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non html tags

P: n/a
What's the rules about rendering non-html tags, for example:

<xsl:template match="editor1" mode="editor" />

What I would like is for nothing to appear, and that seems to be what I've
observed so far. Is that reasonable html?

I've been writing template editable and driven pages and it's occured to
me that I can use templates to write other templates... if I can leave in
the xsl tags.

Cheers,
Jeff
Jul 20 '05 #1
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P: n/a
Jeff Thies wrote:
What's the rules about rendering non-html tags, for example:

<xsl:template match="editor1" mode="editor" />


http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/conform.html

# This specification does not define how conforming user agents handle
# general error conditions, including how user agents behave when they
# encounter elements, attributes, attribute values, or entities not
# specified in this document.

http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/appendix/...s-invalid-docs

#However, to facilitate experimentation and interoperability between
# implementations of various versions of HTML, we recommend the following
# behavior:

# * If a user agent encounters an element it does not recognize, it
# should try to render the element's content.
# * If a user agent encounters an attribute it does not recognize, it
# should ignore the entire attribute specification (i.e., the attribute and
# its value).
# * If a user agent encounters an attribute value it doesn't recognize,
# it should use the default attribute value.
# * If it encounters an undeclared entity, the entity should be treated
# as character data.

# We also recommend that user agents provide support for notifying the user
# of such errors.

# Since user agents may vary in how they handle error conditions, authors
# and users must not rely on specific error recovery behavior.

.... so make sure you only actually send real (and valid) HTML to the client
(at least when you are using a content type other then text/html)

--
David Dorward <http://dorward.me.uk/>
Jul 20 '05 #2

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