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Offer your suggestions for a website to help translate between windows, linux, java

P: n/a
Hello-

I, the inquirydog, would like to solicit suggestions for a new
web page I am making:

I am creating a simple website that will translate concepts
between windows os's, Linux, and the Java language with all of its
related technologies. The website is at
http://members.dslextreme.com/users/inquirydog, and is a mock-version
of the Rosetta stone, which indicates concepts from each "platform"
(or virtual platform in the case of Java) near each other. The list
is presently tiny, but I am sure that many items could be added.

I am making this website because I myself am familiar with
Linux, and have been put into situations that I need to understand the
other two platforms. It can take a long time to find this
information, and I believe that this page will eventually be useful to
others in the same situation. I would be interested in getting
suggestions for other lines in this "Rosetta Stone", for information
about what can be filled into the blank spaces, and for corrections to
any errors that exist. In some cases the analogy might break down,
ie- Java isn't really a platform and as such there is no standard
"java" version of notepad or emacs, but as the development world seems
to be predominantly broken apart into these three areas, I believe
this is a good comparison to make.

thanks
-Inquirydog
Jul 17 '05 #1
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4 Replies


P: n/a
On Mon, 05 Jan 2004 16:36:10 -0800, inquirydog wrote:
I am creating a simple website that will translate concepts between
windows os's, Linux, and the Java language with all of its related
technologies.


How are you going to "translate concepts" between a programming
language and an operating system? What are all the related
technologies?

Sybren
--
(o_ Q: God, root, what is difference?
//\ A: God can change the byte order on the CPU, root can't.
V_/_
Jul 17 '05 #2

P: n/a
Hello-
I am creating a simple website that will translate concepts between
windows os's, Linux, and the Java language with all of its related
technologies.


How are you going to "translate concepts" between a programming
language and an operating system? What are all the related
technologies?

Glad you asked!

At first sight the comparison between windows/linux and Java
may seem weird, but ultimately I believe that given the current state
of computing this is a very useful comparison. In my last couple of
years in IT it has come to my attention that most of the people I have
met are experts/do most of their work in either Linux, Windows, or
Java. These are technologies that

1). are all independent of one another,

2). are based on a particular "kernel" (kernel for Linux and
Windows, the JVM for Java),

3). have their own typical programming languages (c, c++,
perl, Python, Bash for Linux, Visual Studio languages for Windows, and
the java programming language for Java),

4). have their own standard tools (gcc, make, strace, etc for
Linux, Visual tools for Windows, javac, java for java),

As a Linux guy, I have had to do some stuff in the Windows and
Java world lately. The thing that occurred to me as I was reading up
on those subjects is that most of what I was learning was not
conceptually new, but rather just a new syntax on old concepts. Most
books however focus on the concepts, which makes the learning of the
new subject tedious (ie- I don't want to have to read through a
descussion of what the "component model" is, I already know that from
Corba. Just tell me that com is similar to corba, and I have a great
starting point to understand haw I can use it).

The analogy is of course not perfect- Java is one language
with many tools built around it, while windows and linux are a bunch
of tools (ie- an operating system) with many languages built around
them. Some of the tools native to linux (ie- vi) can be used on a
windows operating system, but typically are not. Some concepts native
to an operating system (ie- filesystems, ls, etc) don't make much
sense when discussing Java. But there is enough overlap that I
believe that the comparison not only makes sense but also provides a
great paradigm under which to quickly grasp the differences between
the three technologies. In fact, by pointing out the places where the
analogy fails you can quickly grasp the conceptual differences.

You may ask me why I don't even go further- .net should have
its own column, perhaps even html/javascript or xml. I chose those
three primarily because it represents the fundamental breakdown that I
see existing today in enterprise quality, efficient, turing complete
development technologies. When I was in charge of hiring for my
former company, you could see it in the resumes, you could almost
"bin" each incoming into one of three piles: "Java expert", "Windows
expert", "Linux expert", and at the bookstore you can physically see
the section set apart from each other "Windows programming", "Java
programming", "Unix programming".

At any rate, I would find such a list extremely useful, and I
assume others would also. Even a further discussion on why you do not
think that such a list is sensible at all would be enlightening,
furthering understanding.

thanks
-Inquirydog
Jul 17 '05 #3

P: n/a
On Tue, 06 Jan 2004 12:49:37 -0800, inquirydog wrote:
These are technologies that

1). are all independent of one another,
Since when is Java independent of the OS it runs on? Many facets are,
but not all by a long shot.
3). have their own typical programming languages (c, c++, perl,
Python, Bash for Linux, Visual Studio languages for Windows, and
the java programming language for Java),
But then again, C, C++, Perl and Python are using in Windows as well.
As a Linux guy, I have had to do some stuff in the Windows
[...] world lately.
You must have felt soo bad.
Most books however focus on the concepts, which makes the learning
of the new subject tedious
I know the feeling...
At any rate, I would find such a list extremely useful, and I
assume others would also.


I hope you succeed, as such a list would indeed proof itself to be
useful, as long as it is constructed in a proper way. Let us know how
things work out!

Sybren
--
(o_ Q: God, root, what is difference?
//\ A: God can change the byte order on the CPU, root can't.
V_/_
Jul 17 '05 #4

P: n/a
in********@hotmail.com (inquirydog) wrote in message news:<80**************************@posting.google. com>...
Hello-

I, the inquirydog, would like to solicit suggestions for a new
web page I am making:

[snipped...]

The main problem is that there are few terms which translate directly.
A .class file is not really directly comparable to a .dll as such -
although there is a fair bit of overlap; /etc is not a registry like
the one on Windows, Mozilla spans many platforms, not just Unix; $PATH
and the Java classpath are not the same thing; and /usr and $CLASSPATH
are *certainly* not the same thing!; the internet is not the same as
MSDN which in turn is not the same as java.sun.com; gcc and javac are
available on multiple platforms... and so on.

Its a nice idea, but I suspect such a crude mapping of terms is likely
to create more confusion than it solves. As the terms in each column
don't map exactly to one another, the only way to understand why part-
icular terms have been grouped together is to understand which aspect
of them is being compared (you have to know what concept links the
terms in a row to make sense of the table, and if you know what links
the terms then you don't actually need the table! ;-)
-FISH- ><>
Jul 17 '05 #5

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