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Code write \ code review productivity

P: n/a
Hi.

Can somebody refer me to resource with specified/analyzed/approximated
productivity in Java coding and Java code review tasks? Coding
productivity is more described in the net, but I didn't find anything
about code review productivity...

Thanks,
V
Jul 17 '05 #1
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3 Replies


P: n/a
Volodymyr Sadovyy wrote:
Hi.

Can somebody refer me to resource with specified/analyzed/approximated
productivity in Java coding and Java code review tasks? Coding
productivity is more described in the net, but I didn't find anything
about code review productivity...

Thanks,
V

Seems like there is a tool called Klockwork can do help to you. You can
search from google.
Jul 17 '05 #2

P: n/a
On Fri, 23 Apr 2004 11:34:41 +0300, Volodymyr Sadovyy
<vsadovyy_@_hotmail.com> wrote or quoted :
Can somebody refer me to resource with specified/analyzed/approximated
productivity in Java coding and Java code review tasks? Coding
productivity is more described in the net, but I didn't find anything
about code review productivity...


There are two sorts of question you want to know:

1. how productive is this person capable of being?

2. is this person slacking off?
The first can be answered by given each person to be measured the same
task. At the end of the day you measure the quality (smaller is
better), and % complete.

The second can be measured by asking several people to estimate time
on each task, and also statistically measuring how much over/under
each person is when he is actually assigned that task. You have to do
this over months.

The problem with the sorts of productivity measures I have seen, is
they encourage verbose pedestrian solutions to crank up the line
count.
They also discourage putting in time now to save time later in
maintenance.
--
Canadian Mind Products, Roedy Green.
Coaching, problem solving, economical contract programming.
See http://mindprod.com/jgloss/jgloss.html for The Java Glossary.
Jul 17 '05 #3

P: n/a
Roedy Green wrote:
On Fri, 23 Apr 2004 11:34:41 +0300, Volodymyr Sadovyy
<vsadovyy_@_hotmail.com> wrote or quoted :

Can somebody refer me to resource with specified/analyzed/approximated
productivity in Java coding and Java code review tasks? Coding
productivity is more described in the net, but I didn't find anything
about code review productivity...

There are two sorts of question you want to know:

1. how productive is this person capable of being?

2. is this person slacking off?
The first can be answered by given each person to be measured the same
task. At the end of the day you measure the quality (smaller is
better), and % complete.


Nonsense. Size and quality of code are almost unrelated. % complete
can be very difficult to measure in any meaningful way.
The second can be measured by asking several people to estimate time
on each task, and also statistically measuring how much over/under
each person is when he is actually assigned that task. You have to do
this over months.
Also nonsense. The fact that one person estimates too aggressively,
while another sandbags, does not mean either is slacking off.
Interestingly, this test seems to be a decent way of measuring the
answer to #1: How long does it take for a person to achieve some
quantifiable goal, e.g. a certain level of testable functionality in code?
The problem with the sorts of productivity measures I have seen, is
they encourage verbose pedestrian solutions to crank up the line
count.
They also discourage putting in time now to save time later in
maintenance.

Jul 17 '05 #4

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