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CSS Acrobat @Media

P: n/a
Site under discussion

http://www.sturgood.com/dna/index.html

illustration of problem

http://www.sturgood.com/dna/scrnshot..._problems.html

I have posted and searched in adobe.acrobat.windows. no response and
seemingly no interest.

Acrobat does not do css well, it is following the literal html flow,
and basing display off the padding.

Padding was used to give room for image and link box.

I wanted the user to be able to download the whole site as a pdf on
their computer and print, because,

duh

the print command in IE6 prints it the same way.

So, either way, I cannot get these pages to print as displayed.

Is the @media print rule somehow my salvation, or am I missing
something really simple?

Acrobat does this page of the site really well

http://www.sturgood.com/dna/trace_demo.html
will print the table landscape nicely.

I am assuming a good @media print rule will do the same thing for
printing the page from the browser (?)

Reason for this dilemma is that we will be posting a lot of tabular
data from dna results, and people will want to print it out. I am
hoping to not have to provide print of each table separately.

thanks for any tips or pointers

johnSteve
Jul 20 '05 #1
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10 Replies


P: n/a
st****@bresnan.net wrote:
Site under discussion

http://www.sturgood.com/dna/index.html
content type text/html
illustration of problem
http://www.sturgood.com/dna/scrnshot..._problems.html

I have posted and searched in adobe.acrobat.windows. no response and
seemingly no interest.
? I'm not sure what Acrobat reader has to do with www stylesheets.
Acrobat does not do css well,>
Does it do css at all?
I wanted the user to be able to download the whole site as a pdf on
their computer and print, because,

duh

the print command in IE6 prints it the same way.
You've completely lost me. Are your documents normally in pdf?
Is the @media print rule somehow my salvation, or am I missing
something really simple?
Or <link media="print" href="style.css" type="text/css">
we will be posting a lot of tabular data from dna results, and people
will want to print it out. I am hoping to not have to provide print
of each table separately.


Print stylesheets can help you avoid having a separate "printable"
document, as long as you author your pages correctly.

--
Brian (remove "invalid" from my address to email me)
http://www.tsmchughs.com/
Jul 20 '05 #2

P: n/a
st****@bresnan.net wrote:
Site under discussion

http://www.sturgood.com/dna/index.html
content type text/html
illustration of problem
http://www.sturgood.com/dna/scrnshot..._problems.html

I have posted and searched in adobe.acrobat.windows. no response and
seemingly no interest.
? I'm not sure what Acrobat reader has to do with www stylesheets.
Acrobat does not do css well,>
Does it do css at all?
I wanted the user to be able to download the whole site as a pdf on
their computer and print, because,

duh

the print command in IE6 prints it the same way.
You've completely lost me. Are your documents normally in pdf?
Is the @media print rule somehow my salvation, or am I missing
something really simple?
Or <link media="print" href="style.css" type="text/css">
we will be posting a lot of tabular data from dna results, and people
will want to print it out. I am hoping to not have to provide print
of each table separately.


Print stylesheets can help you avoid having a separate "printable"
document, as long as you author your pages correctly.

--
Brian (remove "invalid" from my address to email me)
http://www.tsmchughs.com/
Jul 20 '05 #3

P: n/a
See:

http://www.macromedia.com/devnet/mx/..._to_print.html

Read the paragraph beginning under the heading "Media Attributes:
Screen, Print, and All"

It appears Macromedia composes an entirely separate style sheet suited
for (and targeting) only PDF file creations:

http://www.communitymx.com/cssfiles/pdfprint.css

You may think it's a pain to write up yet another CSS file for "print
only" (or whatever), but it is the most effective way to control the
appearance of your web page as it will appear on paper. One thing I
can do with a <link rel="stylesheet" href="print.css" type="text/css"
media="print"> line is eliminate from print versions the extraneous
and superfluous:

http://www.consultmillennia.com/clientservices.html

For example, printing the above page will render it on paper without
navigation links. Who needs them on a printed page? Even if you did
print them, they wouldn't go anywhere. The CSS "print" file also
displays a unique logo graphic designed specifically for the width of
a printed page, not 800x600 resolution. (Before I made this
modification, one-fourth of the original "screen" graphic disappeared
off the right side of the page.)

If, however, you want your printed page to look exactly as it appears
on the web, you're going to have to do many modifications within the
the print-only CSS so that your attributes conform to the dimensions
of the printed page.

Jul 20 '05 #4

P: n/a
See:

http://www.macromedia.com/devnet/mx/..._to_print.html

Read the paragraph beginning under the heading "Media Attributes:
Screen, Print, and All"

It appears Macromedia composes an entirely separate style sheet suited
for (and targeting) only PDF file creations:

http://www.communitymx.com/cssfiles/pdfprint.css

You may think it's a pain to write up yet another CSS file for "print
only" (or whatever), but it is the most effective way to control the
appearance of your web page as it will appear on paper. One thing I
can do with a <link rel="stylesheet" href="print.css" type="text/css"
media="print"> line is eliminate from print versions the extraneous
and superfluous:

http://www.consultmillennia.com/clientservices.html

For example, printing the above page will render it on paper without
navigation links. Who needs them on a printed page? Even if you did
print them, they wouldn't go anywhere. The CSS "print" file also
displays a unique logo graphic designed specifically for the width of
a printed page, not 800x600 resolution. (Before I made this
modification, one-fourth of the original "screen" graphic disappeared
off the right side of the page.)

If, however, you want your printed page to look exactly as it appears
on the web, you're going to have to do many modifications within the
the print-only CSS so that your attributes conform to the dimensions
of the printed page.

Jul 20 '05 #5

P: n/a
On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 06:45:26 GMT, Steve Sundberg wrote:
printing the above page will render it on paper without
navigation links. Who needs them on a printed page?


Yes indeed! Those wonderful printed
pages with the non-relevant links
trimmed, and the page devoted to
content, content, content. :-)

'Reclaim the Screen/Page Acreage!'

[ That, in itself, was the final
inducement I needed to get me off my
behind and start using them. ]

--
Andrew Thompson
http://www.PhySci.org/ Open-source software suite
http://www.PhySci.org/codes/ Web & IT Help
http://www.1point1C.org/ Science & Technology
Jul 20 '05 #6

P: n/a
On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 06:45:26 GMT, Steve Sundberg wrote:
printing the above page will render it on paper without
navigation links. Who needs them on a printed page?


Yes indeed! Those wonderful printed
pages with the non-relevant links
trimmed, and the page devoted to
content, content, content. :-)

'Reclaim the Screen/Page Acreage!'

[ That, in itself, was the final
inducement I needed to get me off my
behind and start using them. ]

--
Andrew Thompson
http://www.PhySci.org/ Open-source software suite
http://www.PhySci.org/codes/ Web & IT Help
http://www.1point1C.org/ Science & Technology
Jul 20 '05 #7

P: n/a
On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 06:45:26 GMT, de****@mm.com (Steve Sundberg)
wrote:
See:

http://www.macromedia.com/devnet/mx/..._to_print.html

Read the paragraph beginning under the heading "Media Attributes:
Screen, Print, and All" Thanks that was an interesting link.You may think it's a pain to write up yet another CSS file for "print
only" (or whatever), but it is the most effective way to control the
appearance of your web page as it will appear on paper. One thing I
can do with a <link rel="stylesheet" href="print.css" type="text/css"
media="print"> line is eliminate from print versions the extraneous
and superfluous:

I did think it was a pain, until I did it. Once I realized that the
padding was the starting point for the text in Acrobat, as well as
printing through the browser, I thought I could link to a print style
sheet that reduced the padding and changed the display for the image
and link box to "none"

it is very effective.

http://www.sturgood.com/dna/scrnshot..._problems.html

johnSteve

Jul 20 '05 #8

P: n/a
On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 06:45:26 GMT, de****@mm.com (Steve Sundberg)
wrote:
See:

http://www.macromedia.com/devnet/mx/..._to_print.html

Read the paragraph beginning under the heading "Media Attributes:
Screen, Print, and All" Thanks that was an interesting link.You may think it's a pain to write up yet another CSS file for "print
only" (or whatever), but it is the most effective way to control the
appearance of your web page as it will appear on paper. One thing I
can do with a <link rel="stylesheet" href="print.css" type="text/css"
media="print"> line is eliminate from print versions the extraneous
and superfluous:

I did think it was a pain, until I did it. Once I realized that the
padding was the starting point for the text in Acrobat, as well as
printing through the browser, I thought I could link to a print style
sheet that reduced the padding and changed the display for the image
and link box to "none"

it is very effective.

http://www.sturgood.com/dna/scrnshot..._problems.html

johnSteve

Jul 20 '05 #9

P: n/a
On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 02:23:35 -0600, johnSteve <st****@bresnan.net>
wrote:
On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 06:45:26 GMT, de****@mm.com (Steve Sundberg)
wrote:
See:

http://www.macromedia.com/devnet/mx/..._to_print.html

Read the paragraph beginning under the heading "Media Attributes:
Screen, Print, and All"

Thanks that was an interesting link.
You may think it's a pain to write up yet another CSS file for "print
only" (or whatever), but it is the most effective way to control the
appearance of your web page as it will appear on paper. One thing I
can do with a <link rel="stylesheet" href="print.css" type="text/css"
media="print"> line is eliminate from print versions the extraneous
and superfluous:

I did think it was a pain, until I did it. Once I realized that the
padding was the starting point for the text in Acrobat, as well as
printing through the browser, I thought I could link to a print style
sheet that reduced the padding and changed the display for the image
and link box to "none"

it is very effective.

http://www.sturgood.com/dna/scrnshot..._problems.html


Glad to be of help, johnSteve.
Jul 20 '05 #10

P: n/a
On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 02:23:35 -0600, johnSteve <st****@bresnan.net>
wrote:
On Sun, 25 Apr 2004 06:45:26 GMT, de****@mm.com (Steve Sundberg)
wrote:
See:

http://www.macromedia.com/devnet/mx/..._to_print.html

Read the paragraph beginning under the heading "Media Attributes:
Screen, Print, and All"

Thanks that was an interesting link.
You may think it's a pain to write up yet another CSS file for "print
only" (or whatever), but it is the most effective way to control the
appearance of your web page as it will appear on paper. One thing I
can do with a <link rel="stylesheet" href="print.css" type="text/css"
media="print"> line is eliminate from print versions the extraneous
and superfluous:

I did think it was a pain, until I did it. Once I realized that the
padding was the starting point for the text in Acrobat, as well as
printing through the browser, I thought I could link to a print style
sheet that reduced the padding and changed the display for the image
and link box to "none"

it is very effective.

http://www.sturgood.com/dna/scrnshot..._problems.html


Glad to be of help, johnSteve.
Jul 20 '05 #11

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