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Testing my website's appearance

P: n/a
I'm designing a website for some relatives and would like to know if
there's a program or something that will show what the web pages will
look like on a Mac or other operating systems. I've tested it using
Windows 98 and XP, IE 6 and 5, and Mozilla 1.4. I've also tested by
changing the screen resloutions and such things. I'm glad I did
because there were some things that needed fixing. But I want to see
how the website will look on a Mac but I don't know anyone who uses
one. None of the local schools, libraries, cafes, etc. have one. They
all use PCs.
Jul 20 '05 #1
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20 Replies


P: n/a
Els

Mike wrote:
I'm designing a website for some relatives and would like to know if
there's a program or something that will show what the web pages will
look like on a Mac or other operating systems.


www.browsercam.com

--
Els

Mente humana é como pára-quedas; funciona melhor aberta.

Jul 20 '05 #2

P: n/a
In article <3e**************************@posting.google.com >,
li************@yahoo.com (Mike) wrote:
I'm designing a website for some relatives and would like to know if
there's a program or something that will show what the web pages will
look like on a Mac or other operating systems.


URL? It'll be done for you.

leo

--
<http://web0.greatbasin.net/~leo/>
Jul 20 '05 #3

P: n/a
In article <3e**************************@posting.google.com >,
li************@yahoo.com (Mike) wrote:
I'm designing a website for some relatives and would like to know if
there's a program or something that will show what the web pages will
look like on a Mac or other operating systems.


http://www.danvine.com/icapture/

--
Kris
<kr*******@xs4all.netherlands> (nl)
<http://www.cinnamon.nl/>
Jul 20 '05 #4

P: n/a
Els

Kris wrote:
In article <3e**************************@posting.google.com >,
li************@yahoo.com (Mike) wrote:

I'm designing a website for some relatives and would like to know if
there's a program or something that will show what the web pages will
look like on a Mac or other operating systems.

http://www.danvine.com/icapture/


Looks like something very useful, and works on certain pages
I tried, but when I enter my test page
http://home.tiscali.nl/~elizabeth/test-8.html
and the older version
http://home.tiscali.nl/~elizabeth/test-6.html
(absolute positioning inside absolute positioned element
gave me probs with Safari on another site), it came up with
just white space. Is that really what Safari users see??
At least something should be visible, I thought, as it works
on pc: IE6.0, NS7.1, Opera7.23.

Could anyone with a real Safari browser have a look for me?
Both on 'test-6' and on 'test-8'?

--
Els

Mente humana é como pára-quedas; funciona melhor aberta.

Jul 20 '05 #5

P: n/a
In article <40**********************@dreader2.news.tiscali.nl >,
Els <el***********@tiscali.nl.invalid> wrote:
Kris wrote:
In article <3e**************************@posting.google.com >,
li************@yahoo.com (Mike) wrote:

I'm designing a website for some relatives and would like to know if
there's a program or something that will show what the web pages will
look like on a Mac or other operating systems.

http://www.danvine.com/icapture/


Looks like something very useful, and works on certain pages
I tried, but when I enter my test page
http://home.tiscali.nl/~elizabeth/test-8.html
and the older version
http://home.tiscali.nl/~elizabeth/test-6.html
(absolute positioning inside absolute positioned element
gave me probs with Safari on another site), it came up with
just white space. Is that really what Safari users see??
At least something should be visible, I thought, as it works
on pc: IE6.0, NS7.1, Opera7.23.

Could anyone with a real Safari browser have a look for me?
Both on 'test-6' and on 'test-8'?


Works fin on that browser but iCab mangles the text next to the pictures.
Jul 20 '05 #6

P: n/a
Els

Bruce Grubb wrote:
In article <40**********************@dreader2.news.tiscali.nl >,
Els <el***********@tiscali.nl.invalid> wrote:
http://home.tiscali.nl/~elizabeth/test-8.html
http://home.tiscali.nl/~elizabeth/test-6.html
Could anyone with a real Safari browser have a look for me?
Both on 'test-6' and on 'test-8'?


Works fin on that browser but iCab mangles the text next to the pictures.


Thanks Bruce, but what is iCab, and how is the text mangled?

--
Els

Mente humana é como pára-quedas; funciona melhor aberta.

Jul 20 '05 #7

P: n/a
In article <40**********************@dreader2.news.tiscali.nl >,
Els <el***********@tiscali.nl.invalid> wrote:
http://www.danvine.com/icapture/


Looks like something very useful, and works on certain pages
I tried, but when I enter my test page
http://home.tiscali.nl/~elizabeth/test-8.html
and the older version
http://home.tiscali.nl/~elizabeth/test-6.html
(absolute positioning inside absolute positioned element
gave me probs with Safari on another site), it came up with
just white space. Is that really what Safari users see??
At least something should be visible, I thought, as it works
on pc: IE6.0, NS7.1, Opera7.23.

Could anyone with a real Safari browser have a look for me?
Both on 'test-6' and on 'test-8'?


What you see is a real Safari browser. It is an automatic screenshot of
someone's browser.

<http://home.tiscali.nl/~elizabeth/test-8.html>
No white screen.

<http://home.tiscali.nl/~elizabeth/test-6.html>
No white screen either.

A possible explanation is that due to heavy traffic the browser did not
finish loading yet and iCapture displayed a blank screen. This is
described in the FAQ. If it happens, make another attempt later.

--
Kris
<kr*******@xs4all.netherlands> (nl)
<http://www.cinnamon.nl/>
Jul 20 '05 #8

P: n/a
In article <40**********************@dreader2.news.tiscali.nl >,
Els <el***********@tiscali.nl.invalid> wrote:
Works fin on that browser but iCab mangles the text next to the pictures.


Thanks Bruce, but what is iCab, and how is the text mangled?


iCab is a macintosh webbrowser, after years and years still in beta.
It's support for even CSS-1 is far from complete. For that reason it
should not be taken seriously by developers.

--
Kris
<kr*******@xs4all.netherlands> (nl)
<http://www.cinnamon.nl/>
Jul 20 '05 #9

P: n/a
In article <40**********************@dreader2.news.tiscali.nl >,
Els <el***********@tiscali.nl.invalid> wrote:
http://www.danvine.com/icapture/


Looks like something very useful, and works on certain pages
I tried, but when I enter my test page
http://home.tiscali.nl/~elizabeth/test-8.html
and the older version
http://home.tiscali.nl/~elizabeth/test-6.html


BTW, this may be some handy tool for you as well. :)
<http://www.lipsum.com/>

--
Kris
<kr*******@xs4all.netherlands> (nl)
<http://www.cinnamon.nl/>
Jul 20 '05 #10

P: n/a
Els
Instead of replying three times, I'll mix'em up all here:

Kris wrote:
Els wrote:
Bruce Grubb wrote:
[http://www.danvine.com/icapture/]
http://home.tiscali.nl/~elizabeth/test-8.html
http://home.tiscali.nl/~elizabeth/test-6.html
Could anyone with a real Safari browser have a look for me?
Both on 'test-6' and on 'test-8'?

Works fin on that browser but iCab mangles the text next to the pictures.
Thanks Bruce, but what is iCab, and how is the text mangled?


iCab is a macintosh webbrowser, after years and years still in beta.
It's support for even CSS-1 is far from complete. For that reason it
should not be taken seriously by developers.


Good to know :-)
What you see is a real Safari browser. It is an automatic screenshot of
someone's browser.

<http://home.tiscali.nl/~elizabeth/test-8.html>
No white screen.

<http://home.tiscali.nl/~elizabeth/test-6.html>
No white screen either.

A possible explanation is that due to heavy traffic the browser did not
finish loading yet and iCapture displayed a blank screen. This is
described in the FAQ. If it happens, make another attempt later.
Probably the Tiscali server that was slow then, as at the
same time I saw good shots of other pages on a different server.
BTW, this may be some handy tool for you as well. :)
<http://www.lipsum.com/>


Yeah, John Bokma showed me that one the other day, I just
thought bla bla looked okay ;-)
But I'll give te Latin a chance next version of the testpage.

Thanks :-)

--
Els

Mente humana é como pára-quedas; funciona melhor aberta.

Jul 20 '05 #11

P: n/a
Tim
On Mon, 09 Feb 2004 09:09:01 +0100,
Kris <kr*******@xs4all.netherlands> wrote:
iCab is a macintosh webbrowser, after years and years still in beta.
It's support for even CSS-1 is far from complete. For that reason it
should not be taken seriously by developers.


Perhaps it should, in the sense of realising that people still use
browsers that mightn't support what you're trying to do.

--
My "from" address is totally fake. The reply-to address is real, but
may be only temporary. Reply to usenet postings in the same place as
you read the message you're replying to.

This message was sent without a virus, please delete some files yourself.
Jul 20 '05 #12

P: n/a
"Tim" <Ti*@mail.localhost> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:4e********************************@4ax.com...
On Mon, 09 Feb 2004 09:09:01 +0100,
Kris <kr*******@xs4all.netherlands> wrote:
iCab is a macintosh webbrowser, after years and years still in beta.
It's support for even CSS-1 is far from complete. For that reason it
should not be taken seriously by developers.


Perhaps it should, in the sense of realising that people still use
browsers that mightn't support what you're trying to do.


This is true for Netscape 4.x which unfortunately is still a widespread
reality, which I doubt for iCab.

--
Markus
Jul 20 '05 #13

P: n/a
In article <40***********************@news.easynet.ch>,
"Markus Ernst" <derernst@NO#SP#AMgmx.ch> wrote:
"Tim" <Ti*@mail.localhost> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:4e********************************@4ax.com...
On Mon, 09 Feb 2004 09:09:01 +0100,
Kris <kr*******@xs4all.netherlands> wrote:
iCab is a macintosh webbrowser, after years and years still in beta.
It's support for even CSS-1 is far from complete. For that reason it
should not be taken seriously by developers.


Perhaps it should, in the sense of realising that people still use
browsers that mightn't support what you're trying to do.


This is true for Netscape 4.x which unfortunately is still a widespread
reality, which I doubt for iCab.


You should not build sites that are dependant on CSS (or the way they
look in general). Then this is not much of a problem either.
Unfortunately, that is not one of the first things they teach in CSS
tutorials.

--
Kris
<kr*******@xs4all.netherlands> (nl)
<http://www.cinnamon.nl/>
Jul 20 '05 #14

P: n/a
In article <kr*****************************@news1.news.xs4all .nl>,
Kris <kr*******@xs4all.netherlands> wrote:
In article <40**********************@dreader2.news.tiscali.nl >,
Els <el***********@tiscali.nl.invalid> wrote:
Works fin on that browser but iCab mangles the text next to the pictures.


Thanks Bruce, but what is iCab, and how is the text mangled?


iCab is a macintosh webbrowser, after years and years still in beta.
It's support for even CSS-1 is far from complete. For that reason it
should not be taken seriously by developers.


Actually iCab is more useful for its built-in HTML verifier than anything
else. Personally given the number of free broswer why anyone would ever
pay for one is beyond me.
Jul 20 '05 #15

P: n/a
In article <40***********************@news.easynet.ch>,
"Markus Ernst" <derernst@NO#SP#AMgmx.ch> wrote:
"Tim" <Ti*@mail.localhost> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
news:4e********************************@4ax.com...
On Mon, 09 Feb 2004 09:09:01 +0100,
Kris <kr*******@xs4all.netherlands> wrote:
iCab is a macintosh webbrowser, after years and years still in beta.
It's support for even CSS-1 is far from complete. For that reason it
should not be taken seriously by developers.


Perhaps it should, in the sense of realising that people still use
browsers that mightn't support what you're trying to do.


This is true for Netscape 4.x which unfortunately is still a widespread
reality, which I doubt for iCab.


True BUT iCab has one thing that AFIK no other bowser has - a built in HMTL
verification program. You can even set it as to what HTML standard (2.0,
3.2, 4.0 strict, transitional, or frameset) the page is held to.

Furthermore with iCab you can have the verifier ignore the page's specified
DOCTYPE to see if older browers will have problems with it. For example
you can test an HTML 4.0 transitional page for HTML 3.2 and even 2.0
compatability.

These featured are what make iCab useful. As a broswer it does I admit it
does leave something to be desired at times.
Jul 20 '05 #16

P: n/a
Tim
On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 15:39:14 +0100,
Kris <kr*******@xs4all.netherlands> wrote:
You should not build sites that are dependant on CSS (or the way they
look in general).
(Or that depend on anything special.)
Then this is not much of a problem either.
Unfortunately, that is not one of the first things they teach in CSS
tutorials.


Reminds me of the lessons I gave in television production: Long before
people get to play with the equipment, the first rules are drummed into
their heads, starting with don't break things (don't stand on cables,
check before you change/interrupt anything, undo locks before moving,
redo locks before leaving, don't film lights, and keep liquids away from
the electrical gear which is all connected together - including the guy
wearing headphones two rooms away when you cross-connect 240 Volts with
a microphone line).

Very little of that was what they're expecting to have to know about,
but those that learnt the golden rules were in a position to manage
everything, and everybody, else. Anybody who only learnt a tiny
fraction about what they were specifically doing, couldn't do anything
else (and caused problems for other people).

--
My "from" address is totally fake. The reply-to address is real, but
may be only temporary. Reply to usenet postings in the same place as
you read the message you're replying to.

This message was sent without a virus, please delete some files yourself.
Jul 20 '05 #17

P: n/a
Bruce Grubb wrote:
In article <kr*****************************@news1.news.xs4all .nl>,
Kris <kr*******@xs4all.netherlands> wrote:

iCab is a macintosh webbrowser, after years and years still in beta.
It's support for even CSS-1 is far from complete. For that reason it
should not be taken seriously by developers.


Actually iCab is more useful for its built-in HTML verifier than anything
else.


These days you can use bookmarklets/favlets to do pretty much the same
thing in other browsers. I find iCab's usefulness pretty questionable.
Like NS4, it is best used with CSS disabled.

--
Reply address is a bottomless spam bucket.
Please reply to the group so everyone can share.
Jul 20 '05 #18

P: n/a
In article <bg**************************@news.zianet.com>,
Bruce Grubb <bg****@zianet.com> wrote:
In article <40**********************@dreader2.news.tiscali.nl >,
Els <el***********@tiscali.nl.invalid> wrote:
Kris wrote:
In article <3e**************************@posting.google.com >,
li************@yahoo.com (Mike) wrote:
>I'm designing a website for some relatives and would like to know if
>there's a program or something that will show what the web pages will
>look like on a Mac or other operating systems.
http://www.danvine.com/icapture/


Looks like something very useful, and works on certain pages
I tried, but when I enter my test page
http://home.tiscali.nl/~elizabeth/test-8.html
and the older version
http://home.tiscali.nl/~elizabeth/test-6.html
(absolute positioning inside absolute positioned element
gave me probs with Safari on another site), it came up with
just white space. Is that really what Safari users see??
At least something should be visible, I thought, as it works
on pc: IE6.0, NS7.1, Opera7.23.

Could anyone with a real Safari browser have a look for me?
Both on 'test-6' and on 'test-8'?


Works fin on that browser but iCab mangles the text next to the pictures.


iCab mangles anything that heavily relies on CSS for layout. Anyone
using iCab (like me) is used to this and is eagerly awaiting the
promised 3.0 version that will finally have full CSS2 support.

--
| Andrew Glasgow <amg39(at)cornell.edu> |
|"I am astounded ... at the wonderful power you have developed -- and |
|terrified at the thought that so much hideous and bad music may be put on |
|record forever." -- Arthur Sullivan, 1888, upon viewing Edison's phonograph|
Jul 20 '05 #19

P: n/a
Andrew Glasgow wrote:

iCab mangles anything that heavily relies on CSS for layout. Anyone
using iCab (like me) is used to this and is eagerly awaiting the
promised 3.0 version that will finally have full CSS2 support.


Wow, a real iCab user! Tell me, what is it about iCab that makes you
stick with it? I'm curious, since I personally can't find any real
redeeming qualities about it. Inquiring minds want to know...

--
Reply address is a bottomless spam bucket.
Please reply to the group so everyone can share.
Jul 20 '05 #20

P: n/a
In article <c0*************@ID-224809.news.uni-berlin.de>,
kchayka <us****@c-net.us> wrote:
Andrew Glasgow wrote:

iCab mangles anything that heavily relies on CSS for layout. Anyone
using iCab (like me) is used to this and is eagerly awaiting the
promised 3.0 version that will finally have full CSS2 support.


Wow, a real iCab user! Tell me, what is it about iCab that makes you
stick with it? I'm curious, since I personally can't find any real
redeeming qualities about it. Inquiring minds want to know...


Well I've got a somewhat older Mac and Mozilla is too slow on it. I
also can't use the latest version of Mozilla or Firebird or Safari since
I don't have OS X. It's got tabs which are a MUST, and it even has a
setting where code that would normally open new browser windows open new
tabs intead. It's also set up so that clicking links in my email or
other apps opens a new window with the link instead, and I like the
comprehensive contestual menus. It starts up faster than IE or Mozilla,
renders pages reasonably fast, has a download manager, and has useful
filters and whatnot including built-in pop-up blocking. and most of the
CSS annoyances still leave the pages usable if not pretty.

Basically I'm just used to it.

--
| Andrew Glasgow <amg39(at)cornell.edu> |
| "The ordinary telegraph is like a very long cat. You pull the tail in New |
| York, and it meows in Los Angeles. The wireless is the same, only without |
| the cat." -- Albert Einstein |
Jul 20 '05 #21

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