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Are <META> keywords language/DOCTYPE dependent ?

P: n/a
Assume I declare at the top of a HTML page:

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">

This refers to english HTML content/syntax. Later then I declare:

<META NAME="keywords" CONTENT=".... ... .... ">

Should the keywords also be in english? or is it possible to enter words from other language
(and with other language specific chars like german umlaute, french accents, spanisch question marks,...)?

Do visiting search engines understand a mix of words from multiple languages ?

Can I enter speical chars like the german "" directly or do I have to type &Auml; inside the META-Tags ?

Wladi

Jul 20 '05 #1
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5 Replies


P: n/a
wl*******@gmx.net (Wladimir Borsov) wrote in
news:bv*************@news.t-online.com:
Assume I declare at the top of a HTML page:

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">

This refers to english HTML content/syntax. Later then I declare:


No it doesn't. It refers to the DTD itself (including comments) being
written in English. It doesn't refer at all to the contents of the
document.
Jul 20 '05 #2

P: n/a
Wladimir Borsov wrote:
Assume I declare at the top of a HTML page:

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
EN means that the markup language is in English (IIRC). Hence, you have
<body> instead of <corpus>.

This refers to english HTML content/syntax. Later then I declare:

<META NAME="keywords" CONTENT=".... ... .... ">

Should the keywords also be in english? or is it possible to enter words from other language
(and with other language specific chars like german umlaute, french accents, spanisch question marks,...)?
This is in the spec. Use "lang":
<meta name="description" content="My Site" lang="en">
<meta name="description" content="Mein Seiten" lang="de">

To indicate the language of the whole document use "lang" on the "html"
element. Also, the Content-Language HTTP header exists (used for
content negotiation).

Do visiting search engines understand a mix of words from multiple languages ?
They should, according to the spec. But it's doubtful that they do.

Can I enter speical chars like the german "" directly?


If you use a character set that includes German characters (and assuming
users' fonts have the characters).

Jul 20 '05 #3

P: n/a
wl*******@gmx.net (Wladimir Borsov) wrote:
Assume I declare at the top of a HTML page:

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">

This refers to english HTML content/syntax.
It refers to the fact that the referenced HTML spec and DTD are in
English. Nothing more than that.
Later then I declare:

<META NAME="keywords" CONTENT=".... ... .... ">

Should the keywords also be in english?
What language is the page itself in?
or is it possible to enter words from other language
It's possible. But do those other languages appear in the page itself?
(and with other language specific chars like german umlaute, french accents, spanisch question marks,...)?
Can I enter speical chars like the german "" directly or do I have to type &Auml; inside the META-Tags ?
The content of the, um, content attribute is CDATA and so in HTML you
can use the naked characters (if the character encoding used includes
it) or the corresponding character reference.
Do visiting search engines understand a mix of words from multiple languages ?


Yes, no, maybe. Search engines are somewhat unpredictable when it
comes to languages.

However, almost all search engines ignore meta keywords entirely these
days so its really a waste of time to worry about them.

Steve

--
"My theories appal you, my heresies outrage you,
I never answer letters and you don't like my tie." - The Doctor

Steve Pugh <st***@pugh.net> <http://steve.pugh.net/>
Jul 20 '05 #4

P: n/a
Wladimir Borsov wrote:
Assume I declare at the top of a HTML page:

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">

This refers to english HTML content/syntax.
You believe wrong. It does not specify a (human) language at all. That's
not what DOCTYPEs are for.

To specify the language of the document do one or more of:

1. Set the "Content-Language" HTTP header.
2. Use a http-equiv="Content-Language" <meta> tag.
3. Set the lang attribute on the <html> element.
Can I enter speical chars like the german "Ä" directly or do I have to
type &Auml; inside the META-Tags ?


This is an unrelated matter and has to do with the character set specified
on the page -- not the language. To specify which character set you are
using, do on of more of the following:

1. Add a charset attribute to the "Content-Type" HTTP header.
2. Use a http-equiv="Content-Type" <meta> tag and specify a charset
attribute similarly.

However, entities and character references, such as "&Auml;" should work
all the time: doesn't matter which charset you're using.

--
Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
Contact Me - http://www.goddamn.co.uk/tobyink/?page=132

Jul 20 '05 #5

P: n/a
On Wed, 28 Jan 2004, Wladimir Borsov wrote:
<META NAME="keywords" CONTENT=".... ... .... ">
Do visiting search engines understand a mix of words from multiple languages ?


They don't give a shit about <meta keywords>.

Jul 20 '05 #6

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