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Slitting our own throats?

It occured to me, as I placed yet another child selector ie hack into my
css that we may be slitting our own throats with these kind of hacks.

What happens if Microsoft decides that in the next IE service pack they're
going to add child selector support, but not much of anything else?
Suddenly there will be thousands upon thousands of sites messed up because
IE can suddenly see the CSS we thought was hidden. The same goes for the
various other hacks used for different browsers, though I think we have
little to fear from old Navigators suddenly understanding @import.

On top of this, doesn't it man that if Microsoft were halfway responsible,
they simply could not implement these selector hacks until they have
everything else working correctly as well? Is using these hacks actually
tying Microsoft's hands in terms of supporting features?

Just something to think about...
Jul 20 '05 #1
3 1353
Erik Funkenbusch wrote:
It occured to me, as I placed yet another child selector ie hack into
my css that we may be slitting our own throats with these kind of
hacks.


Every workaround has side-effects, and some will only show later. The
only nice thing when it's done in CSS is that it's not spreading out
all over the pages but within a single file.
Jul 20 '05 #2
Erik Funkenbusch wrote:
It occured to me, as I placed yet another child selector ie hack into my
css that we may be slitting our own throats with these kind of hacks.

What happens if Microsoft decides that in the next IE service pack they're
going to add child selector support, but not much of anything else?
Suddenly there will be thousands upon thousands of sites messed up because
IE can suddenly see the CSS we thought was hidden. The same goes for the
various other hacks used for different browsers, though I think we have
little to fear from old Navigators suddenly understanding @import.


Hacks are never a good solution, even though they're very popular these
days. There are a couple suggestions that might help minimize future
compatibility and maintenance problems:
<http://css-discuss.incutio.com/?page=GoodCSSHack>
Matthias

Jul 20 '05 #3
Erik Funkenbusch <er**@despam-funkenbusch.com> writes:

On top of this, doesn't it man that if Microsoft were halfway responsible,
they simply could not implement these selector hacks until they have
everything else working correctly as well? Is using these hacks actually
tying Microsoft's hands in terms of supporting features?


monkeySoft half way responsible?

not in my lifetime.
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305 321-1144 (mobile http://www.JerrySievers.com/
Jul 20 '05 #4

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