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simple beginners question

P: n/a
Hello,
I just got the SUN Java IDE. (Netbeans IDE 3.5.1)
Very very nice, and I worked myself through the tutorial (about making a
colorswitch).

Now, When I compile it gives no errors at all. So far so good.
But when I want to execute, it askes to "set project main class".
The only option it displays is the default project. But the "okay" button
won't highlight.
I cannot select anything else, nor can I roam directories to select
anything.

Can someone please help me out.
I feel kinda silly not even knowing how to start a kind of hello-world
applet. ;-)

best regards,
martin
Jul 17 '05 #1
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10 Replies


P: n/a
I strongly suggest that you learn Java, and not NetBeans.
Integrated Development Environments are intended for use by competent
developers only, since they hide many of the details of what is actually
happening, and it is assumed that the user can determine what that is.
Clearly, in this case, you can't.
Grab the Sun SDK and a decent text editor and get cracking.

--
Tony Morris
(BInfTech, Cert 3 I.T., SCJP[1.4], SCJD)
Software Engineer
IBM Australia - Tivoli Security Software

"martin" <no****@nowhere.org> wrote in message
news:bs**********@reader10.wxs.nl...
Hello,
I just got the SUN Java IDE. (Netbeans IDE 3.5.1)
Very very nice, and I worked myself through the tutorial (about making a
colorswitch).

Now, When I compile it gives no errors at all. So far so good.
But when I want to execute, it askes to "set project main class".
The only option it displays is the default project. But the "okay" button
won't highlight.
I cannot select anything else, nor can I roam directories to select
anything.

Can someone please help me out.
I feel kinda silly not even knowing how to start a kind of hello-world
applet. ;-)

best regards,
martin

Jul 17 '05 #2

P: n/a
Any good suggestions for a good online tutorial on Java?
martin

"Tony Morris" <di******@optusnet.com.au> wrote in message
news:3f***********************@news.optusnet.com.a u...
I strongly suggest that you learn Java, and not NetBeans.
Integrated Development Environments are intended for use by competent
developers only, since they hide many of the details of what is actually
happening, and it is assumed that the user can determine what that is.
Clearly, in this case, you can't.
Grab the Sun SDK and a decent text editor and get cracking.

--
Tony Morris
(BInfTech, Cert 3 I.T., SCJP[1.4], SCJD)
Software Engineer
IBM Australia - Tivoli Security Software

"martin" <no****@nowhere.org> wrote in message
news:bs**********@reader10.wxs.nl...
Hello,
I just got the SUN Java IDE. (Netbeans IDE 3.5.1)
Very very nice, and I worked myself through the tutorial (about making a
colorswitch).

Now, When I compile it gives no errors at all. So far so good.
But when I want to execute, it askes to "set project main class".
The only option it displays is the default project. But the "okay" button won't highlight.
I cannot select anything else, nor can I roam directories to select
anything.

Can someone please help me out.
I feel kinda silly not even knowing how to start a kind of hello-world
applet. ;-)

best regards,
martin


Jul 17 '05 #3

P: n/a
"martin" <no****@nowhere.org> wrote in message
news:bs**********@reader10.wxs.nl...
Any good suggestions for a good online tutorial on Java?
martin

"Tony Morris" <di******@optusnet.com.au> wrote in message
news:3f***********************@news.optusnet.com.a u...
I strongly suggest that you learn Java, and not NetBeans.
Integrated Development Environments are intended for use by competent
developers only, since they hide many of the details of what is actually
happening, and it is assumed that the user can determine what that is.
Clearly, in this case, you can't.
Grab the Sun SDK and a decent text editor and get cracking.

--
Tony Morris
(BInfTech, Cert 3 I.T., SCJP[1.4], SCJD)
Software Engineer
IBM Australia - Tivoli Security Software

"martin" <no****@nowhere.org> wrote in message
news:bs**********@reader10.wxs.nl...
Hello,
I just got the SUN Java IDE. (Netbeans IDE 3.5.1)
Very very nice, and I worked myself through the tutorial (about making a colorswitch).

Now, When I compile it gives no errors at all. So far so good.
But when I want to execute, it askes to "set project main class".
The only option it displays is the default project. But the "okay" button won't highlight.
I cannot select anything else, nor can I roam directories to select
anything.

Can someone please help me out.
I feel kinda silly not even knowing how to start a kind of hello-world
applet. ;-)

best regards,
martin



java.sun.com

Since they switched their site up, I don't know where the Java tutorial is
hiding.
Jul 17 '05 #4

P: n/a
Classes are not added to the 'project' by default.
Right click on each file and select Tools->Add To Project
The classes will then appear in the 'set project main class' dialog.

Alternatively just open the file with the main in and press F6 to execute.
Regards,

Jon.
"martin" <no****@nowhere.org> wrote in message
news:bs**********@reader10.wxs.nl...
Hello,
I just got the SUN Java IDE. (Netbeans IDE 3.5.1)
Very very nice, and I worked myself through the tutorial (about making a
colorswitch).

Now, When I compile it gives no errors at all. So far so good.
But when I want to execute, it askes to "set project main class".
The only option it displays is the default project. But the "okay" button
won't highlight.
I cannot select anything else, nor can I roam directories to select
anything.

Can someone please help me out.
I feel kinda silly not even knowing how to start a kind of hello-world
applet. ;-)

best regards,
martin

Jul 17 '05 #5

P: n/a
http://java.sun.com/tutorial

There is a "Getting Started" section, and also sections covering various
topics in detail.
A good to place to start !

--
Tony Morris
(BInfTech, Cert 3 I.T., SCJP[1.4], SCJD)
Software Engineer
IBM Australia - Tivoli Security Software

"martin" <no****@nowhere.org> wrote in message
news:bs**********@reader10.wxs.nl...
Any good suggestions for a good online tutorial on Java?
martin

"Tony Morris" <di******@optusnet.com.au> wrote in message
news:3f***********************@news.optusnet.com.a u...
I strongly suggest that you learn Java, and not NetBeans.
Integrated Development Environments are intended for use by competent
developers only, since they hide many of the details of what is actually
happening, and it is assumed that the user can determine what that is.
Clearly, in this case, you can't.
Grab the Sun SDK and a decent text editor and get cracking.

--
Tony Morris
(BInfTech, Cert 3 I.T., SCJP[1.4], SCJD)
Software Engineer
IBM Australia - Tivoli Security Software

"martin" <no****@nowhere.org> wrote in message
news:bs**********@reader10.wxs.nl...
Hello,
I just got the SUN Java IDE. (Netbeans IDE 3.5.1)
Very very nice, and I worked myself through the tutorial (about making a colorswitch).

Now, When I compile it gives no errors at all. So far so good.
But when I want to execute, it askes to "set project main class".
The only option it displays is the default project. But the "okay" button won't highlight.
I cannot select anything else, nor can I roam directories to select
anything.

Can someone please help me out.
I feel kinda silly not even knowing how to start a kind of hello-world
applet. ;-)

best regards,
martin



Jul 17 '05 #6

P: n/a
"Tony Morris" <di******@optusnet.com.au> wrote in message news:<3f***********************@news.optusnet.com. au>...
I strongly suggest that you learn Java, and not NetBeans.
Integrated Development Environments are intended for use by competent
developers only, since they hide many of the details of what is actually
happening, and it is assumed that the user can determine what that is.
Clearly, in this case, you can't.
Grab the Sun SDK and a decent text editor and get cracking.


Now, to be fair, martin's question seems more like a NetBeans
beginner's question than a Java beginner's question. I've found
NetBeans to be a rather clunky and unintuitive IDE, even for
experienced Java programmers.
Jul 17 '05 #7

P: n/a
Karl von Laudermann wrote:
"Tony Morris" <di******@optusnet.com.au> wrote in message news:<3f***********************@news.optusnet.com. au>...
I strongly suggest that you learn Java, and not NetBeans.
Integrated Development Environments are intended for use by competent
developers only, since they hide many of the details of what is actually
happening, and it is assumed that the user can determine what that is.
Clearly, in this case, you can't.
Grab the Sun SDK and a decent text editor and get cracking.


I've got a similar question. I was introduced to Java through the
Borland IDE but only really understood what was going on when I
downloaded the SDK and used notepad, javac and java from the command
line. I've tried eclipse but what I'd really like is something that is
in between a simple text editor and an IDE. Automatically closing
brackets and a side panel listing the methods and data fields is fine,
and perhaps also pop-up access to APIs. But what I don't want is
something that decides a directory structure for me, introduces its own
files or manages my projects. So all I want is something that will help
me write the code, and I'll do the rest, i.e. file management and
compiling. Any recommendations?

Jul 17 '05 #8

P: n/a
Paul wrote:
Karl von Laudermann wrote:
"Tony Morris" <di******@optusnet.com.au> wrote in message
news:<3f***********************@news.optusnet.com. au>...
I strongly suggest that you learn Java, and not NetBeans.
Integrated Development Environments are intended for use by competent
developers only, since they hide many of the details of what is actually
happening, and it is assumed that the user can determine what that is.
Clearly, in this case, you can't.
Grab the Sun SDK and a decent text editor and get cracking.



I've got a similar question. I was introduced to Java through the
Borland IDE but only really understood what was going on when I
downloaded the SDK and used notepad, javac and java from the command
line. I've tried eclipse but what I'd really like is something that is
in between a simple text editor and an IDE. Automatically closing
brackets and a side panel listing the methods and data fields is fine,
and perhaps also pop-up access to APIs. But what I don't want is
something that decides a directory structure for me, introduces its own
files or manages my projects. So all I want is something that will help
me write the code, and I'll do the rest, i.e. file management and
compiling. Any recommendations?

http://www.jedit.org

Ray

Jul 17 '05 #9

P: n/a
Raymond DeCampo wrote:

<snip>

http://www.jedit.org


Thanks for that Raymond. I think it's exactly what I was looking for.

Paul

Jul 17 '05 #10

P: n/a

I've got a similar question. I was introduced to Java through the
Borland IDE but only really understood what was going on when I
downloaded the SDK and used notepad, javac and java from the command
line. I've tried eclipse but what I'd really like is something that is
in between a simple text editor and an IDE. Automatically closing
brackets and a side panel listing the methods and data fields is fine,


I'm currently using GVIM or VIM, its a VI editor (best to just get it over
and learn VI), it has support for CTAGS, which is a library of language
syntax parsers, it allows for syntax colorization.. You can use it with
Java to recognize parts of syntax. IDE tend not to be helpful, only for
graphical editing of the GUI elements, command completion and inheritance
searches.. Java is incredibly hard to program in if you haven't the ability
to browse the class structure, but then again you have to understand the
class structure and the function of everything to really use it..

I'm still learning myself but spent a year fuddling around in the source
distribution of www.openemed.org . Its not much fun when people use
CORBA.any's, Java interface classes and adhoc programming styles (see anti-
pattern "the Blob" at www.antipatterns.com). Java can be just as dirty to
code in as C.. Its a matter of how good a coder you are.. Fortunately
Java is heavy on Exception handling and Abstraction. If it wasn't it would
be awful. I'm waiting for Sun to open source Java, if they ever do, because
I feel like they use Java to leverage their business goals, and that means
deprecations don't happen for obvious reasons.. If Java was trully object
oriented, nobody would have to refactor their code.. Its just the politics
of business, bad decisions and poor design that ruin interoperability.
Well its my little gripe, its harder to deprecate stuff in open source,
because deprecation doesn't make any natural sense considering that Java is
compiled in pieces, the entire class hiearchy doesn't have to travel with
the application for it to be useful (??). Otherwise it would be smalltalk!!

Anyhow..
Jul 17 '05 #11

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