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Why Blank Space on Last Row of Table?

P: n/a
Look at the following web page test.
http://netmation.com/test61.htm

Why is there blank space on the 4th row, can not get rid of it.

Using the latest IE 6
Jul 20 '05 #1
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P: n/a
Al Franz wrote:
http://netmation.com/test61.htm

Why is there blank space on the 4th row, can not get rid of it.


Without testing, it loks like margin or padding on the <UL> element.
BTW, tables for layout? <font> tags? A bit out of date for html authoring.

--
Brian (remove ".invalid" to email me)
http://www.tsmchughs.com/
Jul 20 '05 #2

P: n/a
On Thu, 29 Jul 2004 02:00:58 GMT, Al Franz <al****@nospam.netmation.com>
wrote:
Look at the following web page test.
http://netmation.com/test61.htm

Why is there blank space on the 4th row, can not get rid of it.

Using the latest IE 6


The unordered lists have equally positive bottom margins, that's all. Fix
it with some CSS.

By the way, on your main page, the meta tag with attribute
name="distribution" needs to be fixed.

Looking at the manner in which you write HTML, I think you should learn
CSS. You could also learn how to nest elements correctly. For instance,
you have a TABLE element nested inside a FONT element, which is invalid,
because FONT is inline and TABLE is block-level. However, FONT is listed
in the specification as deprecated, anyway, because to change fonts with
CSS is simpler, and easier to upgrade, since content and presentation is
separate when CSS gets used.

For an example, here is what you would get if you converted all the
presentational attributes into CSS:

<HTML>
<HEAD>
<TITLE>Test Table</TITLE>
<style type="text/css">
body {
background: #FFF;
color: #000;
font-family: arial, "ms sans serif", univers, sans-serif;
font-size: 90%;
}
a:link {
background: transparent;
color: #00F;
}
a:visited {
background: transparent;
color: #F00;
}
a:active {
background: transparent;
color: #F00;
}

ul {
margin-bottom: 0;
list-style-type: square;
}

table{
border: 1px outset lightgray;
}
td {
width: 181px;
text-align: left;
vertical-align: top;
border: 1px inset lightgray;
}
</style>

</HEAD>
<body>
<table>
<tr>
<td>
<UL>
<LI>Sign Post
<LI>For Sale Signs
<LI>Flyers
</UL></td>
<td>
<UL>
<LI>Lock Box
<LI>Photographs
<LI>Web Page
</UL></td>
<td>
<UL>
<LI>Title Discount
<LI>Escrow Discount
<LI>24/7 Service
</UL></td>
</tr>
</table>
</BODY>
</HTML>

The source is much simpler to look at, and you could put the CSS into a
separate file, if you so desired. Thus, if applied to your web site, the
external document could be pointed to from every page. Since all of your
pages are very similar, this would make life much easier, and stylistic
changes could be applied to one document, instead of all.
--
Accessible web designs go easily unnoticed;
the others are remembered and avoided forever.
Jul 20 '05 #3

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