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Is there such a thing as printing to "%" scale?

P: n/a
Hi, I have a version of my resume that is (almost) web ready and I'm pleased with its
appearance on the screen (well, sort of heh heh, it's my first HTML). I also created
a tighter, scaled-down version from my original (Pagemaker 6.0) as an Adobe PDF, so
employers can have something that is graphically identical to the original PM6
document.

But I was just curious: For someone who (for whatever reason) wanted to quickly
print out the ENLARGED (HTML, screen)version that appears on their browser screen, is
there a way I can accommodate them by instructing the entire page to "Shrink all data
(fonts, images etc.) by xx%" when printing so it doesn't look quite so gaudy?

Thank you everyone :)

Angel
Jul 20 '05 #1
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11 Replies


P: n/a
Curious Angel <by*******@usa.net> wrote in
news:MP************************@news.intergate.com :
Hi, I have a version of my resume that is (almost) web ready and I'm
pleased with its appearance on the screen (well, sort of heh heh, it's
my first HTML). I also created a tighter, scaled-down version from my
original (Pagemaker 6.0) as an Adobe PDF, so employers can have
something that is graphically identical to the original PM6 document.
You might possibly want to post a link to this HTML file of your résumé
in another thread, so that people here can have fun ripping your HTML to
pieces. :) Then again, I presume too much.
But I was just curious: For someone who (for whatever reason) wanted
to quickly print out the ENLARGED (HTML, screen)version that appears
on their browser screen, is there a way I can accommodate them by
instructing the entire page to "Shrink all data (fonts, images etc.)
by xx%" when printing so it doesn't look quite so gaudy?


Remember that, as a rule, every browser is going to render your document
differently. Especially when printing. The trick is to use print-only
CSS:

@media print {
/* style sheet for print goes here */
}

Specifically, you might want:
@media print {
body { font-size: .8em; }
}

for the font size to be multiplied by 0.8. If all stylistic aspects of
your document are given sizes relative to font size, then everything
would presumably shrink. I suspect that might not be the case, if you
used PageMaker. Providing a URL might help the people here
help/criticize/point you further in the right direction.

--
Accessible web designs go easily unnoticed;
the others are remembered and avoided forever.
Jul 20 '05 #2

P: n/a
In article <Xn**************************@130.133.1.4>, hu****@rpi.edu says...
You might possibly want to post a link to this HTML file of your résumé
in another thread, so that people here can have fun ripping your HTML to
pieces. :) Then again, I presume too much.
Well "pieces" is the operative word heh heh. Don't ask me how I got it to this
point, it's . . . it's all a blur LOL.
Remember that, as a rule, every browser is going to render your document
differently. Especially when printing. The trick is to use print-only
CSS:

@media print {
/* style sheet for print goes here */
}

Specifically, you might want:
@media print {
body { font-size: .8em; }
}

for the font size to be multiplied by 0.8. If all stylistic aspects of
your document are given sizes relative to font size, then everything
would presumably shrink. I suspect that might not be the case, if you
used PageMaker. Providing a URL might help the people here
help/criticize/point you further in the right direction.
Actually the only way I was able to get this far was by exporting the PM6 to Rich
Text Format (~.rtf) . . . and then importing that into AceFile . . . and then
cleaning it up in Netscape. Other than the maddening inability for me to format the
letting (vertical spacing) on each respective line (and a few other issues related to
underscoring) it isn't too bad. It's a rough approximation of its Pagemaker
original. The PDF looks great wth LOL.

"Print only CSS" ? That is a "Cascading Style Sheet" correct? I don't suppose I
could slip those 3 lines @media print {
body { font-size: .8em; }
}

somewhere in the document and have Insta-Shrink (?) on print?

Angel
Jul 20 '05 #3

P: n/a
On Mon, 2 Aug 2004, Sam Hughes wrote:
Remember that, as a rule, every browser is going to render your document
differently. Especially when printing.
Damn right it is...
The trick is to use print-only CSS:
Is it? IMHO the "trick" is to keep in mind that CSS may or may not be
honoured by the client, and to design for flexibility. Printing is
only one aspect of that - the principle is a much wider one.

If you're so desperate to get a particular visual result on printing,
then I'd have to recommend offering a PDF alternative. But I'll
probably still print the HTML version, at -my- settings, even so. If
the CSS tries too hard to oppose my settings, then I'll turn it off.
That's part of the design concept of CSS, which I fully support:
clients can take it where it makes sense - disable if where it
doesn't.
Specifically, you might want:
@media print {
body { font-size: .8em; }
}


Why on Earth might you want that? Or rather, why would you want -me-
to want that? 1.0em is my preferred body font size, by definition.
Jul 20 '05 #4

P: n/a
Curious Angel <by*******@usa.net> wrote:
Actually the only way I was able to get this far was by exporting the PM6 to Rich
Text Format (~.rtf) . . . and then importing that into AceFile . . . and then
cleaning it up in Netscape. Other than the maddening inability for me to format the
letting (vertical spacing)


"Leading", FYI. Pronounced like "ledding".
--
Harlan Messinger
Remove the first dot from my e-mail address.
Veuillez ôter le premier point de mon adresse de courriel.
Jul 20 '05 #5

P: n/a
Curious Angel <by*******@usa.net> wrote in
news:MP************************@news.intergate.com :
In article <Xn**************************@130.133.1.4>, hu****@rpi.edu
says...

[...]
Actually the only way I was able to get this far was by exporting the
PM6 to Rich Text Format (~.rtf) . . . and then importing that into
AceFile . . . and then cleaning it up in Netscape. Other than the
maddening inability for me to format the letting (vertical spacing) on
each respective line (and a few other issues related to underscoring)
it isn't too bad. It's a rough approximation of its Pagemaker
original. The PDF looks great wth LOL.


Sounds like quite an adventure!

"Print only CSS" ? That is a "Cascading Style Sheet" correct? I
don't suppose I could slip those 3 lines
@media print {
body { font-size: .8em; }
}

somewhere in the document and have Insta-Shrink (?) on print?


It would need to be in a CSS file or a STYLE element, of course. I'm not
sure you think the text should shrink though.

--
Accessible web designs go easily unnoticed;
the others are remembered and avoided forever.
Jul 20 '05 #6

P: n/a
/-----------------------------------\
| Curious Angel <by*******@usa.net> |
\-----------------------------------/
_
/|\
/ | \
| "Alan J. Flavell" <fl*****@ph.gla.ac.uk> wrote in
| news:Pi*****************************@ppepc56.ph.gl a.ac.uk:
|
| On Mon, 2 Aug 2004, Sam Hughes wrote:
|
| Specifically, you might want:
| @media print {
| body { font-size: .8em; }
| }

|
| Why on Earth might you want that? Or rather, why would you want
| -me- to want that? 1.0em is my preferred body font size, by
| definition.

|
Huh?| I don't want that at all. He does ---\
| for some reason. \
| /
| /
\---------------------------------------/

--
Accessible web designs go easily unnoticed;
the others are remembered and avoided forever.
Jul 20 '05 #7

P: n/a
Sam Hughes wrote:
Curious Angel wrote:
For someone who (for whatever reason) wanted to quickly print out
the ENLARGED (HTML, screen)version that appears on their browser
screen, is there a way I can accommodate them by instructing the
entire page to "Shrink all data (fonts, images etc.) by xx%" when
printing so it doesn't look quite so gaudy?
Remember that, as a rule, every browser is going to render your
document differently. Especially when printing. The trick is to use
print-only CSS:

@media print {
/* style sheet for print goes here */
}


Note that IE/Mac, while otherwise a good CSS browser, cannot parse
@media rules, so linking multiple stylesheets might be better.

<link href="foo.css" media="screen">
<link href="bar.css" media="print">

Specifically, you might want:
@media print {
body { font-size: .8em; }
}


Why would he want to set the font size for the <body> to less than 100%
of the user's default? Sure, the op asked how, but that doesn't mean
it's a good idea. ;-)

--
Brian (remove ".invalid" to email me)
http://www.tsmchughs.com/
Jul 20 '05 #8

P: n/a
Curious Angel wrote:
For someone who (for whatever reason) wanted to quickly print out the
ENLARGED (HTML, screen)version that appears on their browser screen,
What do you mean by "englarged...version"? As usual, a url would help.
is there a way I can accommodate them by instructing the entire page
to "Shrink all data (fonts, images etc.) by xx%" when printing so it
doesn't look quite so gaudy?


You could try to create your own widget, in the page, to shrink the text
size, but that would mean users would have to learn something that will
only work on your site. You could create an alternate stylesheet with a
smaller font size, and explain to users how they can select that
alternate stylesheet, but IE/Win cannot do such a thing. Besides, if
you're going to teach them how to perform some function in their
browser, why not teach them how to change the font size? Simpler, more
broadly supported.

--
Brian (remove ".invalid" to email me)
http://www.tsmchughs.com/
Jul 20 '05 #9

P: n/a
Curious Angel <by*******@usa.net> wrote in
news:MP************************@news.intergate.com :
Hi, I have a version of my resume that is (almost) web ready and I'm
pleased with its appearance on the screen (well, sort of heh heh, it's
my first HTML). I also created a tighter, scaled-down version from my
original (Pagemaker 6.0) as an Adobe PDF, so employers can have
something that is graphically identical to the original PM6 document.

But I was just curious: For someone who (for whatever reason) wanted
to quickly print out the ENLARGED (HTML, screen)version that appears
on their browser screen, is there a way I can accommodate them by
instructing the entire page to "Shrink all data (fonts, images etc.)
by xx%" when printing so it doesn't look quite so gaudy?


Note that the web is not a medium in which you can or should try to
succeed at making a document look exactly as intended. For all the
neatness and niceness and cool horizontal lines a résumé is supposed to
have, that whole idea goes down the drain when it comes to the web.
Users have control over the document, not you. Why would the HTML
document be "enlarged"? As other people have heckled me for not having
reminded you, the document is merely displayed at the size the visitor
prefers.

--
Accessible web designs go easily unnoticed;
the others are remembered and avoided forever.
Jul 20 '05 #10

P: n/a
Curious Angel wrote:
But I was just curious: For someone who (for whatever reason) wanted to quickly
print out the ENLARGED (HTML, screen)version that appears on their browser screen, is
there a way I can accommodate them by instructing the entire page to "Shrink all data
(fonts, images etc.) by xx%" when printing so it doesn't look quite so gaudy?


That's a user/browser job, not yours. Firefox can scale prints easily.

--
Mark.
Jul 20 '05 #11

P: n/a
In article <Xn*************************@130.133.1.4>, hu****@rpi.edu says...
Note that the web is not a medium in which you can or should try to
succeed at making a document look exactly as intended. For all the
neatness and niceness and cool horizontal lines a résumé is supposed to
have, that whole idea goes down the drain when it comes to the web.
Users have control over the document, not you. Why would the HTML
document be "enlarged"? As other people have heckled me for not having
reminded you, the document is merely displayed at the size the visitor
prefers.


Sam . . . I believe this is where I say "DUH" and go find a wall to bang my head
against LOL.

I don't know why the fact of User-Preferenced Font-Size (directly from the browser,
DUH) didn't dawn on me. Of COURSE this makes my entire thread irrelevant ha ha.

Thank you anyway friends. And yes, I'll get the resume up so that everyone can
roundly issue their verdicts. Believe me, after being self-employed for 20 years,
there is nothing anyone could say that would depress me more than the fact that I am
even doing a resume (sigh).

Angel
Jul 20 '05 #12

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