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microsoft equation editor

P: n/a
Hey

Basically, I'm trying to take objects created in microsoft word using
equation editor (for creating clean looking math/physics equations)
and putting them into some sort of webpage format. But they come out
grossly unalligned and ugly when I try to directly copy and paste into
microsoft frontpage 2000. Few things I could do is place them directly
using x/y coord (which i don't know how to do), or just taking
screenshots and use photoshop to create images of the text (but that
would take too much memory and effort). Are there any simply ways of
dealing with this?
Jul 20 '05 #1
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9 Replies


P: n/a
M3k
Stud Muffin wrote:
Hey

Basically, I'm trying to take objects created in microsoft word using
equation editor (for creating clean looking math/physics equations)
and putting them into some sort of webpage format. But they come out
grossly unalligned and ugly when I try to directly copy and paste into
microsoft frontpage 2000. Few things I could do is place them directly
using x/y coord (which i don't know how to do), or just taking
screenshots and use photoshop to create images of the text (but that
would take too much memory and effort). Are there any simply ways of
dealing with this?


Have you tried the <pre>your info here</pre> tag? May be as simple as that.

Otherwise try using PHP "printf" defining your format.

C&P what you are trying to do here. I would like to get a better clue on
what exactly you are trying to do.
Jul 20 '05 #2

P: n/a
Stud Muffin" <co***********@yahoo.com> wrote in
comp.infosystems.www.authoring.html:
Basically, I'm trying to take objects created in microsoft word using
equation editor (for creating clean looking math/physics equations)
and putting them into some sort of webpage format. But they come out
grossly unalligned and ugly when I try to directly copy and paste into
microsoft frontpage 2000.
Then don't. Instead, paste them into an image editor. I use 16-bit
LView Pro, and it does just fine most of the time. From my bookmark
file:
http://www.ring.gr.jp/pub/pc/winsock...s/lviewp1b.zip
http://ftp.uol.com.br/netutil/lviewp1b.zip
http://www.kiarchive.ru/pub/windows/...s/lviewp1b.zip

N.B. You need to close Equation Editor and then right-click on the
equation in Word, select Copy, the Paste into your picture editor. I
don't know about Photoshop, but Lview can't read Equation Editor
format until Word has massaged it.

Even so, the spacing is occasionally a little different from what it
is on the Word screen, so I've begin doing a screen capture and then
pasting into my picture editor and cropping.
Few things I could do is place them directly
using x/y coord (which i don't know how to do), or just taking
screenshots and use photoshop to create images of the text (but that
would take too much memory and effort).


??? Don't have the Word window full screen, but reduce it in size to
just big enough for the equation. Use Alt-Printscreen, not plain
Printscreen, to capture only the current window.

I don't know what you mean by "too much effort": this is the method
I use in making up quizzes and it takes less time than creating the
equations in Equation Editor.

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Cortland County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
HTML 4.01 spec: http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/
validator: http://validator.w3.org/
CSS 2 spec: http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-CSS2/
2.1 changes: http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS21/changes.html
validator: http://jigsaw.w3.org/css-validator/
Jul 20 '05 #3

P: n/a
"Stud Muffin" <co***********@yahoo.com> a écrit dans le message de
news:ba**************************@posting.google.c om
Basically, I'm trying to take objects created in microsoft word using
equation editor (for creating clean looking math/physics equations)
and putting them into some sort of webpage format. But they come out
grossly unalligned and ugly when I try to directly copy and paste into
microsoft frontpage 2000. Few things I could do is place them directly
using x/y coord (which i don't know how to do), or just taking
screenshots and use photoshop to create images of the text (but that
would take too much memory and effort). Are there any simply ways of
dealing with this?


Hard to answer without knowing what you want to paste in a html document.
Can you post what Frontpage has generate ?

Jul 20 '05 #4

P: n/a
On 2 May 2004, Stud Muffin wrote:
Basically, I'm trying to take objects created in microsoft word using
equation editor (for creating clean looking math/physics equations)
and putting them into some sort of webpage format.


Have a look at <http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/math/> &
<http://www.unics.uni-hannover.de/nhtcapri/mathematics.html>
and forget MS Word when creating HTML documents.

--
Top-posting.
What's the most irritating thing on Usenet?

Jul 20 '05 #5

P: n/a
On Mon, 3 May 2004 11:09:12 +0200, Pierre Goiffon
<pg******@nowhere.invalid> wrote:
Can you post what Frontpage has generate ?


Can you, instead, link to a live example? Kb's of code aren't as helpful
as a live example.

Jul 20 '05 #6

P: n/a
On Mon, 3 May 2004, Neal wrote:
On Mon, 3 May 2004 11:09:12 +0200, Pierre Goiffon
<pg******@nowhere.invalid> wrote:
Can you post what Frontpage has generate ?

Have mercy on us, please!
Can you, instead, link to a live example? Kb's of code aren't as helpful
as a live example.


Yes, it would be useful to see just what kind of complexity is
involved. Many of the in-lined equation-editor objects produced by
our authors can be easily represented in Word itself, with just a few
sub- and sup- fixes, and then they convert naturally enough to HTML,
by whatever means one is using; but now and again we get examples
which are way beyond that, and the same usually goes for full-line
equations.

In the past, when I've tried to save-as HTML from Word itself (which I
definitely don't recommend, but this is just for the purposes of
discussion), it has turned equation editor objects into a .gif image
of a certain size, and then included them into the web page using
HEIGHT and WIDTH attributes which were different from the natural size
of the image. The visual result left, ahem - shall we say - a lot to
be desired. Quite why they save the image at one size (in px units)
and then referenced it with a different size (in px units) was unclear
to me. But I haven't tried that again recently, so maybe more-recent
versions of those web page extruders have changed, I don't know for
sure.

Of course, getting an image to match the size of the surrounding text
is a ticklish problem. If they had re-sized the image via CSS in em
units then there would have been some logical reason for the resizing!
(But of course, being Microsoft they had sized the web page text via
CSS in pt units anyway, grumble).

There are plenty of tutorials and discussion pages out there about
various different ways, with HTML, to produce something usable on a
web page when you want to display a mathematical formula or equation.
Saving the thing as an image is probably the last option to choose,
when all else has failed, and you're still morally (or in some cases
also legally) bound to devise some meaningful ALT text for the image.

Attempting to do something which is already complex and fraught in
HTML, i.e representing mathematics, while imposing the additional
constraint of wanting it to be produced by MS authoring software,
seems to be to be some kind of cruel and unusual punishment, if you
don't mind me saying so.
Jul 20 '05 #7

P: n/a
"Alan J. Flavell" <fl*****@ph.gla.ac.uk> wrote in
comp.infosystems.www.authoring.html:
In the past, when I've tried to save-as HTML from Word itself (which I
definitely don't recommend, but this is just for the purposes of
discussion), it has turned equation editor objects into a .gif image
of a certain size, and then included them into the web page using
HEIGHT and WIDTH attributes which were different from the natural size
of the image. The visual result left, ahem - shall we say - a lot to
be desired.


I just now tried this with Word 97 under Windows 98. It created a
76x56 image and the HTML was <IMG SRC="Image42.gif" WIDTH=76
HEIGHT=56>. That's only one data point, of course; the sizes might
be different for a different equation.

I had never tried "Save as HTML" before, but after reading your
article I hoped it might be an easier way to get EE objects into
GIFS. Interestingly, the GIF didn't look the same as the EE object
did in Word!

Specifics: The formula was the well-known computation of the
arithmetic mean, xbar = Sigma x over n. In the GIF, the bottom edge
of the Sigma merged with the fraction bar; in Word they were
separated a couple of pixels. (The GIF file seemed to match the
apparent size of the EE object in Word.)

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Cortland County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
HTML 4.01 spec: http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/
validator: http://validator.w3.org/
CSS 2 spec: http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-CSS2/
2.1 changes: http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS21/changes.html
validator: http://jigsaw.w3.org/css-validator/
Jul 20 '05 #8

P: n/a
"Alan J. Flavell" <fl*****@ph.gla.ac.uk> wrote in
comp.infosystems.www.authoring.html:
There are plenty of tutorials and discussion pages out there about
various different ways, with HTML, to produce something usable on a
web page when you want to display a mathematical formula or equation.
Saving the thing as an image is probably the last option to choose,
when all else has failed,


I trust you'd agree that all else _does_ fail when a fraction needs
to be represented, and it's too complicated to show in one line with
/ and extra parentheses?

I used to hack with tables and <hr> to make fractions, but I saw the
error of my ways.

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Cortland County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
HTML 4.01 spec: http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/
validator: http://validator.w3.org/
CSS 2 spec: http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-CSS2/
2.1 changes: http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS21/changes.html
validator: http://jigsaw.w3.org/css-validator/
Jul 20 '05 #9

P: n/a
On Tue, 4 May 2004, Stan Brown wrote:
I just now tried this with Word 97 under Windows 98. It created a
76x56 image and the HTML was <IMG SRC="Image42.gif" WIDTH=76
HEIGHT=56>. That's only one data point, of course;
I don't for a moment disbelieve you! But I'm positive that I got a
different sizing. My guess would be that the causes lie somewhere
else ( software version / OS font sizing choices / whatever ).
the sizes might be different for a different equation.
No, it seemed to be a consistent factor, for me. But it's been some
time since I tried this, so if you'll excuse me, I'll stop guessing,
and if I ever come to rest from applying a continous stream of MS
security fixes to anything that moves,[1] I'll try to find a moment to
see what happens nowadays.
I had never tried "Save as HTML" before, but after reading your
article I hoped it might be an easier way to get EE objects into
GIFS. Interestingly, the GIF didn't look the same as the EE object
did in Word!


Oh, what a surprise...

all the best.

[1] this used to be relatively easy when we officially supported
Windows; but since we were told by the grant holder that officially we
don't support Windows, only Linux, the work on defending ourselves
against user-(non)-maintained Windows systems has multiplied out of
all proportion.
Jul 20 '05 #10

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