473,594 Members | 2,682 Online
Bytes | Software Development & Data Engineering Community
+ Post

Home Posts Topics Members FAQ

Inconsistent results - why?

<SWM.HTM listing; does not work; positioning wrong (below main GIF)>
<!-- IE adds a horizontal 4-icon strip near the upper left
corner when that area is visited (WTF?) -->
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<title>Stripp er wells and production</title>
</head>

<SCRIPT LANGUAGE="JavaS cript">
<!--
if (document.image s) {
var onef = new Image();
onef.src = "om2.gif";
var oneo = new Image();
oneo.src = "om22.gif";
}

function act(imgName) {
if (document.image s)
document[imgName].src = eval(imgName + "o.src");
}

function inact(imgName) {
if (document.image s)
document[imgName].src = eval(imgName + "f.src");
}
// -->
</SCRIPT>

<body centered
style="position : centered; height: 431px; width: 760px;" >
<img SRC="Usa52.gif" height="431" width="760" BORDER="0" ALT="USA map">
</BODY>

<div style="position ; absolute; top: 55px; left: 257px; "
<img style = "" border="0" alt="X" >
<A onMouseOver="ac t('one')"
onMouseOut="ina ct('one')" />
<IMG SRC="om2.gif" NAME="one" BORDER="0" ALT="black X"></A>

</SWM.HTM listing>
*******

<OMX.HTM listing; works & positioning is correct>
<!-- IE adds a horizontal 4-icon strip near the upper left
corner when that area is visited (WTF?) -->

<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<title>HTML onmouse over information and help</title>
</head>

<SCRIPT LANGUAGE="JavaS cript">
<!--
if (document.image s) {
var onef = new Image();
onef.src = "om2.gif";
var oneo = new Image();
oneo.src = "om22.gif";
}

function act(imgName) {
if (document.image s)
document[imgName].src = eval(imgName + "o.src");
}

function inact(imgName) {
if (document.image s)
document[imgName].src = eval(imgName + "f.src");
}
// -->
</SCRIPT>

<body centered
style="position : centered; height: 431px; width: 760px;" >
<img SRC="Usa52.gif" height="431" width="760" BORDER="0" ALT="USA map">
</BODY>

<div style="position : absolute; top: 120px; left: 220px; "
<img style = "" BORDER="0" ALT="X" >
<A onMouseOver="ac t('one')"
onMouseOut="ina ct('one')">
<IMG SRC="om2.gif" NAME="one" BORDER="0" ALT="black X"></A>

</OMX.HTM listing>
Apr 9 '06 #1
10 1474
Robert Baer said on 10/04/2006 9:36 AM AEST:
<SWM.HTM listing; does not work; positioning wrong (below main GIF)>
<!-- IE adds a horizontal 4-icon strip near the upper left
corner when that area is visited (WTF?) -->
I guess that is IE's image toolbar. You can turn it off/on in:

Tools->Internet options->Advanced->Multimedia->Enable image toolbar

Is there a question here? If you wondering why your page behaves
strangely, you need to start with valid HTML. You have invalid
attributes and elements outside the body element. What various browsers
do with it will likely be different (or maybe not).

It's the dancing bear syndrome: wonder not how well the bear dances, but
that it dances at all. :-)

<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<title>Stripp er wells and production</title>
</head>

<SCRIPT LANGUAGE="JavaS cript">
The language attribute is deprecated, type is required.
<!--
Never use HTML comments inside script elements.

if (document.image s) {
var onef = new Image();
onef.src = "om2.gif";
var oneo = new Image();
oneo.src = "om22.gif";
}

function act(imgName) {
if (document.image s)
document[imgName].src = eval(imgName + "o.src");
The use of eval here is totally unnecessary:

document[imgName].src = imgName + "o.src";

}

function inact(imgName) {
if (document.image s)
document[imgName].src = eval(imgName + "f.src");
document[imgName].src = imgName + "f.src";

}
// -->
</SCRIPT>

<body centered
There is no 'centered' attribute in HTML 4.
style="position : centered; height: 431px; width: 760px;" >
<img SRC="Usa52.gif" height="431" width="760" BORDER="0" ALT="USA map">
</BODY>
Here your body element is closed, no further HTML elements are allowed,
all that can follow is a closing </HTML> tag.

<div style="position ; absolute; top: 55px; left: 257px; "
<img style = "" border="0" alt="X" >
<A onMouseOver="ac t('one')"
onMouseOut="ina ct('one')" />
Is this some kind of pseudo XHTML? An A element can't be empty (i.e. it
must have a tag pair), don't use an XHTML tag closure - remove the '/'.

<IMG SRC="om2.gif" NAME="one" BORDER="0" ALT="black X"></A>


Why not put the mouseover on the image itself?

<img src='om2.gif' onmouseover="th is.src='om22.gi f';"
onmouseout="thi s.src='om2.gif' ;" ... >
Mouseovers are frequently done with CSS now as it's more efficient than
pre-loading images, investigate that. If your document is small and
only has two images, pre-loading seems pointless.
[...]
--
Rob
Group FAQ: <URL:http://www.jibbering.c om/FAQ>
Apr 10 '06 #2
RobG wrote:
Robert Baer said on 10/04/2006 9:36 AM AEST:
<SWM.HTM listing; does not work; positioning wrong (below main GIF)>
<!-- IE adds a horizontal 4-icon strip near the upper left
corner when that area is visited (WTF?) -->

I guess that is IE's image toolbar. You can turn it off/on in:

Tools->Internet options->Advanced->Multimedia->Enable image toolbar

*** Oh; thanks.

Is there a question here? If you wondering why your page behaves
strangely, you need to start with valid HTML. You have invalid
attributes and elements outside the body element. What various browsers
do with it will likely be different (or maybe not). ** Well, right or wrong, the first one does not work, and the second one
does and ther is no meaningful difference.
That is the question.
However, making fixed is very helpful.
"invalid attributes and elements": i do not have a clue where or what
should be.

It's the dancing bear syndrome: wonder not how well the bear dances, but
that it dances at all. :-)

<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<title>Stripp er wells and production</title>
</head>

<SCRIPT LANGUAGE="JavaS cript">

The language attribute is deprecated, type is required.

** If i leave the "<meta ..." line out, no difference is seen; the two
HTML progs still work differently.
Same difference whether IE or NS is used.
<!--

Never use HTML comments inside script elements.

** I just copied what i saw elsewhwere..

if (document.image s) {
var onef = new Image();
onef.src = "om2.gif";
var oneo = new Image();
oneo.src = "om22.gif";
}

function act(imgName) {
if (document.image s)
document[imgName].src = eval(imgName + "o.src");

The use of eval here is totally unnecessary:

** Again, I just copied what i saw elsewhwere..

document[imgName].src = imgName + "o.src";

}

function inact(imgName) {
if (document.image s)
document[imgName].src = eval(imgName + "f.src");

document[imgName].src = imgName + "f.src";

}
// -->
</SCRIPT>

<body centered

There is no 'centered' attribute in HTML 4.

** Maybe, but i have seen it and it works for IE and NS.
But i could use absolute position and hand calculate the proper point.
style="position : centered; height: 431px; width: 760px;" >
<img SRC="Usa52.gif" height="431" width="760" BORDER="0" ALT="USA map">
</BODY>

Here your body element is closed, no further HTML elements are allowed,
all that can follow is a closing </HTML> tag.

<div style="position ; absolute; top: 55px; left: 257px; "
<img style = "" border="0" alt="X" >
<A onMouseOver="ac t('one')"
onMouseOut="ina ct('one')" />

Is this some kind of pseudo XHTML? An A element can't be empty (i.e. it
must have a tag pair), don't use an XHTML tag closure - remove the '/'.

** Meant to be HTML; will make fixes as you suggest.

<IMG SRC="om2.gif" NAME="one" BORDER="0" ALT="black X"></A>

Why not put the mouseover on the image itself?

<img src='om2.gif' onmouseover="th is.src='om22.gi f';"
onmouseout="thi s.src='om2.gif' ;" ... >
Mouseovers are frequently done with CSS now as it's more efficient than
pre-loading images, investigate that. If your document is small and
only has two images, pre-loading seems pointless.

** CSS? what is that? would rather kiss as much as possible, as i know
so little.
And the app will have a fair number of good-sized images.


[...]

Apr 10 '06 #3
Robert Baer said on 10/04/2006 11:48 AM AEST:
RobG wrote:
Robert Baer said on 10/04/2006 9:36 AM AEST:
<SWM.HTM listing; does not work; positioning wrong (below main GIF)>
<!-- IE adds a horizontal 4-icon strip near the upper left
corner when that area is visited (WTF?) -->
I guess that is IE's image toolbar. You can turn it off/on in:

Tools->Internet options->Advanced->Multimedia->Enable image toolbar


*** Oh; thanks.

Is there a question here? If you wondering why your page behaves
strangely, you need to start with valid HTML. You have invalid
attributes and elements outside the body element. What various
browsers do with it will likely be different (or maybe not).


** Well, right or wrong, the first one does not work, and the second one
does and ther is no meaningful difference.


There is, it is the '/' at the end of the opening A tag in the first
(non-working) version. Your HTML is 'tag soup', that is, the browser
has not been given a DOCTYPE so it must guess how to interpret the
markup. It also encounters a variety of invalid attributes and markup,
so it will use 'quirksmode', which is used whenever the browser is
utterly confused as to what the markup is supposed to do and does its
best to display something.

That is the question.
It was answered - your awful markup was the issue. You can validate
markup here:

<URL:http://validator.w3.or g/>
Keep working at it until you get "This document is valid...". Work on
the first couple of errors each time, often they will cause cascading
errors elsewhere that go away when you fix the first ones.

By the time you get a valid document you will have learned a lot about
HTML. There is also a CSS validator when you get around to that.

However, making fixed is very helpful.
"invalid attributes and elements": i do not have a clue where or what
should be.
Use the W3C validator and HTML specification.

It's the dancing bear syndrome: wonder not how well the bear dances,
but that it dances at all. :-)

<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html;
charset=iso-8859-1">
<title>Stripp er wells and production</title>
</head>

<SCRIPT LANGUAGE="JavaS cript">


The language attribute is deprecated, type is required.


** If i leave the "<meta ..." line out, no difference is seen; the two


The meta tag is irrelevant here, as you've discovered. It's purpose is
largely for validation and fallback if the server fails to set the
content type (the server should always set it).

HTML progs still work differently.
Same difference whether IE or NS is used.
Because your markup is so full of errors that whatever various browsers
may make of it is likely different. And there are different errors in
the two examples you posted.

There are lots of browsers other than IE and Netscape Navigator.

[...]

There is no 'centered' attribute in HTML 4.


** Maybe, but i have seen it and it works for IE and NS.
But i could use absolute position and hand calculate the proper point.


There is no requirement to do that. You don't know how wide the window
is and you don't need to know. Learn more about HTML and CSS, ask such
questions in a relevant new group. But before you do, search their
archives and find other posts that ask the same question.

HTML:
news:comp.infos ystems.www.authoring.html

CSS:
comp.infosystem s.www.authoring.stylesheets
Some readers there aren't very tolerant of newbies, persist anyway.
[...]
Mouseovers are frequently done with CSS now as it's more efficient
than pre-loading images, investigate that. If your document is small
and only has two images, pre-loading seems pointless.


** CSS? what is that? would rather kiss as much as possible, as i know
so little.


Be careful what you kiss, it may bite :-)

And the app will have a fair number of good-sized images.


Below is an example of what I was referring to, it may not be suitable
for you. Follow-up in a CSS group:

<URL:http://wellstyled.com/css-nopreload-rollovers.html>
Abusing an A element this way is only necessary because IE doesn't
support hover on other elements - but that will change with IE 7 I think.

Poke around alistapart, most of it is pretty good.

<UR:http://www.alistapart. com/>
Here is a brief, valid, document with an image that stays centered
regardless of what size the browser window is (provided there's room of
course):
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
<html>
<head>
<title>Center Image</title>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type"
content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1">

<style type="text/css">
#centerImage {text-align: center;}
</style>

</head>
<body>
<div id="centerImage "><img src="a.gif" alt=""></div>
</body>
</html>

--
Rob
Group FAQ: <URL:http://www.jibbering.c om/FAQ>
Apr 10 '06 #4
RobG <rg***@iinet.ne t.au> writes:
Robert Baer said on 10/04/2006 9:36 AM AEST:

var onef = new Image();
onef.src = "om2.gif";
var oneo = new Image();
oneo.src = "om22.gif"; .... document[imgName].src = eval(imgName + "o.src");


The use of eval here is totally unnecessary:

document[imgName].src = imgName + "o.src";


Sadly not. The eval in this case is the difference between assigning
"oneo.src" and "om22.gif" to the src-attribute of the image with
name "one".

Eval should be avoided, and it can be, but not by simply omitting it
(well, at least not in this case, though too often it really is
completely unnecessary).

Instead the different values that needs to be looked up should be stored
in a structure that allows lookup, and not just as variables with
significant names. E.g.:

var imgs = {one: { o: "omg22.gif" , f: "omg2.gif"} };
/* object literal notation equivalent to:
var imgs = new Object();
imgs["one"] = new Object(); // or: imgs.one = new Object();
imgs["one"].f = "img2.gif";
imgs["one"].o = "img22.gif" ;
*/
.....
document[imgName].src = imgs[imgName].o;

The original code combined crating variables to store URLs of images
and preloading those images. That's not necessary. Instead just add a
preloader that uses the same data to find the URL's to load:

for(var i in imgs) {
var of = imgs[i];
(new Image()).src = of.o;
(new Image()).src = of.f;
}

/L
--
Lasse Reichstein Nielsen - lr*@hotpop.com
DHTML Death Colors: <URL:http://www.infimum.dk/HTML/rasterTriangleD OM.html>
'Faith without judgement merely degrades the spirit divine.'
Apr 10 '06 #5
RobG wrote:
Robert Baer said on 10/04/2006 11:48 AM AEST:
RobG wrote:
Robert Baer said on 10/04/2006 9:36 AM AEST:

<SWM.HTM listing; does not work; positioning wrong (below main GIF)>
<!-- IE adds a horizontal 4-icon strip near the upper left
corner when that area is visited (WTF?) -->


I guess that is IE's image toolbar. You can turn it off/on in:

Tools->Internet options->Advanced->Multimedia->Enable image toolbar

*** Oh; thanks.

Is there a question here? If you wondering why your page behaves
strangely, you need to start with valid HTML. You have invalid
attributes and elements outside the body element. What various
browsers do with it will likely be different (or maybe not).

** Well, right or wrong, the first one does not work, and the second
one does and ther is no meaningful difference.

There is, it is the '/' at the end of the opening A tag in the first
(non-working) version. Your HTML is 'tag soup', that is, the browser
has not been given a DOCTYPE so it must guess how to interpret the
markup. It also encounters a variety of invalid attributes and markup,
so it will use 'quirksmode', which is used whenever the browser is
utterly confused as to what the markup is supposed to do and does its
best to display something.

That is the question.

It was answered - your awful markup was the issue. You can validate
markup here:

<URL:http://validator.w3.or g/>
Keep working at it until you get "This document is valid...". Work on
the first couple of errors each time, often they will cause cascading
errors elsewhere that go away when you fix the first ones.

By the time you get a valid document you will have learned a lot about
HTML. There is also a CSS validator when you get around to that.

However, making fixed is very helpful.
"invalid attributes and elements": i do not have a clue where or
what should be.

Use the W3C validator and HTML specification.

It's the dancing bear syndrome: wonder not how well the bear dances,
but that it dances at all. :-)
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html;
charset=iso-8859-1">
<title>Stripp er wells and production</title>
</head>

<SCRIPT LANGUAGE="JavaS cript">


The language attribute is deprecated, type is required.

** If i leave the "<meta ..." line out, no difference is seen; the two

The meta tag is irrelevant here, as you've discovered. It's purpose is
largely for validation and fallback if the server fails to set the
content type (the server should always set it).

HTML progs still work differently.
Same difference whether IE or NS is used.

Because your markup is so full of errors that whatever various browsers
may make of it is likely different. And there are different errors in
the two examples you posted.

There are lots of browsers other than IE and Netscape Navigator.

[...]

There is no 'centered' attribute in HTML 4.

** Maybe, but i have seen it and it works for IE and NS.
But i could use absolute position and hand calculate the proper point.

There is no requirement to do that. You don't know how wide the window
is and you don't need to know. Learn more about HTML and CSS, ask such
questions in a relevant new group. But before you do, search their
archives and find other posts that ask the same question.

HTML:
news:comp.infos ystems.www.authoring.html

CSS:
comp.infosystem s.www.authoring.stylesheets
Some readers there aren't very tolerant of newbies, persist anyway.
[...]
Mouseovers are frequently done with CSS now as it's more efficient
than pre-loading images, investigate that. If your document is small
and only has two images, pre-loading seems pointless.

** CSS? what is that? would rather kiss as much as possible, as i know
so little.

Be careful what you kiss, it may bite :-)

And the app will have a fair number of good-sized images.

Below is an example of what I was referring to, it may not be suitable
for you. Follow-up in a CSS group:

<URL:http://wellstyled.com/css-nopreload-rollovers.html>
Abusing an A element this way is only necessary because IE doesn't
support hover on other elements - but that will change with IE 7 I think.

Poke around alistapart, most of it is pretty good.

<UR:http://www.alistapart. com/>
Here is a brief, valid, document with an image that stays centered
regardless of what size the browser window is (provided there's room of
course):
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
<html>
<head>
<title>Center Image</title>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type"
content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1">

<style type="text/css">
#centerImage {text-align: center;}
</style>

</head>
<body>
<div id="centerImage "><img src="a.gif" alt=""></div>
</body>
</html>

I made the changes you suggested on both files, and the "working" one
still works and is !less! that 12 lines of code!!
---And no JavaScript!
I dare say that the trick(s?) you mentioned cannot be found in any
on-line HTML tutorial.
But the non-working one still would not work, and looked exactly the
same.
I pressed the DOS FC utility to work on them, and there were two
areas it complained about, and visually, those areas were absolutely
identical.
I am guessing that the bad file had embedded control characters or
hex255 (which is just as invisible as a space).
I did not look at the bad file in hex mode; i was so disgusted that i
just tossed it.
So, the next step is to use that nifty utility.
Thanks!
Apr 10 '06 #6
Lasse Reichstein Nielsen wrote:
RobG <rg***@iinet.ne t.au> writes:

Robert Baer said on 10/04/2006 9:36 AM AEST:


var onef = new Image();
onef.src = "om2.gif";
var oneo = new Image();
oneo.src = "om22.gif";
...
document[imgName].src = eval(imgName + "o.src");


The use of eval here is totally unnecessary:

document[imgName].src = imgName + "o.src";

Sadly not. The eval in this case is the difference between assigning
"oneo.src" and "om22.gif" to the src-attribute of the image with
name "one".

Eval should be avoided, and it can be, but not by simply omitting it
(well, at least not in this case, though too often it really is
completely unnecessary).

Instead the different values that needs to be looked up should be stored
in a structure that allows lookup, and not just as variables with
significant names. E.g.:

var imgs = {one: { o: "omg22.gif" , f: "omg2.gif"} };
/* object literal notation equivalent to:
var imgs = new Object();
imgs["one"] = new Object(); // or: imgs.one = new Object();
imgs["one"].f = "img2.gif";
imgs["one"].o = "img22.gif" ;
*/
....
document[imgName].src = imgs[imgName].o;

The original code combined crating variables to store URLs of images
and preloading those images. That's not necessary. Instead just add a
preloader that uses the same data to find the URL's to load:

for(var i in imgs) {
var of = imgs[i];
(new Image()).src = of.o;
(new Image()).src = of.f;
}

/L

Yes; i discovered the hard way that "eval" was necessary.
The scheme you gave may be more fundamental or generic or "pure" but
since i know almost nothing about JavaScript (or HTML either), what you
gave is rather confusing to me.
So i hope that you are not too upset if i stick with what i had, as
that scheme was found on the web a few places as sample code and it
looks simple to me (i am maybe too simple-minded).
But i do thank you for giving an alternate.

Apr 10 '06 #7
Lasse Reichstein Nielsen said on 10/04/2006 4:56 PM AEST:
RobG <rg***@iinet.ne t.au> writes: [...]
document[imgName].src = eval(imgName + "o.src");


The use of eval here is totally unnecessary:

document[imgName].src = imgName + "o.src";

Sadly not. The eval in this case is the difference between assigning
"oneo.src" and "om22.gif" to the src-attribute of the image with
name "one".


Ooops! I think I suffered from error-correction overload. Using
'o.src' will not work at all, I think the OP meant 'oneo.src' as you've
pointed out. So two errors for the price of one. ;-)

[...]
The original code combined crating variables to store URLs of images
and preloading those images. That's not necessary. Instead just add a
preloader that uses the same data to find the URL's to load:

for(var i in imgs) {
var of = imgs[i];
(new Image()).src = of.o;
(new Image()).src = of.f;
}


Good idea.
--
Rob
Group FAQ: <URL:http://www.jibbering.c om/FAQ>
Apr 10 '06 #8
Lasse Reichstein Nielsen wrote:
The original code combined crating variables to store URLs of images
and preloading those images. That's not necessary.
IBTD.
Instead just add a preloader that uses the same data to find the URL's
to load:

for(var i in imgs) {
var of = imgs[i];
(new Image()).src = of.o;
(new Image()).src = of.f;
}


I do not think this is a Good Idea. The very point of preloading is to
keep resources in the cache as long as possible. It is unlikely that
created and almost immediately garbage-collected Image objects would
facilitate that in a cross-browser way.
PointedEars
Apr 10 '06 #9
Thomas 'PointedEars' Lahn <Po*********@we b.de> writes:
Lasse Reichstein Nielsen wrote:
Instead just add a preloader that uses the same data to find the URL's
to load: [loop of] (new Image()).src = of.o;
(new Image()).src = of.f;

I do not think this is a Good Idea. The very point of preloading is to
keep resources in the cache as long as possible. It is unlikely that
created and almost immediately garbage-collected Image objects would
facilitate that in a cross-browser way.


I have yet to see a browser where this didn't load the image into the
browser cache. If you want to be certain that the Image object isn't
garbage collected before the image is loaded, just store it somewhere,
i.e.,

var store = [], storeindex = 0;
[loop over data structure:]
(store[i++]=new Image()).src = of.o
(store[i++]=new Image()).src = of.f

It still keeps preloading and lookup data structure separated. Keep
the store array for as long as you want to avoid garbage collection
(but when the image is first in the browsers cache, it'll probably
stay there for a while, independently of whether any page is currently
using it).

One kind of magic thinking that goes around is that you should read
the URL back out from the image objects' src attributes. That does
nothing that just using the URL from anywhere else doesn't do too.

/L
--
Lasse Reichstein Nielsen - lr*@hotpop.com
DHTML Death Colors: <URL:http://www.infimum.dk/HTML/rasterTriangleD OM.html>
'Faith without judgement merely degrades the spirit divine.'
Apr 10 '06 #10

This thread has been closed and replies have been disabled. Please start a new discussion.

Similar topics

3
1562
by: AbeR | last post by:
I have written a fairly simple reporting app that has been working for a few years without any issues until this past week. The application has a login page with a DSN lookup for login/password validation. A confirm login asp page does a redirect back to the login page if failed or to a menu page if passed where I pull information from the database into session variables that I pass throught the app for dynamic/individualized queries I...
1
1923
by: Ellen Manning | last post by:
I've got an A2K continuous form based on a query of 2 tables. The query returns results if the field "Outstanding" = Yes. The form's recordset type is set to Inconsistent Updates. If the user changes "Outstanding" to No, then the form automatically refreshes itself, displaying only the records with Outstanding set to Yes. How do I stop this automatic refreshing? I want the records the user may change to No to stay on the form. ...
0
1184
by: bjbounce2002 | last post by:
Hello, I have a field containing OLE Objects in Access 97. The OLE Objects are links to Microsoft Word templates. I have a parameter query which uses criteria Like "*" & & "*" to bring up word files which contain a certain text. This does not bring up all results for some reason as there are template letters (.dot) which I know contain the text but are not appearing in the results.
0
1616
by: Itai | last post by:
Background: I have four Web Form pages with respective C# code behind files, all in the same project: localhost/vpath1 Page1.aspx Page2.aspx
2
3342
by: HCF_15 | last post by:
Hi all, I have a small piece of code to use StackFrame to GetMethod, I found it is inconsistent in Debug version and Release version, is there anything I am doing wrong? Here is code, build in Debug and Release version, you will get different results. My env. is VS 2005 on XP with SP2. Thanks in advanced.
2
2589
by: robert maas, see http://tinyurl.com/uh3t | last post by:
(second attempt) I'm just a beginner at perl. Currently I'm comparing how integers are supported in several different programming languages: <http://www.rawbw.com/~rem/HelloPlus/CookBook/CookTop.html#int> I wrote a test program in perl, but it gives inconsistent results. Here's the program source: #!/usr/bin/perl $a = 'Hello'; $b = 'world.';
20
2599
by: Francine.Neary | last post by:
I am learning C, having fun with strings & pointers at the moment! The following program is my solution to an exercise to take an input, strip the first word, and output the rest. It works fine when you give it 2 or more words, but when there's only 1 word the results vary depending on whether it's on Windows or Linux: under MSVC it displays no output (as it should); under gcc/Linux it instead gives "Segmentation fault". Any ideas...
1
4268
by: catudalg | last post by:
Configuration: Windows 2000 sp3 MS Access 2000 (9.0.4402 SR-1) Visual Foxpro 9.0 detached tables MS VFP Driver 6.01.6830.01 06/19/2003 For example, a simple query like: select * from ddwg1 union all select * from ddwg2
3
6186
by: Rahul Babbar | last post by:
Hi All, When could be the possible reasons that could make a database inconsistent? I was told by somebody that it could become inconsistent if you " force all the applications to a close on that database and transactions are not committed or rollbacked" I infact, don't believe it, because i suppose when we do a "force
1
3277
by: rnhuch | last post by:
My platform is SQL Server 2005. One of the tables of my db has 28589928 rows and one of the fields is real. When I backup and restore this database to another server (using the SQL Server internal tool) and do a SELECT SUM(<<field name>>) from <<table name>>, the results from these two servers are slightly different. I don't understand the reason because these databases are static and they should be exactly the same. Then when I tried...
0
8246
Oralloy
by: Oralloy | last post by:
Hello folks, I am unable to find appropriate documentation on the type promotion of bit-fields when using the generalised comparison operator "<=>". The problem is that using the GNU compilers, it seems that the internal comparison operator "<=>" tries to promote arguments from unsigned to signed. This is as boiled down as I can make it. Here is my compilation command: g++-12 -std=c++20 -Wnarrowing bit_field.cpp Here is the code in...
1
8000
by: Hystou | last post by:
Overview: Windows 11 and 10 have less user interface control over operating system update behaviour than previous versions of Windows. In Windows 11 and 10, there is no way to turn off the Windows Update option using the Control Panel or Settings app; it automatically checks for updates and installs any it finds, whether you like it or not. For most users, this new feature is actually very convenient. If you want to control the update process,...
0
6652
agi2029
by: agi2029 | last post by:
Let's talk about the concept of autonomous AI software engineers and no-code agents. These AIs are designed to manage the entire lifecycle of a software development project—planning, coding, testing, and deployment—without human intervention. Imagine an AI that can take a project description, break it down, write the code, debug it, and then launch it, all on its own.... Now, this would greatly impact the work of software developers. The idea...
1
5738
isladogs
by: isladogs | last post by:
The next Access Europe User Group meeting will be on Wednesday 1 May 2024 starting at 18:00 UK time (6PM UTC+1) and finishing by 19:30 (7.30PM). In this session, we are pleased to welcome a new presenter, Adolph Dupré who will be discussing some powerful techniques for using class modules. He will explain when you may want to use classes instead of User Defined Types (UDT). For example, to manage the data in unbound forms. Adolph will...
0
5404
by: conductexam | last post by:
I have .net C# application in which I am extracting data from word file and save it in database particularly. To store word all data as it is I am converting the whole word file firstly in HTML and then checking html paragraph one by one. At the time of converting from word file to html my equations which are in the word document file was convert into image. Globals.ThisAddIn.Application.ActiveDocument.Select();...
0
3854
by: TSSRALBI | last post by:
Hello I'm a network technician in training and I need your help. I am currently learning how to create and manage the different types of VPNs and I have a question about LAN-to-LAN VPNs. The last exercise I practiced was to create a LAN-to-LAN VPN between two Pfsense firewalls, by using IPSEC protocols. I succeeded, with both firewalls in the same network. But I'm wondering if it's possible to do the same thing, with 2 Pfsense firewalls...
0
3895
by: adsilva | last post by:
A Windows Forms form does not have the event Unload, like VB6. What one acts like?
1
2383
by: 6302768590 | last post by:
Hai team i want code for transfer the data from one system to another through IP address by using C# our system has to for every 5mins then we have to update the data what the data is updated we have to send another system
0
1205
bsmnconsultancy
by: bsmnconsultancy | last post by:
In today's digital era, a well-designed website is crucial for businesses looking to succeed. Whether you're a small business owner or a large corporation in Toronto, having a strong online presence can significantly impact your brand's success. BSMN Consultancy, a leader in Website Development in Toronto offers valuable insights into creating effective websites that not only look great but also perform exceptionally well. In this comprehensive...

By using Bytes.com and it's services, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

To disable or enable advertisements and analytics tracking please visit the manage ads & tracking page.