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Browser switch/upgrade campaign

P: n/a
I have just added a message to my website, wellheard.com, notifying WinIE
users that their browsers will not render the site correctly as the site
uses PNGs with alpha transparency. I then give them a link explaining why
they should not use IE and the benefits of upgrading to another browser. My
question is has anyone ever done this and what was their experience. I
would like feedback and comments. Why isn't their a browser switch campaign
like their was a browser upgrade campaign by webstandards.org.

Jul 20 '05 #1
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16 Replies


P: n/a
Braxton Beyer <bb****@wellheard.com> wrote:
I have just added a message to my website, wellheard.com, notifying WinIE
users that their browsers will not render the site correctly as the site
uses PNGs with alpha transparency. I then give them a link explaining why
they should not use IE and the benefits of upgrading to another browser. My
question is has anyone ever done this and what was their experience. I
would like feedback and comments.


What makes you think users give a flying monkey about alpha transparency
in a png? I suggest you address the real problem: your ego, bury it.

--
Spartanicus
Jul 20 '05 #2

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Braxton Beyer <bb****@wellheard.com> wrote in message news:<BC35F835.C75%bb****@wellheard.com>...
I have just added a message to my website, wellheard.com, notifying WinIE
users that their browsers will not render the site correctly as the site
uses PNGs with alpha transparency. I then give them a link explaining why
they should not use IE and the benefits of upgrading to another browser. My
question is has anyone ever done this and what was their experience. I
would like feedback and comments. Why isn't their a browser switch campaign
like their was a browser upgrade campaign by webstandards.org.


If you're making a page geared towards a high-tech audience (i.e. web
developers), then I would say go with the latest CSS
bells-and-whistles if you want.

But your site is the homepage for a web development company. Most of
your visitors aren't going to give a flying monkey about web
standards. All they are going to see is that your page doesn't look
right* in the most popular browser. I say try to make the page pretty
for as many people as possible.

*Even with the no-transparency, your site looks decent. You could cut
out parts of the background image, gray them, and then use them in
your content sections to get the same effect.
Jul 20 '05 #3

P: n/a
Braxton Beyer wrote:
I have just added a message to my website, wellheard.com, notifying WinIE
users that their browsers will not render the site correctly as the site
uses PNGs with alpha transparency. I then give them a link explaining why
they should not use IE and the benefits of upgrading to another browser.


- "it will conform to current web standards": The phrase "web standards"
should be linked to <http://www.w3c.org/>, the organization that
publishes the standards.

- Your site is very hard to use in e.g. Mozilla or Opera because the
distracting background-image shines through. It's actually a lot easier
to use in IE6.

- None of the sites in your portfolio validate.

- PNG transparency has nothing to do with stylesheets.

Matthias

Jul 20 '05 #4

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Trent wrote:
Braxton Beyer <bb****@wellheard.com> wrote
I have just added a message to my website, wellheard.com


But your site is the homepage for a web development company. Most
of your visitors aren't going to give a flying monkey about web
standards.


2 replies, 2 references to flying monkeys. :-D
Have we entered the forest of the wicked witch?

--
Brian (follow directions in my address to email me)
http://www.tsmchughs.com/

Jul 20 '05 #5

P: n/a
Braxton Beyer wrote:
wellheard.com


Your background image is 250KB in size; for a modem user, that's
probably going to take about 40-50 seconds to download! Is there any way
you could reduce the file size? Also, I have a reasonably specced
machine (2.5GHz, 512M RAM) and scrolling in either Firebird or IE went
at a crawl.

- Iain.
Jul 20 '05 #6

P: n/a
On Fri, 23 Jan 2004, Brian wrote:
2 replies, 2 references to flying monkeys. :-D
Have we entered the forest of the wicked witch?


Chinese New Year?

Jul 20 '05 #7

P: n/a
DU
Braxton Beyer wrote:
I have just added a message to my website, wellheard.com, notifying WinIE
users that their browsers will not render the site correctly as the site
uses PNGs with alpha transparency. I then give them a link explaining why
they should not use IE and the benefits of upgrading to another browser. My
question is has anyone ever done this and what was their experience. I
would like feedback and comments. Why isn't their a browser switch campaign
like their was a browser upgrade campaign by webstandards.org.


Maybe invite your audience to sign the "Proper PNG Support in Internet
Explorer for Windows" petition instead. And inform them about how useful
and better for the web PNG format is. Just a thought.

http://www.petitiononline.com/msiepng/petition.html

http://www.webcolors.freeserve.co.uk/png/

DU
Jul 20 '05 #8

P: n/a
DU
Spartanicus wrote:
Braxton Beyer <bb****@wellheard.com> wrote:

I have just added a message to my website, wellheard.com, notifying WinIE
users that their browsers will not render the site correctly as the site
uses PNGs with alpha transparency. I then give them a link explaining why
they should not use IE and the benefits of upgrading to another browser. My
question is has anyone ever done this and what was their experience. I
would like feedback and comments.

What makes you think users give a flying monkey about alpha transparency
in a png? I suggest you address the real problem: your ego, bury it.


Then a lot of people are having ego problems on the web.

"What do you want from the Internet Explorer team?" (link will broken to
avoid scrolling)
http://scoblecomments.scripting.com/comments?u=1011
&p=6183&link=http%3A%2F%2Fradio.weblogs.com%2F0001 011%2F2004%2F01%2F14.html%23a6183

13,000 people have signed the "Proper PNG Support in Internet Explorer
for Windows" online petition.

There would have been no progress at all in any/all browsers if no one
had ever reported a bug or ever made a request.

DU
Jul 20 '05 #9

P: n/a
Braxton Beyer wrote:
I have just added a message to my website, wellheard.com, notifying WinIE
users that their browsers will not render the site correctly as the site
uses PNGs with alpha transparency. I then give them a link explaining why
they should not use IE and the benefits of upgrading to another browser. My
question is has anyone ever done this and what was their experience. I
would like feedback and comments. Why isn't their a browser switch campaign
like their was a browser upgrade campaign by webstandards.org.


As long as it's just a note added dynamically to pages, then it
shouldn't be a problem (you've educated users and if they wish to
continue using junk then it's their loss). However, if you're denying
access, then I think it's a bad idea.

BTW, the webstandards.org campaign was discontinued because they say all
browsers in common use support web standards well. I guess they don't
consider IE 6 a common browser.

Jul 20 '05 #10

P: n/a
Alan J. Flavell wrote:
On Fri, 23 Jan 2004, Brian wrote:
2 replies, 2 references to flying monkeys. :-D
Have we entered the forest of the wicked witch?


Chinese New Year?


Ah, right, I hadn't thought of that.

--
Brian (follow directions in my address to email me)
http://www.tsmchughs.com/

Jul 20 '05 #11

P: n/a
DU <dr*******@hotWIPETHISmail.com> wrote:
What makes you think users give a flying monkey about alpha transparency
in a png? I suggest you address the real problem: your ego, bury it.


Then a lot of people are having ego problems on the web.

13,000 people have signed the "Proper PNG Support in Internet Explorer
for Windows" online petition.

There would have been no progress at all in any/all browsers if no one
had ever reported a bug or ever made a request.


Nothing wrong with wanting browsers to get better, but insisting to tell
unsuspecting users that you don't like browser x because it doesn't
display your work 100% as intended is an ego problem.

Users don't care.

--
Spartanicus
Jul 20 '05 #12

P: n/a
In article <BC*****************@wellheard.com>, bb****@wellheard.com
enlightened us with...
I have just added a message to my website, wellheard.com, notifying WinIE
users that their browsers will not render the site correctly as the site
uses PNGs with alpha transparency. I then give them a link explaining why
they should not use IE and the benefits of upgrading to another browser. My
question is has anyone ever done this and what was their experience. I
would like feedback and comments. Why isn't their a browser switch campaign
like their was a browser upgrade campaign by webstandards.org.


Your site doesn't work in one of the most common browsers out there?

It's one thing to tell people that other browsers are better*. It's
another to make a site that doesn't work or doesn't display properly in
the most popular browser in use. It certainly isn't required of you to
use those types of images. It may be required that a user use IE6
(school, library, work, etc).

*Netscape7 and Opera7 rock way more than IE6, no arguments there

--
--
~kaeli~
To steal ideas from one person is plagiarism; to steal from
many is research.
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/wildAtHeart
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/kaelisSpace

Jul 20 '05 #13

P: n/a
On 1/23/04 13:00, in article bu**********@news.eusc.inter.net, "DU"
<dr*******@hotWIPETHISmail.com> wrote:
Braxton Beyer wrote:
I have just added a message to my website, wellheard.com, notifying WinIE
users that their browsers will not render the site correctly as the site
uses PNGs with alpha transparency. I then give them a link explaining why
they should not use IE and the benefits of upgrading to another browser. My
question is has anyone ever done this and what was their experience. I
would like feedback and comments. Why isn't their a browser switch campaign
like their was a browser upgrade campaign by webstandards.org.


Maybe invite your audience to sign the "Proper PNG Support in Internet
Explorer for Windows" petition instead. And inform them about how useful
and better for the web PNG format is. Just a thought.

http://www.petitiononline.com/msiepng/petition.html

http://www.webcolors.freeserve.co.uk/png/

DU

If the user follows the links, it will take them to the tips page where I
mention the petition. It also explains the benefits of switching browsers
for an ordinary user(non-technical). Maybe, I should put that part on the
warning page.

Jul 20 '05 #14

P: n/a
On 1/23/04 14:36, in article MP************************@nntp.lucent.com,
"kaeli" <ti******@NOSPAM.comcast.net> wrote:
In article <BC*****************@wellheard.com>, bb****@wellheard.com
enlightened us with...
I have just added a message to my website, wellheard.com, notifying WinIE
users that their browsers will not render the site correctly as the site
uses PNGs with alpha transparency. I then give them a link explaining why
they should not use IE and the benefits of upgrading to another browser. My
question is has anyone ever done this and what was their experience. I
would like feedback and comments. Why isn't their a browser switch campaign
like their was a browser upgrade campaign by webstandards.org.


Your site doesn't work in one of the most common browsers out there?

It's one thing to tell people that other browsers are better*. It's
another to make a site that doesn't work or doesn't display properly in
the most popular browser in use. It certainly isn't required of you to
use those types of images. It may be required that a user use IE6
(school, library, work, etc).

*Netscape7 and Opera7 rock way more than IE6, no arguments there

I understand your point, and I would never do that on a client's site, but
IE users can still access all the content, it just looks a bit different. I
know it may be risky but otherwise these users may never even know they have
a choice. That is the ones who do have a choice.

Jul 20 '05 #15

P: n/a
On Fri, 23 Jan 2004 22:46:43 GMT, Braxton Beyer <bb****@wellheard.com>
wrote:
I understand your point, and I would never do that on a client's site,


You wouldn't do it on a client's site, but you'd do it on your own site,
the one the clients go to to see what you're all about? Clients who are
probably all IE users?

What are you saying to those clients? If they assume you'd do that on
their site, you'd never get the call.

I'm not saying you don't have a point. I'm saying I think it's a really
stupid business decision to do that.
Jul 20 '05 #16

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*Braxton Beyer*:

I have just added a message to my website, wellheard.com, notifying WinIE
users that their browsers will not render the site correctly
It's one thin to have such a message at all, but a different to have it on
an obtrusive red background.
as the site uses PNGs with alpha transparency.
You want to be paid for making websites, right? Don't show the potential
customer that you resign, because of faulty browsers, but do the best to get
around this instead.
For such simple PNGs with constant opacity, i.e. not a full featured alpha
channel, you could for example provide an alternate dithered GIF with every
second or so pixel transparent, if you're not satisfied with the current
appearance.

Oh, and the background image is /way/ too large in file size. 50kB (a fifth
of the current size) is an absolute maximum. It's probably a good idea to
not use PNG but JPEG for this photographic one.
My question is has anyone ever done this


Yes, there are a lot of evangelist wannabes out there.

--
"I have opinions of my own -- strong opinions --
but I don't always agree with them." - George Bush
Jul 20 '05 #17

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