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How do I disable IE6?

P: n/a
I'm a beginner with JS. When I try to disable JavaScript in IE6, I can't
seem to turn it off in order to do off-line tests -- with or without JS
enabled -- on my developing site.

What I try in IE is: Tools => Internet Options => Security => Custom Level
=> Scripting => Active Scripting (disable).

When I do this, and visit sites on-line, JS is disabled. And I can disable
JS in NN, Moz and Opera (and use the <noscript> </noscript> feature). But
no matter what I do with IE6, when I open my htm file off-line the "test" JS
in my site is always active (and I can't get the <noscript></noscript> code
to work).

What am I missing (besides my marbles)?

Craig
Jul 23 '05 #1
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10 Replies


P: n/a

"Craig" wrote:

..........
What I try in IE is: Tools => Internet Options => Security => Custom Level => Scripting => Active Scripting (disable).

...........

but what you are actually doing is :
Tools => Internet Options => Security
=>Internet
=> Custom Level=> Scripting => Active Scripting (disable).

If you look carefully at
Tools => Internet Options => Security
you can see there 4 Icons
the first one is Internet, and it is preselected.

Just select what you want: " local Intranet" instead.

So:

Tools => Internet Options => Security
=> local Intranet
=> Custom Level=> Scripting => Active Scripting (disable).
m
Jul 23 '05 #2

P: n/a
On Tue, 7 Sep 2004 22:54:23 -0600, Craig wrote:
I'm a beginner with JS. When I try to disable JavaScript in IE6, I can't
seem to turn it off in order to do off-line tests -- with or without JS
enabled -- on my developing site.


I am not sure what the IE prefs are supposed to do
when you disable/enable JAvascript, but I never
sucessfully managed to disable JS in IE till I
saw this post by Grant Wagner.

[ Brace yourself, it's a bit scary! ]

<http://google.com/groups?selm=4086C1C3.8120D1B6%40agricoreunited.com >

--
Andrew Thompson
http://www.PhySci.org/ Open-source software suite
http://www.PhySci.org/codes/ Web & IT Help
http://www.1point1C.org/ Science & Technology
Jul 23 '05 #3

P: n/a
Craig wrote:
I'm a beginner with JS. When I try to disable JavaScript
in IE6, I can't seem to turn it off in order to do off-line
tests -- with or without JS enabled -- on my developing site.

What I try in IE is: Tools => Internet Options => Security =>
Custom Level => Scripting => Active Scripting (disable).

<snip>

One obvious strategy for testing web sites is to set up a local HTTP
server and test the site from there. In that way you can convince IE
that it is accessing the site from the Internet and internet security
settings will be applied, giving a much more realistic impression of how
the site will behave when it is on a public server.

Richard.
Jul 23 '05 #4

P: n/a
"mehdi amini" <m@grauland.de> wrote in message news:<2q************@uni-berlin.de>...
"Craig" wrote:

.........
What I try in IE is: Tools => Internet Options => Security => Custom

Level
=> Scripting => Active Scripting (disable).

..........

but what you are actually doing is :
Tools => Internet Options => Security
=>Internet
=> Custom Level=> Scripting => Active Scripting (disable).

If you look carefully at
Tools => Internet Options => Security
you can see there 4 Icons
the first one is Internet, and it is preselected.

Just select what you want: " local Intranet" instead.

So:

Tools => Internet Options => Security
=> local Intranet
=> Custom Level=> Scripting => Active Scripting (disable).
m


Thank you for your responce.

I tried you suggestion: it didn't work for me.

Craig
Jul 23 '05 #5

P: n/a
Andrew Thompson <Se********@www.invalid> wrote in message news:<oj****************************@40tude.net>.. .
On Tue, 7 Sep 2004 22:54:23 -0600, Craig wrote:
I'm a beginner with JS. When I try to disable JavaScript in IE6, I can't
seem to turn it off in order to do off-line tests -- with or without JS
enabled -- on my developing site.


I am not sure what the IE prefs are supposed to do
when you disable/enable JAvascript, but I never
sucessfully managed to disable JS in IE till I
saw this post by Grant Wagner.

[ Brace yourself, it's a bit scary! ]

<http://google.com/groups?selm=4086C1C3.8120D1B6%40agricoreunited.com >


Thank you for your responce.

Your suggestion is indeed a scary one -- for me, at any rate. In lieu
of all that (and, if nothing else), I can rely on browsers other than
IE to test the 'JS disabled' functioning of my site.

Craig
Jul 23 '05 #6

P: n/a
"Richard Cornford" <Ri*****@litotes.demon.co.uk> wrote in message news:<ch*******************@news.demon.co.uk>...
Craig wrote:
I'm a beginner with JS. When I try to disable JavaScript
in IE6, I can't seem to turn it off in order to do off-line
tests -- with or without JS enabled -- on my developing site.

What I try in IE is: Tools => Internet Options => Security =>
Custom Level => Scripting => Active Scripting (disable).

<snip>

One obvious strategy for testing web sites is to set up a local HTTP
server and test the site from there. In that way you can convince IE
that it is accessing the site from the Internet and internet security
settings will be applied, giving a much more realistic impression of how
the site will behave when it is on a public server.

Richard.


Thank you for your responce.

Your suggestion is well taken: but, is setting up a local HTTP server
plausable for a 'marble-less' novice website developer? (I am well
versed in HTML, CSS, XHTML and a bit of JS; and, I have perviewed the
Apache download site: http://httpd.apache.org/download.cgi.)

Craig.
Jul 23 '05 #7

P: n/a

"Newsgroup_Poster8" wrote:

I tried you suggestion: it didn't work for me.

Craig


so for me when I test against the filesystem, sorry.
I now realized that my test was against my local tomcat.

-> Richard Cornford advice: local HTTPserver

bye
m
Jul 23 '05 #8

P: n/a
ne***************@yahoo.com (Newsgroup_Poster8) wrote in message
Your suggestion is well taken: but, is setting up a local HTTP server
plausable for a 'marble-less' novice website developer? (I am well
versed in HTML, CSS, XHTML and a bit of JS; and, I have perviewed the
Apache download site: http://httpd.apache.org/download.cgi.)

The most difficult part is figuring out what file to download. Skip
all that stuff about verifying that the download got downloaded
correctly.

Once you get the correct file, it might tell you got get the MSI
package. It will tell you where to download it from on the MS site.

As far as installing it, it is easy. It runs without any
configuration. Just create a subfolder in the main documention folder
for your site.

For Windows 98, it is best to manually start Apache everytime.

Now if you had MacOS X, you'd find that MacOS X comes with Apache.

Robert
Jul 23 '05 #9

P: n/a
On 9 Sep 2004 15:49:48 -0700, Newsgroup_Poster8 wrote:
<http://google.com/groups?selm=4086C1C3.8120D1B6%40agricoreunited.com >
... Your suggestion is indeed a scary one -- for me, at any rate.
Fair enough. I will assure you though,
that I tried it successfully, and that I
only tried it because I was confident that
Grant had already tested it himself.
... In lieu
of all that (and, if nothing else), I can rely on browsers other than
IE to test the 'JS disabled' functioning of my site.


(chuckles) Fair enough! I have only ever tried it
once, for an IE specific problem where I needed to
test every possibility available to me.

Most of my 'no JS' testing is done in Moz.

--
Andrew Thompson
http://www.PhySci.org/ Open-source software suite
http://www.PhySci.org/codes/ Web & IT Help
http://www.1point1C.org/ Science & Technology
Jul 23 '05 #10

P: n/a
Newsgroup_Poster8 wrote:
Richard Cornford wrote:
One obvious strategy for testing web sites is to set up
a local HTTP server and test the site from there. ...
<snip> Your suggestion is well taken: but, is setting up a
local HTTP server plausable for a 'marble-less' novice
website developer? (I am well versed in HTML, CSS,
XHTML and a bit of JS; and, I have perviewed the Apache
download site: http://httpd.apache.org/download.cgi.)


I have no idea what impact being 'marble-less' would have on your
ability to set up a local HTTP server. But my perception would be that
if you want to call yourself a web developer you want (probably need) to
have some familiarity with HTTP servers, and setting one up (preferably
Apache and/or IIS initially, as they are probably the two most widely
used on the Internet) to run locally (and configuring it to be a
sensible test environment) is going to make a positive contribution in
that direction.

Richard.
Jul 23 '05 #11

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