By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
459,945 Members | 1,354 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 459,945 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

Need a little help with NODES

P: n/a
Hello,

I am a little confused... please help:

-----------------------------------
<DIV id="01">
<DIV id="aNum"></DIV>
<DIV id="bNum"></DIV>
<DIV id="cNum"></DIV>
</DIV>
------------------------------------

is <DIV id="01"> the parent node of <DIV id="aNum"></DIV> ?

If so... How do I access each child using DOM...

shoud this work?:
a = document.getElementById('DIV');
b = a(0).childNodes.length;

Thanks...
Jul 23 '05 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
2 Replies


P: n/a
On 8 Sep 2004 15:46:00 -0700, Charlie T <ch*************@gmail.com> wrote:
Hello,

I am a little confused... please help:

-----------------------------------
<DIV id="01">
<DIV id="aNum"></DIV>
<DIV id="bNum"></DIV>
<DIV id="cNum"></DIV>
</DIV>
------------------------------------

is <DIV id="01"> the parent node of <DIV id="aNum"></DIV> ?
It is the parent of all of the <x>Num DIV elements. However, you should be
aware that you cannot start an id attribute value with a number. It must
begin with a letter.
If so... How do I access each child using DOM...

shoud this work?:
a = document.getElementById('DIV');
b = a(0).childNodes.length;


No. You'll either want

var a = document.getElementById('divId');

or

var a = document.getElementsByTagName('DIV');

The first returns a reference to a specific DIV. The second returns a
(possibly empty) collection of all DIV elements in the document. Once you
have a reference to a particular node, then yes, you can use the
childNodes property to access the children of that node.

Another thing to note is that you don't index collections with parentheses
(). You use square brackets []. Whilst IE supports the use of parentheses,
that vast majority of browsers do not (and *should* not).

Finally, all of this has an important caveat: not all browsers you can
encounter on the Web will support the DOM. To be safe, you should always
test for a feature before using it.

if(document.getElementById)
var d = document.getElementById('myDiv');

if(d && d.childNodes) {
// Do stuff with the childNodes collection
}
}

If you haven't already, do read the FAQ entry on feature detection
(section 4.26):

Good luck,
Mike
clj FAQ:
<URL:http://jibbering.com/faq/>

--
Michael Winter
Replace ".invalid" with ".uk" to reply by e-mail.
Jul 23 '05 #2

P: n/a
Lee
Charlie T said:

Hello,

I am a little confused... please help:

-----------------------------------
<DIV id="01">
<DIV id="aNum"></DIV>
<DIV id="bNum"></DIV>
<DIV id="cNum"></DIV>
</DIV>
------------------------------------

is <DIV id="01"> the parent node of <DIV id="aNum"></DIV> ?
Yes.

If so... How do I access each child using DOM...

shoud this work?:
a = document.getElementById('DIV');
b = a(0).childNodes.length;


No, it shouldn't.
"DIV" is not the ID of any of your elements.
"a" is not a function, so "a(0)" is undefined.

a = document.getElementById('01');
b = a.childNodes.length;

Note that element '01' in your example has 7 childNodes,
including the text nodes surrounding the <div> nodes.

Jul 23 '05 #3

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.