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HTML Code for Forwarding

P: n/a
What is the HTML code for forwarding one page to another? I recall
there is a meta statement that can used. In other words, I want
browser inquiries to http://xxx.xx to go immediately to http://yyy.yyy
Jul 20 '05 #1
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P: n/a
Howard Kelley <hk*****@yahoo.com> wrote:
What is the HTML code for forwarding one page to another? I recall
there is a meta statement that can used. In other words, I want
browser inquiries to http://xxx.xx to go immediately to http://yyy.yyy


It would be best to use a standard redirect, like the PHP header() function.
Do you have PHP? See http://www.w3.org/QA/Tips/reback for more on standard
redirects.
--
Michael Wilcox
mjwilco at yahoo dot com
Essential Tools for the Web Developer - http://mikewilcox.t35.com
Jul 20 '05 #2

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On 20 Feb 2004 14:05:15 -0800, Howard Kelley <hk*****@yahoo.com> wrote:
What is the HTML code for forwarding one page to another? I recall
there is a meta statement that can used. In other words, I want
browser inquiries to http://xxx.xx to go immediately to http://yyy.yyy

If you cannot do it in the header of the site, the best HTML code is
something along the lines of:

<p>We've reorganized the site. Please continue to <a href="xxx.html">the
page you're looking for</a> and update your bookmark.</p>
Jul 20 '05 #3

P: n/a
On Fri, 20 Feb 2004, Howard Kelley wrote:
What is the HTML code for forwarding one page to another?
HTML is markup, it doesn't *do* things. Where did you get the idea
that HTML was some kind of command language?
I recall there is a meta statement that can used.
As far as HTML is concerned, the "meta" tag is just a container.
The container can contain all kinds of stuff, some standards-defined
and some just de facto, without HTML really caring what they are.
In other words, I want browser inquiries to http://xxx.xx to go
immediately to http://yyy.yyy


But do your readers want that?

If you set out the real-life requirement, rather than your
"recollection" of something half-remembered and, with respect,
apparently not well-understood, perhaps a good answer would be
possible. But all too often, questions get the answer that they
deserve, rather than the one that they really need.

(My hunch: you might need HTTP 30x status from the server.)
Jul 20 '05 #4

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"Alan J. Flavell" <fl*****@ph.gla.ac.uk> wrote in message news:<Pi******************************@ppepc56.ph. gla.ac.uk>...
On Fri, 20 Feb 2004, Howard Kelley wrote:
What is the HTML code for forwarding one page to another?


HTML is markup, it doesn't *do* things. Where did you get the idea
that HTML was some kind of command language?
I recall there is a meta statement that can used.


As far as HTML is concerned, the "meta" tag is just a container.
The container can contain all kinds of stuff, some standards-defined
and some just de facto, without HTML really caring what they are.
In other words, I want browser inquiries to http://xxx.xx to go
immediately to http://yyy.yyy


But do your readers want that?

If you set out the real-life requirement, rather than your
"recollection" of something half-remembered and, with respect,
apparently not well-understood, perhaps a good answer would be
possible. But all too often, questions get the answer that they
deserve, rather than the one that they really need.

(My hunch: you might need HTTP 30x status from the server.)


The answer to my question -- despite the rather snide remarks from Mr.
Flavell -- is the Meta tag known as REFRESH.

For example: <meta http-equiv="REFRESH"
content="1;URL=HTTP://WWW.xxx.yyy/zzz.htm">

This line on a blank page will forward to another address after a
1-second delay."

You may quibble that HTML doesn't "do anything" but this little line
does route you to another site or page with a minimum of effort. There
are other more exotic ways of accomplishing this but I was looking for
something simple.

Dear Mr. Flavell -- I was coding HTML long before you could spell
it...but sometimes we all have lapses of memory and manners.
Jul 20 '05 #5

P: n/a
On Sat, 21 Feb 2004 19:35:03 -0800, Howard Kelley wrote:
The answer to my question -- despite the rather snide remarks from Mr.
Flavell -- is the Meta tag known as REFRESH.
Do you understand what Mr. Flavell wrote? For that matter, do you
understand what *you* wrote? I doubt.
For example: <meta http-equiv="REFRESH"
content="1;URL=HTTP://WWW.xxx.yyy/zzz.htm">

This line on a blank page will forward to another address after a
1-second delay."

You may quibble that HTML doesn't "do anything" but this little line
does route you to another site or page with a minimum of effort. There
are other more exotic ways of accomplishing this but I was looking for
something simple.
Not in my browser. Mine[1] actually renders it as an *optional* redirect
with the originating page's content below. There is a mechanism in the
web for redirecting browsers much more reliably than this: HTTP
redirection. If your hosting service doesn't allow you to do this, find a
better one. If you're simply too lazy to find the correct solution to
your problem, don't expect us to hold your hand with a half-assed patch
job.
sometimes we all have lapses of memory and manners.


Obviously. Pray come back when you understand why your solution is a bad
idea and why your grasp of what HTML is and is not is loose at best.

[1] Lynx.

--
Some say the Wired doesn't have political borders like the real world,
but there are far too many nonsense-spouting anarchists or idiots who
think that pranks are a revolution.

Jul 20 '05 #6

P: n/a
It seems "Howard Kelley" wrote in
comp.infosystems.www.authoring.html:
For example: <meta http-equiv="REFRESH"
content="1;URL=HTTP://WWW.xxx.yyy/zzz.htm">

You may quibble that HTML doesn't "do anything" but this little line
does route you to another site or page with a minimum of effort.


It also destroys your visitors' "back" button and slows down their
browsing.

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Cortland County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
HTML 4.01 spec: http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/
validator: http://validator.w3.org/
CSS 2 spec: http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-CSS2/
2.1 changes: http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS21/changes.html
validator: http://jigsaw.w3.org/css-validator/
Jul 20 '05 #7

P: n/a
On Sun, 22 Feb 2004, Owen Jacobson wrote:
On Sat, 21 Feb 2004 19:35:03 -0800, Howard Kelley wrote:
The answer to my question -- despite the rather snide remarks from Mr.
Flavell -- is the Meta tag known as REFRESH.


Do you understand what Mr. Flavell wrote? For that matter, do you
understand what *you* wrote? I doubt.


I am sometimes curious as to why certain people stubbornly promote
widely-known bad answers, even when confronted with the
well-engineered soluion. One might draw certain conclusions from the
fact that they rarely ask for more details of what the questioner is
really trying to achieve, nor make any attempt to bring the questioner
up to speed on relevant concepts (in fact, as in this case, they'd
prefer to obfuscate the issues of just where the defined interworking
boundaries lie), nor make any mention of the potential disadvantages
of their promoted method - which suggests that they're either unaware
of them (which is no position to be in when offering advice) or prefer
not to reveal them (which is worse).

After all, by the time that the questioner learns about such problems
they adviser will probably be long gone, like certain "consultants" I
could remember having to deal with.

http://groups.google.com/groups?as_u...oward%20kelley
For example: <meta http-equiv="REFRESH"
content="1;URL=HTTP://WWW.xxx.yyy/zzz.htm">

This line on a blank page will forward to another address after a
1-second delay."
It might do that, or not, depending on the client agent and user
options. What it will surely do is earn a WAI violation, amongst
other disadvantages. And search engines will have no clear idea
what's going on.
You may quibble that HTML doesn't "do anything" but this little line
does route you to another site or page
As I said, as far as HTML is concerned, "meta" is just a container.
HTML doesn't deal with the details of what that container could hold.

In this case it's purporting to be an http-equiv, meaning that it's
purporting to be equivalent to some specified HTTP header. But
RFC2616 doesn't codify such a header - it's a vendor extension, which
indeed has been rather widely implemented, but like all vendor
extensions, it's been done with the aim of wowing the suggestible,
rather than achieving a well-engineered solution to an already-solved
problem.

This extension does have its uses, I admit, in appropriate contexts
and with consenting users; but as a substitute for HTTP status 30x it
can only be rated as bogus, by anyone who understands the wider
picture.
with a minimum of effort.


Naturally, the "minimum of effort" by the author is always preferable
to doing the job properly in the interests of the user - well, in some
people's catechism, anyway. Sigh.
Jul 20 '05 #8

P: n/a
Howard Kelley <hk*****@yahoo.com> wrote:
The answer to my question -- despite the rather snide remarks from Mr.
Flavell -- is the Meta tag known as REFRESH.
No, it's known as a meta tag.
This line on a blank page will forward to another address after a
1-second delay."
You may quibble that HTML doesn't "do anything" but this little line
does route you to another site or page with a minimum of effort.
Not in every browser. I've got my web filter, Proxomitron, set to remove any
"refreshes" as replace them with text links. I maitain the usability of my
back button this way.

The refresh function is something that can be recognized by many, but not
all, browsers (or users).
There
are other more exotic ways of accomplishing this but I was looking for
something simple.


I think the exotic ways your are thinking of are actually the correct ways,
if you're refering to anything like a standard redirect. More at
http://www.w3.org/QA/Tips/reback
--
Michael Wilcox
mjwilco at yahoo dot com
Essential Tools for the Web Developer - http://mikewilcox.t35.com
Jul 20 '05 #9

P: n/a
In article <96**************************@posting.google.com >,
hk*****@yahoo.com enlightened us with...

The answer to my question -- despite the rather snide remarks from Mr.
Flavell -- is the Meta tag known as REFRESH.

For example: <meta http-equiv="REFRESH"
content="1;URL=HTTP://WWW.xxx.yyy/zzz.htm">

This line on a blank page will forward to another address after a
1-second delay."


Not in my IE6 it won't. I disable that crap.

--
--
~kaeli~
Santa's helpers are subordinate clauses.
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/wildAtHeart
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/kaelisSpace

Jul 20 '05 #10

P: n/a
hk*****@yahoo.com (Howard Kelley) wrote in message
The answer to my question -- despite the rather snide remarks from Mr.
Flavell -- is the Meta tag known as REFRESH.

Dear Mr. Flavell -- I was coding HTML long before you could spell
it...but sometimes we all have lapses of memory and manners.


Well said and about time to. The guy is a jumped up prick.

EC
..
Jul 20 '05 #11

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