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I just want to say Java needs a new mascot

P: 1
I'm drunk after 5 beers and I just want to say Java really needs a new mascot or a 2020 version of this fucking Duke thing. I mean, what is this thing anyway. Look at this cute Gopher golang has or GitHub's magical octocat



We need to rethink guys
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3 Weeks Ago #1
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Banfa
Expert Mod 5K+
P: 8,950
Programming languages do not need mascots, they need dedicated nerds willing to stay up all night producing uncompromising code.

They also need to not be constantly being "improved" with new features.
They also need to not have some global mega corp trying to monetise there use

:D 😁
3 Weeks Ago #2

Expert 100+
P: 260
In my view, every language has its own qualities which makes it unique and choosable for building something.

Look at this cute Gopher golang has or GitHub's magical octocat
What actually are you referring to here about Go?
3 Weeks Ago #3

Banfa
Expert Mod 5K+
P: 8,950
I would like to add that my comments were not all aimed at Java.

Also I suspect you haven't considered the full range of languages out there 1600+, some are not chooseable, or at least not sensibly because they have been superseded e.g B or they were never intended to be a sensible choice e.g Malbolge
3 Weeks Ago #4

Expert 100+
P: 260
Glad you pointed that out. Obviously there's no point in using obsolete technologies. I meant the comparisons between the languages that are in use presently. Such as choosing Java where the priorities are security and because of its feature of being platform-independent. Using C/C++ where low-level interaction is required. Choosing scripting language like python to quickly get something done in a faster manner with easy to use syntax. That's just how I view them.
3 Weeks Ago #5

Banfa
Expert Mod 5K+
P: 8,950
That is certainly true, but personal bias plays a big part too because most of these languages can all do 90% of everything 😀 and thus you get arguments about which is the best language when in reality they'll all do.
3 Weeks Ago #6

Expert 100+
P: 260
So so true. I guess this self-biased choice is something that leads to (or more like a contributing factor) the discussions of type 'why x is better than y'. It's good to hear both sides but I think there isn't a final conclusion to such. x could be better than y in certain aspects but the same applies to y too. Better stop blaming the technology as most of the things can be done plus there are always workarounds. Also reminds me of discussions of type 'windows is better than Linux', 'oop is bad', etc. OOP may not be suitable for building simple features as it may result in a minuscule return on investment, but the idea of representing everything relating to the real world introduces a new level of easiness in the workflow.

I think pretty much everything has copied/is copying every other thing. It doesn't take much time to see the reflections of a popular feature of something to be made available in others in one way or another via updates. Sometimes it may come out in an innovative form. Java copied OO syntax from C++ and garbage collection from Lisp, C# cloned the heck out of Java, etc. For example, a web app can be made using ruby or python or java or C# or Go or JS or C or C++ or rust or haskell or perl or pascal or COBOL etc, like anything can do the same. Lots of varieties and hence depends on the taste of the developer.
3 Weeks Ago #7

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