ARRAY_MAX = 10

function PUSH(l, r) {
stack++
stuck[stack] = l
stack++
stuck[stack] = r
}
function POP(l, r) {
r = stuck[stack]
stack--
l = stuck[stack]
stack--
}

function main()
{
i = 0
array1 = new Array
array2 = new Array

alert("The array is composed of the following values")

for(i=0; i<ARRAY_MAX; i++) {
array1[i] = parseInt(Math.random(1) * 100)
array2[i] = array1[i]
}

alert (array1[1] + " " + array1[2] + " " + array1[3] + " " +
array1[4] + " " + array1[5])

iterative_qsort(array2, 0, ARRAY_MAX-1);

alert (array2[1] + " " + array2[2] + " " + array2[3] + " " +
array2[4] + " " + array2[5])

}
function iterative_qsort(tarray, left, right)
{

i=0
last=0
temp=0
position=0

if(left < right) {

/* Push -1's onto the stack as a signal to us in the
future that we've reached the bottom. */

PUSH(-1, -1);
PUSH(left, right);

finished = false
while (!finished) {

POP(left, right);

if((left == -1) && (right == -1)){
finished = true
}
else {

if(left < right) {
position = parseInt((left + right) / 2)

temp = tarray[left];
tarray[left] = tarray[position];
tarray[position] = temp;

last = left;

for(i=left+1; i<=right; i++)
if(tarray[i] < tarray[left]) {
last++;
temp = tarray[last];
tarray[last] = array[i];
tarray[i] = temp;
}

temp = tarray[left];
tarray[left] = tarray[last];
tarray[last] = temp;

PUSH(left, last-1);
PUSH(last+1, right);
}
}
}
}
}

main()

</script>

Jul 23 '05 #1
36 5184
Suggest reading this (very informative) article on quicksort
http://www.angelfire.com/pq/jamesbar...rtIsBroken.htm
Which discusses the stack overflow problems often associated with
quicksorts, and how to mitigate them.

It's part of this good series on sorting in general.
http://www.angelfire.com/pq/jamesbar...ngOverview.htm

Also, cross-posting I believe is considered bad form.. :-)

Jul 23 '05 #2
HERC777 wrote:
just paste the below into notepad, call it iqsort.html double click it
and your IE browser will run it. (neat! a universal programming
language we can all run!)

it falls out from the sort procedure. I got javascript quicksort
running, it's quick but it gets stack overflow after about 5000
elements.

Am I passing the array as a parameter alright? I think javascript
default is to pass pointers, that can be global.

Herc


<script language = "javascript">


The language attributes is depreciated, type is required.

<script type="text/javascript">

Ok, you got me. What is the point of this 'Quicksort'? I didn't work
at all, I could not be bothered to debug it. Below is a script that
uses 20 lines of code to generate an array of any length, with any
range, then sort it either ascending or descending. Tested it with
up to 100,000 terms.

The script is adapted from here:

<URL:http://www.coedu.usf.edu/wwwprog/sort_demo.html>

Incidentally, using the above link, a 'quicksort' requires over 5,000
compares and took nearly 20 seconds on my old laptop to sort 100
numbers. The 'jsSort' algorithm took 0.05 seconds to do 1,000
numbers in Firefox and 0.15 seconds in IE.

So the question remains: what is the point of a 'quicksort' except to
show how slow the algorithm is?

--
Fred

<script type="text/javascript">
function genArray(n,r) {
var a = [];
while(n--) {a[n] = Math.floor(Math.random() * r)}
return a;
}
function doSort(n,d,r) {
var z = genArray(n,r);
var start = new Date().getTime();
('a' == d)? z.sort(compA): z.sort(compD);
var end = new Date().getTime();
document.getElementById('result').innerHTML =
'That took ' + (end-start) + ' milliseconds<br>'
+ z.join(', ');
}
function compD(a,b) {
return ((a < b) ? 1 : ((a > b) ? -1 : 0));
}
function compA(a,b) {
return ((a < b) ? -1 : ((a > b) ? 1 : 0));
}
</script>
<form action="">
<input type="text" size="10" name="num">Number of terms<br>
<input type="text" size="10" name="range">Range of numbers<br>
<input type="button" value="Sort ascending" onclick="
doSort(this.form.num.value,'a',this.form.range.val ue);
">
<input type="button" value="Sort descending" onclick="
doSort(this.form.num.value,'d',this.form.range.val ue);
">
</form><br>
<span id="result">result goes here</span>

Jul 23 '05 #3
> Suggest reading this (very informative) article on quicksort
http://www.angelfire.com/pq/ja mesbarbetti/articles/sorting/0

01_Quicks...

The author of this article seems unaware of Bentley-McIlroy
3-way quicksort. Given that this is the modern quicksort
implementation in Java (for primitive types) and C (qsort),
this seems like a pretty serious omission. Like many sorting
algorithms, quicksort has some positive and some negative
features. If you want to learn about sorting, read Sedgewick's
Algorithms in X or Knuth.

Jul 23 '05 #4
> just paste the below into notepad, call it iqsort.html double click it
and your IE browser will run it. (neat! a universal programming
language we can all run!)

it falls out from the sort procedure. I got javascript quicksort
running, it's quick but it gets stack overflow after about 5000
elements.

Am I passing the array as a parameter alright? I think javascript
default is to pass pointers, that can be global.


Some of the browsers have pretty shallow stacks.
Jul 23 '05 #5
my codes buggy, so's yours, so's theirs.

is the last box using an inbuilt Javascript sort function?

Herc

Jul 23 '05 #6
HERC777 wrote:
my codes buggy, so's yours, so's theirs.

Mine's buggy? I'll cop that if you tell me why you think so. I ran
a 100,000 element array with a range of 10,000 and it worked fine.

OK, Firefox complained about a script taking too long to run, but
otherwise, fine. I think I only tested IE up to 10,000 - but who is
using 10,000 element arrays in JavaScript?.

is the last box using an inbuilt Javascript sort function?
Which 'last box'? In mine, you put a value in the number of elements
(say 10000) and the range (say 1000 or 100000).

Herc

--
Fred
Jul 23 '05 #7
KBH
> just paste...into notepad, call it iqsort.html double click it

The following is not a quicksort but here is an example of the 'KBH Integer
Sort':

For i:= lw To hg Do
Begin
c[a[i]]:= c[a[i]] + 1;
End

where the un-sorted data is in the a-array .
And here is demonstration code of the 'KBH Integer Sort' :

Var
ag: string;
i, ii, t, lw, hg: integer;
a, c: array [0..999999] of integer;

begin
WriteLn('KBH Integer Sort');
WriteLn;
lw:= 0;
hg:= 999999;
Randomize;

For ii:= lw To hg Do
Begin
a[ii]:= Random(1000000);
End;

{Presrt;}
{Presrt determines smallest and largest a-array values if necessary and
applies translation relative to c-array declaration if necessary}

Write(' Enter any letter to begin sort: ');
ReadLn(ag);
WriteLn;

For i:= lw To hg Do
Begin
c[a[i]]:= c[a[i]] + 1;
End;

WriteLn(' [ Sort completed ]');
WriteLn;

{For t:= lw To hg Do
Begin
For j:= 1 To c[t] Do
Begin
WriteLn(t:5);
End;
End;}

For t:= lw To hg Do
Begin
If (c[t] <> 0) Then
Begin
WriteLn(' [ The first sorted number is: ', t:10, ' ]');
WriteLn(' [ There are ', c[t], ' of these numbers consecutive ]');
Break;
End;
End;

WriteLn;

For t:= hg DownTo lw Do
Begin
If (c[t] <> 0) Then
Begin
WriteLn(' [ The last sorted number is: ', t:10, ' ]');
WriteLn(' [ There are ', c[t], ' of these numbers consecutive ]');
Break;
End;
End;

ReadLn;
end.
And here is a link to the 'KBH Integer Sort' :

http://www.kbhscape.com/sort.htm

And that web page is due some editing...
Jul 23 '05 #8
Lee
KBH said:
just paste...into notepad, call it iqsort.html double click it


The following is not a quicksort but here is an example of the 'KBH Integer
Sort':

For i:= lw To hg Do
Begin
c[a[i]]:= c[a[i]] + 1;
End

where the un-sorted data is in the a-array .


Isn't that a Bucket Sort with a bucket size of 1?

Jul 23 '05 #9
it didn't do anything on my IE 5.5. copied it twice.

the 'last box' on the URL you gave, says it uses javascript sort(),
what does that mean?

if you put a big text file in it it stuffs up and keeps stuffing up,
even on the 10 countries example..

Herc

Jul 23 '05 #10
i think you're missing a line.

The KBH Integer Sort: b(a(i)) = a(i)
The array assignment count: c(a(i)) = c(a(i)) + 1

All you're doing is incrementing all the values, the second line above,
you don't even have a comparison operator anywhere.

Herc

Jul 23 '05 #11
KBH
>i think you're missing a line.
The KBH Integer Sort: b(a(i)) = a(i)
The array assignment count: c(a(i)) = c(a(i)) + 1

No, b(a(i)) = a(i) is the fundamental operation. Combining the array
assignment count with the fundamental operation lead to the sophistication
of using
c(a(i)) = c(a(i)) + 1 entirely alone...which means that the two operations
have the fundamental relation.
All you're doing is incrementing all the values, the second line above,
you don't even have a comparison operator anywhere.


No, I'm not incrementing values. I'm counting the a(i) values and holding
the count at the a(i) value subscript location of the c-array...

A comparison operator is not needed. What is needed is a destination array
for the sort operation and the inherent structure of the array...Simple
output follows immediately after development of the c-array and this by
using only the logic of the c-array.

-----------------------------------------------------

Of course the random number generation that loaded the a-array were integers
0 <= n < upperbound .

Floats of the form of x.0 can be truncated to integers and translated to the
c-array declaration if they are larger than programming language integers.
Also, smaller floats could be multiplied by 10^n and truncated to integers.
And that leads to sorting by the truncated integer part of a float and then
sorting by a scaled and truncated previously fractional part of the float.

---------------------------------------------------------
Jul 23 '05 #12
HERC777 wrote:
it didn't do anything on my IE 5.5. copied it twice.
Ah, IE 5.

As far as I know, there are bits of JavaScript sort() not implemented
in IE 5. I can't tell you what they are, I don't have IE 5 and don't
have any links to info for you. :-(

I think the scripts here are OK for IE 5 (but I can't test them):

<URL:http://webfx.eae.net/dhtml/sortabletable/sortabletable.html>

the 'last box' on the URL you gave, says it uses javascript sort(),
what does that mean?
It uses the same JavaScript sort algorithm that I used. The others
use 'manual' sorting algorithms implemented in JavaScript.

if you put a big text file in it it stuffs up and keeps stuffing up,
even on the 10 countries example..


I think it's your browser - all works fine for me (Firefox and IE 6).
Can you upgrade to a newer version of Firefox or Mozilla if IE 6
isn't an option?

--
Rob
Jul 23 '05 #13
In comp.theory KBH <KB*@notmail.com> wrote:
:> just paste...into notepad, call it iqsort.html double click it

: The following is not a quicksort but here is an example of the 'KBH Integer
: Sort':

: For i:= lw To hg Do
: Begin
: c[a[i]]:= c[a[i]] + 1;
: End

: where the un-sorted data is in the a-array .

How does this differ from a Bucket sort?

Stephen
Jul 23 '05 #14
KBH
> : The following is not a quicksort but here is an example of the 'KBH
Integer
: Sort':

: For i:= lw To hg Do
: Begin
: c[a[i]]:= c[a[i]] + 1;
: End

: where the un-sorted data is in the a-array .
How does this differ from a Bucket sort?


What are you putting in your buckets ?

I call b[a[i]]:= a[i] an assignment sort but I must call
c[a[i]]:= c[a[i]] + 1 a count sort...but not "the counting sort" as that is
something different.

In either case I am assigning or counting programming language integers and
I call it the 'KBH Integer Sort' because other so-called integer sorts are
really digit sorts and that is also something different.
Jul 23 '05 #15
In comp.theory KBH <KB*@notmail.com> wrote:
:> : The following is not a quicksort but here is an example of the 'KBH
:> Integer
:> : Sort':
:>
:> : For i:= lw To hg Do
:> : Begin
:> : c[a[i]]:= c[a[i]] + 1;
:> : End
:>
:> : where the un-sorted data is in the a-array .

:>
:> How does this differ from a Bucket sort?
:>

: What are you putting in your buckets ?

The "buckets" contain the number of occurrences of each
item.

: I call b[a[i]]:= a[i] an assignment sort but I must call
: c[a[i]]:= c[a[i]] + 1 a count sort...but not "the counting sort" as that is
: something different.

That is a bucket sort. For example, see
http://www.brpreiss.com/books/opus4/html/page74.html

They use
++buckets[a[i]]
which is equivalent to your
c[a[i]:=c[a[i]] + 1

: In either case I am assigning or counting programming language integers and
: I call it the 'KBH Integer Sort' because other so-called integer sorts are
: really digit sorts and that is also something different.

Your 'KBH Integer Sort' is better known as Bucket Sort.

Stephen
Jul 23 '05 #16
KBH
> : The following is not a quicksort but here is an example of the 'KBH
Integer
: Sort':

: For i:= lw To hg Do
: Begin
: c[a[i]]:= c[a[i]] + 1;
: End

: where the un-sorted data is in the a-array .

How does this differ from a Bucket sort?


A web search for Bucket Sort and for Counting Sort finds that they both have
nested loops and I am not nesting loops. A web search for Integer Sort turns
up the Radix Sort and that is what I call a digit sort...
Jul 23 '05 #17
In comp.theory KBH <KB*@notmail.com> wrote:
:> : The following is not a quicksort but here is an example of the 'KBH
:> Integer
:> : Sort':
:>
:> : For i:= lw To hg Do
:> : Begin
:> : c[a[i]]:= c[a[i]] + 1;
:> : End
:>
:> : where the un-sorted data is in the a-array .
:>
:> How does this differ from a Bucket sort?
:>

: A web search for Bucket Sort and for Counting Sort finds that they both have
: nested loops and I am not nesting loops. A web search for Integer Sort turns
: up the Radix Sort and that is what I call a digit sort...
Bucket Sort does not have nested loops, unless you count
the loop to print out the sorted values, but your code has
the same nested loops.

Stephen
Jul 23 '05 #18
KBH
> :> : The following is not a quicksort but here is an example of the 'KBH
:> Integer
:> : Sort':
:>
:> : For i:= lw To hg Do
:> : Begin
:> : c[a[i]]:= c[a[i]] + 1;
:> : End
:>
:> : where the un-sorted data is in the a-array .
:>
:> How does this differ from a Bucket sort?
:>

: A web search for Bucket Sort and for Counting Sort finds that they both
have
: nested loops and I am not nesting loops. A web search for Integer Sort
turns
: up the Radix Sort and that is what I call a digit sort...
Bucket Sort does not have nested loops, unless you count
the loop to print out the sorted values, but your code has
the same nested loops.


Let's just continue to disagree.

One Bucket Sort link mentions combination with an Insertion Sort. So the
idea seems to be a finished array that only requires ordinary logic for a
later output. (The insertion step must be building a finished array from an
intermediate array with both of those arrays just different portions of the
same array.)

My finished array requires requires a particular logic for later output but
not additional sorting.
Jul 23 '05 #19
OK, now I understand bucket sort I'll use that in future, as long as
the range of values of known. Thanks for the links I have enough info
now.

Herc

Jul 23 '05 #20
Right, got it going! I thought all sort algorithms had square
complexity worst case, and the recursive ones (quicksort, mergesort..)
had log linear average case.

That only works for a discrete range of values, but I adapted it using
a 2D array to store pointers to the file I'm sorting, sorting on line
length.

for (i=0;i<line;i++) {
ll = lines[i].length
linarr[ll] [full[ll]] = i
full[ll]++
}

Same as yours but it stores an array of pointers for each size so it
keeps track of the elements it sorted, instead of just counting them.

Then I just grab the elements back out in order.

sfile = ""
for (i=0;i<linesize;i++) {
for (j=0;j<full[i];j++) {
sfile += lines[linarr[i][j]]
}
}

Single pass sorting, 1,000s of times faster than my 1st attempt with
bubblesort.

Herc

Jul 23 '05 #21
"HERC777" <he*****@hotmail.com> writes:
Right, got it going! I thought all sort algorithms had square
complexity worst case,
What nonsense.
and the recursive ones (quicksort, mergesort..) had log linear
average case.
Mergesort's worst case is almost indistinguishable from its average
case.

It can be shown that merging two chains of length n and m requires
n+m-1 comparisons in the worst case, and nm((1/(n+1)) + (1/(m+1)))
comparisons in the average case. Now for a straight mergesort, n is
very close to m, so you have about 2n-1 comparisons worst case as
compared to 2n - 2 + (2/(n+1)) average case: not even a single
comparison difference!

Anyway, you can't get away with less than O(n log n) _binary_
comparisons. Bucketing has nothing to do with that.
That only works for a discrete range of values, but I adapted it
using a 2D array to store pointers to the file I'm sorting, sorting
on line length.

for (i=0;i<line;i++) {
ll = lines[i].length
linarr[ll] [full[ll]] = i
full[ll]++
}

Same as yours but it stores an array of pointers for each size so it
keeps track of the elements it sorted, instead of just counting
them.

Then I just grab the elements back out in order.

sfile = ""
for (i=0;i<linesize;i++) {
for (j=0;j<full[i];j++) {
sfile += lines[linarr[i][j]]
}
}

Single pass sorting, 1,000s of times faster than my 1st attempt with
bubblesort.


Sure, as long as the value set is small enough.

--
David Kastrup, Kriemhildstr. 15, 44793 Bochum
Jul 23 '05 #22
Lee
KBH said:
: The following is not a quicksort but here is an example of the 'KBH
Integer
: Sort':

: For i:= lw To hg Do
: Begin
: c[a[i]]:= c[a[i]] + 1;
: End

: where the un-sorted data is in the a-array .

How does this differ from a Bucket sort?


A web search for Bucket Sort and for Counting Sort finds that they both have
nested loops and I am not nesting loops. A web search for Integer Sort turns
up the Radix Sort and that is what I call a digit sort...


In the general case, in which you have duplicate values, your
sort uses nested loops to read the values back out of the
buckets. Your Bucket-1 Sort is optimized for the extremely
limited case of nearly consecutive, non-repeating integers.

Jul 23 '05 #23
"KBH" <KB*@notmail.com> writes:
How does this differ from a Bucket sort?

What are you putting in your buckets ?


The numbers. Except that because only one value fits in each bucket,
and the value is just the integer, you can optimize it to only
remembering the count.
I call b[a[i]]:= a[i] an assignment sort but I must call
c[a[i]]:= c[a[i]] + 1 a count sort...but not "the counting sort" as that is
something different.
The "assignment sort" is equvialent to the count sort where the only
values of the count are 0 and 1 (it's just that 1 is represented by
the value - a bit vector would probably be more efficient).
In either case I am assigning or counting programming language integers and
I call it the 'KBH Integer Sort' because other so-called integer sorts are
really digit sorts and that is also something different.


The "digit sorts" (e.g., Radix Sort
<URL:http://en.wikipedia.com/wiki/Radix_sort>) are just generalizations.
Your integer sort is a trivial radix sort with a radix large enough
to hold all values to be sorted, and therefore requireing only one
round.

You can get away with only counting instances, instead of adding
the elements to be sorted to buckets, because you are only sorting
integers themselves. If you needed to sort more general elements
with integers as keys, you would need buckets too.

/L
--
Lasse Reichstein Nielsen - lr*@hotpop.com
DHTML Death Colors: <URL:http://www.infimum.dk/HTML/rasterTriangleDOM.html>
'Faith without judgement merely degrades the spirit divine.'
Jul 23 '05 #24
"KBH" <KB*@notmail.com> writes:
A web search for Bucket Sort and for Counting Sort finds that they both have
nested loops and I am not nesting loops.


Counting sort has no nested loops:
<URL:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Counting_sort>
It corresponds to your integer sort.

/L
--
Lasse Reichstein Nielsen - lr*@hotpop.com
DHTML Death Colors: <URL:http://www.infimum.dk/HTML/rasterTriangleDOM.html>
'Faith without judgement merely degrades the spirit divine.'
Jul 23 '05 #25
In comp.theory Lasse Reichstein Nielsen <lr*@hotpop.com> wrote:
: "KBH" <KB*@notmail.com> writes:

:> A web search for Bucket Sort and for Counting Sort finds that they both have
:> nested loops and I am not nesting loops.

: Counting sort has no nested loops:
: <URL:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Counting_sort>
: It corresponds to your integer sort.

Apparently the name "Bucket Sort" is used inconsistently. Web searches
turn up examples where the name is used to describe the above Counting Sort, and
also to describe variations that use linked lists and secondary sorts.

Stephen
Jul 23 '05 #26
KBH
>> What are you putting in your buckets ?

The numbers. Except that because only one value fits in each bucket,
and the value is just the integer, you can optimize it to only
remembering the count.

We are putting "the numbers" in the buckets but since the numbers are single
integers they can only be the count of the numbers ? That's not really a
concise explaination...
I call b[a[i]]:= a[i] an assignment sort but I must call
c[a[i]]:= c[a[i]] + 1 a count sort...but not "the counting sort" as that
is
something different.


The "assignment sort" is equvialent to the count sort where the only
values of the count are 0 and 1 (it's just that 1 is represented by
the value - a bit vector would probably be more efficient).


Well b(a(i)) = a(i) puts the actual value in the b-array and not a count of
the value...It's just very fundamental but there is significance to the
subscript location in the b-array.
In either case I am assigning or counting programming language integers
and
I call it the 'KBH Integer Sort' because other so-called integer sorts
are
really digit sorts and that is also something different.


The "digit sorts" (e.g., Radix Sort
) are just generalizations.
Your integer sort is a trivial radix sort with a radix large enough
to hold all values to be sorted, and therefore requireing only one
round.


If various places you identify as Bucket Sort, Radix Sort, and Counting
Sort. That's just not concise...
You can get away with only counting instances, instead of adding
the elements to be sorted to buckets, because you are only sorting
integers themselves. If you needed to sort more general elements
with integers as keys, you would need buckets too.


I have no problem with a relation to a more comprehensively developed sort.
My sort is just less comprehensively developed but it must be identified in
some way so as to have a known logic for output of the c-array.

Also, "Bucket Sort" should be under a broader category such as assignment
sort or count sort...because fundamentally there really is no such thing as
"buckets". There are only assignments, counts, comparisons, and prehaps
insertions...
Jul 23 '05 #27
On Tue, 19 Apr 2005 17:32:36 +0000, stephe wrote:
Apparently the name "Bucket Sort" is used inconsistently.


"Bucket sort" is a general type of sort. Counting sort is one kind.
http://www.nist.gov/dads/HTML/countingsort.html

Histogram sort is another kind.

-paul-
--
Paul E. Black (p.*****@acm.org)

P.S. The counting sort entry was created Wed Feb 3 13:42:31 1999.

Jul 23 '05 #28
http://www.freewebs.com/namesort

does this work? works in IE 5.5 but someone said it does nothing.

Herc

Jul 23 '05 #29
nobody can test this for me? takes 2 clicks. the link and the sort
button.

http://www.freewebs.com/nameso*rt

Jul 23 '05 #30
In message <11**********************@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups .com>,
HERC777 <he*****@hotmail.com> writes
just paste the below into notepad, call it iqsort.html double click it
and your IE browser will run it. (neat! a universal programming
language we can all run!)

it falls out from the sort procedure. I got javascript quicksort
running, it's quick but it gets stack overflow after about 5000
elements.

Am I passing the array as a parameter alright? I think javascript
default is to pass pointers, that can be global.

Herc

<script language = "javascript">

....

Why does it only work for a Microsoft browser?
Is it because this invalid HTML?

--
Jeremy Boden
Jul 23 '05 #31
I dumped the quicksort and am using this but so far only works on IE5.5

http://www.freewebs.com/nameso**rt

no one will even tell me if it works on their browser, oh well, 1000
gumbies posing as computer gurus. you can all rot in hell, and I"m
Adam so I'll see to it.

Herc

Jul 23 '05 #32
"HERC777" <he*****@hotmail.com> writes:
nobody can test this for me? takes 2 clicks. the link and the sort
button.
I clicked the link (then corrected it) and then clicked the button.
Test was successful.
http://www.freewebs.com/nameso*rt


There's no "-" in "sort" :)

/L
--
Lasse Reichstein Nielsen - lr*@hotpop.com
DHTML Death Colors: <URL:http://www.infimum.dk/HTML/rasterTriangleDOM.html>
'Faith without judgement merely degrades the spirit divine.'
Jul 23 '05 #33
OK, sounds like you're using IE he must be using the
fireoperanavigatorlinux rubbish.

Herc

Jul 23 '05 #34
In message <11*********************@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups. com>,
HERC777 <he*****@hotmail.com> writes
I dumped the quicksort and am using this but so far only works on IE5.5

http://www.freewebs.com/nameso**rt

no one will even tell me if it works on their browser, oh well, 1000
gumbies posing as computer gurus. you can all rot in hell, and I"m
Adam so I'll see to it.

Herc

OK:-
If I respell that link as http://www.freewebs.com/namesort (no ----)
then I get a web page with a rather poor font and an invitation to paste
some text.
I do this and do a "Domain sorting made Easy".
Unfortunately I do not possess a list of domains and so when I press the
"sort" button, nothing happens.

P.S. I use the Firefox browser.
Better luck next time.
Rot in hell etc...

--
Jeremy Boden
Jul 23 '05 #35
no ones trembling at my wrath.. hell is in preproduction stage so watch
out for it. some browsers don't like freewebs so the code is fine in
IE, thanks one and all.

a note to all the non web programmers out there.. freewebs is an
excellent point and click free web builder. just click on join...
beginner style... pick a template for your site, add a menu button,
fill in the details.. add a paragraph. Highly recomended for non
programmers to get stuff on the web.

and no ads on a free service, I think there's a small link at the end
of the page, free web servers are great, just leave it and come back in
a few years, remind your password and the site is still going... most
of my hosted sites died at one point or another, free hosting is the
way to go.

tip #2. use form2email.com and use that for your email sig.. and to
get super traffic to your site, have a Partner Sites on your main page
with about 20 links, and a form2email with the link to your site and
they fill in details on their site where they linked to you. one guys
making $80,000 a year and he gets 30 emails a day with the details of
where people linked to him, of course he's got 100,000 links going in
and only 30 going out so he just ignores it. But don't autolink
because google penalises you for being a link farm, but Partner Sites
is allowed!

that's about all I know

Herc

Jul 23 '05 #36
"HERC777" <he*****@hotmail.com> writes:
OK, sounds like you're using IE he must be using the
fireoperanavigatorlinux rubbish.


Who are you talking to (and about what)?

It might be me, in which case you are wrong.
/L
--
Lasse Reichstein Nielsen - lr*@hotpop.com
DHTML Death Colors: <URL:http://www.infimum.dk/HTML/rasterTriangleDOM.html>
'Faith without judgement merely degrades the spirit divine.'
Jul 23 '05 #37

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