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Teaching Onesself Webdesign

P: n/a
I'm in the process of teaching myself, or shall i say in the process
of expanding my knowledge in webdesign. I do have my own site up and I
love doing it. Right now I do it as a hobby. I would like the
opportunity to possibly make money doing it someday.

I know I will have to know alot more than what I know now. I havent
dabbed into XML I's dabbed alittle bit into DHTML. I I know I need
more experaince in scripting and webapplication programming..

What I would like to know, this question goes out to the many
designers here who maintain sites for a living...What wil I eventually
need to know in order to be successful in creating websites....
Jul 20 '05 #1
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20 Replies


P: n/a
"richk" <ri******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:e2**************************@posting.google.c om...
What I would like to know, this question goes out to the many
designers here who maintain sites for a living...What wil I eventually
need to know in order to be successful in creating websites....


This is some of what I feel is important, but don't consider it a definative
list (there are many different aspects to web development).

HTML - Obviously, you will want to know all about writing HTML, and you
should also look into XHTML (the 2 are not very different, at least as far
as the actual markup is concerned). Refer to the specs
(http://www.w3.org/MarkUp/#recommendations).

CSS - Vital to separating content from presentation. Refer to the specs
(http://www.w3.org/Style/CSS/)

Validation - Get into the habit of validating your documents. There are
HTML and CSS validators available on the W3 website.

Graphic Design - You'll want to know your way around some sort of graphic
editing software (ie - Illustrator, PhotoShop, Paint Shop Pro, etc.)

Those are the basics. If you ever want to do any sort of server-side
processing, you'll want to learn something like ASP (and a language like
VBScript) or PHP (or .NET, or Perl/CGI, etc.). If you ever want to do data
driven sites, you'll probaby want to know something about databases, SQL
queries, and ADO. If you want to do any sort of client-side scripting,
you'll want to know something about JavaScript.

I think those are the basics. I may be forgetting something, but at the
moment I think that covers most of the bases. :)
Regards,
Peter Foti
Jul 20 '05 #2

P: n/a
Peter Foti pe***@Idontwantnostinkingemailfromyou.com wrote:
"richk" <ri******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:e2**************************@posting.google.c om...
What I would like to know, this question goes out to the many
designers here who maintain sites for a living...What wil I eventually
need to know in order to be successful in creating websites....


This is some of what I feel is important, but don't consider it a definative
list (there are many different aspects to web development).

HTML

CSS

Validation

Graphic Design

I think those are the basics. I may be forgetting something, but at the
moment I think that covers most of the bases. :)


you certainly are forgetting something

Marketing/Project Management - In particular you will need the ability to
get a client/customer/department head etc to define what they need to get
from a web site and to be able to devise a strategy for achieving those
aims.

SEO - This shouldn't entirely be an add on extra. If the original designer
of a site understands the basics of how search engines operate then it can
save extremely large sums of money spent later on a complete rebuild. This
can be a MAJOR selling point.

Site Architecture - You need to know how to effectively set the content
into a structure that offers the visitor ease of use whilst also
optimising the way that search engines rate the content of each page
(possibly also how to tempt visitors to particular pages in a particular
order).

Finally, it pays to have at least a basic knowledge of how the web
operates on a technical basis and some basic knowledge of what is
happening on the web server. You don't need to know how to set up a server
from scratch (though it would do no harm), you probably won't need that
level of detail. However you shouldn't be freaked by the prospect of
changing .htaccess files etc.

--
eric
www.ericjarvis.co.uk
"live fast, die only if strictly necessary"
Jul 20 '05 #3

P: n/a
Sorry to butt into this thread :)
I would like to create a website that lists local businesses.
I want visitors to be able to search the businesses via a search field
within the html.
Search by business name (with wildcard) and/or business type.

How do I go about doing this? I use dreamweaver.

I want to be able to add new businesses to the website which are
automatically added to the search facility.

Can this be done purley in html?

Thanks

"Peter Foti" <pe***@Idontwantnostinkingemailfromyou.com> wrote in message
news:10*************@corp.supernews.com...
"richk" <ri******@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:e2**************************@posting.google.c om...
What I would like to know, this question goes out to the many
designers here who maintain sites for a living...What wil I eventually
need to know in order to be successful in creating websites....
This is some of what I feel is important, but don't consider it a

definative list (there are many different aspects to web development).

HTML - Obviously, you will want to know all about writing HTML, and you
should also look into XHTML (the 2 are not very different, at least as far
as the actual markup is concerned). Refer to the specs
(http://www.w3.org/MarkUp/#recommendations).

CSS - Vital to separating content from presentation. Refer to the specs
(http://www.w3.org/Style/CSS/)

Validation - Get into the habit of validating your documents. There are
HTML and CSS validators available on the W3 website.

Graphic Design - You'll want to know your way around some sort of graphic
editing software (ie - Illustrator, PhotoShop, Paint Shop Pro, etc.)

Those are the basics. If you ever want to do any sort of server-side
processing, you'll want to learn something like ASP (and a language like
VBScript) or PHP (or .NET, or Perl/CGI, etc.). If you ever want to do data driven sites, you'll probaby want to know something about databases, SQL
queries, and ADO. If you want to do any sort of client-side scripting,
you'll want to know something about JavaScript.

I think those are the basics. I may be forgetting something, but at the
moment I think that covers most of the bases. :)
Regards,
Peter Foti

Jul 20 '05 #4

P: n/a
On Mon, 1 Mar 2004 22:39:59 +0000 (UTC), "Paul" <p_*@hotmail.com>
declared in comp.infosystems.www.authoring.html:
Sorry to butt into this thread :)
It's a free NG. :-)
I would like to create a website that lists local businesses.
I want visitors to be able to search the businesses via a search field
within the html.

Can this be done purley in html?


No. HTML is a markup language, not a scripting/programming language. It
can't *do* anything.

You will need a database (e.g. MySQL, Access), and a server-side
scripting language (e.g. PHP, ASP). Plus the HTML, of course.

BTW: Please don't post upside-down
http://www.allmyfaqs.com/faq.pl?How_to_post

--
Mark Parnell
http://www.clarkecomputers.com.au
Jul 20 '05 #5

P: n/a

"Mark Parnell" <we*******@clarkecomputers.com.au> wrote in message
news:1p*****************************@40tude.net...
On Mon, 1 Mar 2004 22:39:59 +0000 (UTC), "Paul" <p_*@hotmail.com>
declared in comp.infosystems.www.authoring.html:
Sorry to butt into this thread :)


It's a free NG. :-)
I would like to create a website that lists local businesses.
I want visitors to be able to search the businesses via a search field
within the html.

Can this be done purley in html?


No. HTML is a markup language, not a scripting/programming language. It
can't *do* anything.

You will need a database (e.g. MySQL, Access), and a server-side
scripting language (e.g. PHP, ASP). Plus the HTML, of course.

BTW: Please don't post upside-down
http://www.allmyfaqs.com/faq.pl?How_to_post


Oops, sorry about the posting :)
Do you know of any good website to learn the database and server side
scripting?
Jul 20 '05 #6

P: n/a
On Mon, 1 Mar 2004 23:21:52 +0000 (UTC), "Paul" <p_*@hotmail.com>
declared in comp.infosystems.www.authoring.html:
Do you know of any good website to learn the database and server side
scripting?


It depends which way you are going to go. PHP and MySQL are probably
your best bet, but it does depend what your server supports.

To learn PHP, the PHP site is the best place to start.
http://www.php.net

I'm looking for some good beginner's SQL tutorials myself, so I'll let
you know if I find any! :-)

You could probably find something pre-built that would at least do
something similar to what you want, but some knowledge of the
technologies involved would be very helpful.

--
Mark Parnell
http://www.clarkecomputers.com.au
Jul 20 '05 #7

P: n/a
On 1 Mar 2004 11:20:24 -0800, ri******@yahoo.com (richk) wrote:
What wil I eventually
need to know in order to be successful in creating websites....


You'll need to know what "success" means.

Do you want to get rich ?
(Lobotomy, a nice suit and a switch to project management)

Do you want to make pretty pictures ?
(Learn PhotoShop and Quark (or similar), a task which takes several
months minimum to do it right)

Do you want to amuse the children and be generally thought of as a web
guru ?
(Get a shiny new Mac laptop and learn Flash)

Do you want to make technically superior websites that no-one else
cares about ?
(Stick around here, and learn to live on a diet of nuts and berries)

--
Smert' spamionam
Jul 20 '05 #8

P: n/a
From: p_*@hotmail.com (Paul)
Sorry to butt into this thread :)
I would like to create a website that lists
local businesses. I want visitors to be able
to search the businesses via a search
field within the html.


Try http://atomz.com

Web Design-Magic-Painting-Junking-Games
http://www.davmagic.com
Paint A House
http://www.paintahouse.com
Note: My email is ALWAYS Full to avoid SPAM... you can Contact me via my
websites...

Jul 20 '05 #9

P: n/a
From: ri******@yahoo.com (richk)
I'm in the process of teaching myself, or
shall i say in the process of expanding my
knowledge in webdesign. I do have my
own site up and I love doing it. Right now
I do it as a hobby. <snip>What I would like to know, this question
goes out to the many designers here who
maintain sites for a living...What wil I
eventually need to know in order to be
successful in creating websites....


If you're "doing it as a hobby" right now, you're having the most fun...
as soon as you "go professional" it will become WORK... and less fun
(maybe)... but it's your choice... just keep expanding your "database"
of knowledge and keep picking-up new skills as you go along... building
online sources for learning and reference... the other advice in this
thread is very helpful as far as language requirements etc but keep it
simple and free and you'll always enjoy it more!

Good Luck........

Web Design-Magic-Painting-Junking-Games
http://www.davmagic.com
Paint A House
http://www.paintahouse.com
Note: My email is ALWAYS Full to avoid SPAM... you can Contact me via my
websites...

Jul 20 '05 #10

P: n/a
Andy Dingley di*****@codesmiths.com wrote:

Do you want to make technically superior websites that no-one else
cares about ?
(Stick around here, and learn to live on a diet of nuts and berries)


Nuts and berries have been deprecated. We are now supposed to live on a
diet of slugs and worms. Nuts and berries are reserved for sysadmins.

HTH

--
eric
www.ericjarvis.co.uk
all these years I've waited for the revolution
and all we end up getting is spin
Jul 20 '05 #11

P: n/a
On Tue, 2 Mar 2004 01:34:17 -0000, Eric Jarvis <we*@ericjarvis.co.uk>
wrote:
Andy Dingley di*****@codesmiths.com wrote:

Do you want to make technically superior websites that no-one else
cares about ?
(Stick around here, and learn to live on a diet of nuts and berries)


Nuts and berries have been deprecated. We are now supposed to live on a
diet of slugs and worms. Nuts and berries are reserved for sysadmins.

HTH


Well, so what if they're deprecated? Just be 'loose'...

(Some sites I see, I wish the author spent more time with the twig and
berries...)
Jul 20 '05 #12

P: n/a
ri******@yahoo.com (richk) wrote in
news:e2**************************@posting.google.c om:
What I would like to know, this question goes out to the many
designers here who maintain sites for a living...What wil I eventually
need to know in order to be successful in creating websites....


One thing, which isn't actually a web design skill, but can make a *big*
difference in your marketability, is in-depth knowledge of one or more
industries/areas of business. If, for example, you have quite a bit of
knowledge about how the food distribution industry works (i.e. you're
really familiar with the relationships between food producers, food
brokers, and grocery chains) then you'll have a big advantage in marketing
your services to companies in the food industry because you'll be able to
"speak the client's native language." And you'll probably create better
sites/applications for that industry, because you'll have a good
understanding of what the users are trying to get from your work.

Another important factor, which is partially a matter of skill and mostly a
matter of attitude, is the ability to delegate/subcontract certain types of
work. For example, if you're great at site architecture and database
design, but merely good at graphical design, you'll be a lot better off if
you establish a relationship with someone who specializes in graphics
design. And you want that relationship to be reciprocal; you throw
business or subcontract to him when what's needed is graphics work, and he
subcontracts/throws business to you when he gets a job that requires a lot
of architecture/database work.
Jul 20 '05 #13

P: n/a
In news:p6****************************@40tude.net,
Mark Parnell <we*******@clarkecomputers.com.au> decided to write:
| On Mon, 1 Mar 2004 23:21:52 +0000 (UTC), "Paul" <p_*@hotmail.com>
| declared in comp.infosystems.www.authoring.html:
|
|| Do you know of any good website to learn the database and server side
|| scripting?
|
| It depends which way you are going to go. PHP and MySQL are probably
| your best bet, but it does depend what your server supports.
|
| To learn PHP, the PHP site is the best place to start.
| http://www.php.net
|
| I'm looking for some good beginner's SQL tutorials myself, so I'll let
| you know if I find any! :-)
|
| You could probably find something pre-built that would at least do
| something similar to what you want, but some knowledge of the
| technologies involved would be very helpful.

Take a look at http://www.w3schools.com/
--
Brian Lecorchick
Jul 20 '05 #14

P: n/a
On 2 Mar 2004 03:07:35 GMT, Eric Bohlman <eb******@earthlink.net> wrote:
One thing, which isn't actually a web design skill, but can make a *big*
difference in your marketability, is in-depth knowledge of one or more
industries/areas of business. If, for example, you have quite a bit of
knowledge about how the food distribution industry works (i.e. you're
really familiar with the relationships between food producers, food
brokers, and grocery chains) then you'll have a big advantage in
marketing
your services to companies in the food industry because you'll be able to
"speak the client's native language." And you'll probably create better
sites/applications for that industry, because you'll have a good
understanding of what the users are trying to get from your work.


I don't disagee. At all. But I add: never forget that while you can speak
the corporate language, your job is to translate it to the people who
don't know a thing about it.

Too many corporate sites are al about things the average person doesn't
care about. Ever try to track down an email address? An online version of
a users manual? Websites are meant to be used by people who don't know the
first thing about a business - and this is where a lot of websites fall
short.
Jul 20 '05 #15

P: n/a
On Tue, 02 Mar 2004 03:17:33 GMT, "BrianLL"
<bl*********@stopthecrapearthlink.net> declared in
comp.infosystems.www.authoring.html:
| I'm looking for some good beginner's SQL tutorials myself, so I'll let
| you know if I find any! :-)
(I assume this is the part of my post you are replying to)
Take a look at http://www.w3schools.com/


http://www.sqlcourse.com/ looks quite good too.

--
Mark Parnell
http://www.clarkecomputers.com.au
Jul 20 '05 #16

P: n/a
>From: ri******@yahoo.com (richk)

I'm in the process of teaching myself, or shall i say in the process
of expanding my knowledge in webdesign. <snip>What I would like to know, this question goes out to the many
designers here who maintain sites for a living...What wil I eventually
need to know in order to be successful in creating websites....


One thing that helps is where to find the information you need, at the time you
need it. Resources are so valuable. When you need to do something, and you draw
a blank, you'll want to pull up your bookmarks or resource, and find what you
need at that moment so you wont get frustrated. Just like
http://www.howtofreelance.com is a resource, you should have several places to
get help on the fly.
Jul 20 '05 #17

P: n/a
hello wow that takes alot of stright degree to promote your self in a job
market a tool to sell your skills i would say not knowing your resores but try
to get a grant or a loan or a job with a company doing a less demanding task
and get them to formally educate you and train for them as a working employee i
know that its all in the
degrees one obtains as to what his value is in the market place, good luck
sounds like you got the drive champ
Jul 20 '05 #18

P: n/a
Eric Jarvis wrote:
Nuts and berries have been deprecated. We are now supposed to live on a
diet of slugs and worms. Nuts and berries are reserved for sysadmins.


Don't you keep up on the times? Slugs and worms will be deprecated in a
few months, and we're supposed to start practicing the new mud and sand
diet now.
Jul 20 '05 #19

P: n/a
Leif K-Brooks eu*****@ecritters.biz wrote:
Eric Jarvis wrote:
Nuts and berries have been deprecated. We are now supposed to live on a
diet of slugs and worms. Nuts and berries are reserved for sysadmins.


Don't you keep up on the times? Slugs and worms will be deprecated in a
few months, and we're supposed to start practicing the new mud and sand
diet now.


I've been mud and sand compliant for many years...it's standard practise
in the music and theatre businesses

--
eric
www.ericjarvis.co.uk
"live fast, die only if strictly necessary"
Jul 20 '05 #20

P: n/a
On Wed, 3 Mar 2004 18:24:24 -0000, Eric Jarvis <we*@ericjarvis.co.uk>
declared in comp.infosystems.www.authoring.html:
Leif K-Brooks eu*****@ecritters.biz wrote:

Don't you keep up on the times? Slugs and worms will be deprecated in a
few months, and we're supposed to start practicing the new mud and sand
diet now.


I've been mud and sand compliant for many years...it's standard practise
in the music and theatre businesses


I'm already using the rock diet. I know it's only a draft recommendation
at this stage, but I'm anticipating that it will eventually be
finalised.

--
Mark Parnell
http://www.clarkecomputers.com.au
Jul 20 '05 #21

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