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euro symbol

P: n/a
MH
Thai may have been asked before but I'm new here....

How can I put the Euro symbol, ? using alt0128 in my page and get it
validated as HTML 4.01 ?

--------------
MH
Jul 20 '05 #1
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"MH" <no****@nowhere.no> wrote:
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Encode text using: None
How can I put the Euro symbol, ? using alt0128 in my page and get it
validated as HTML 4.01 ?


&euro;
http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/html/euro.html

--
Top-posting.
What's the most irritating thing on Usenet?
Jul 20 '05 #2

P: n/a
"MH" <no****@nowhere.no> wrote:
Thai may have been asked before
Indeed, a few dozens of times.
but I'm new here....
That's a special reason why you should check the FAQs and archives.
How can I put the Euro symbol, ?
Well, I really suggest using the word "euro", in a suitable form. It's
a start anyway to get the _name_ of the currency right. :-)
using alt0128 in my page and get it
validated as HTML 4.01 ?


Maybe, if you declare a suitable encoding. But that's a wrong way.

For WWW authoring, make your choice between the following:
&euro;

remembering that the latter works somewhat more often. There are other
options too, like using U+20AC as actual character data in a UTF-8
encoded document. When using a UTF-8 capable editor, you could see the
euro symbol itself when editing the HTML document.

More info: http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/html/euro.html

--
Yucca, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
Pages about Web authoring: http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/www.html

Jul 20 '05 #3

P: n/a
In message <Xn*****************************@193.229.0.31>, Jukka K.
Korpela <jk******@cs.tut.fi> writes
using alt0128 in my page and get it
validated as HTML 4.01 ?


Maybe, if you declare a suitable encoding. But that's a wrong way.


In the particular case of using a Unicode-aware editor on Windows (like
Notepad), that would actually work correctly. That is to say, inserting
the euro symbol with alt+0128 and then saving as UTF-8 results in the
correct UTF-8 byte sequence for U+20AC, not the Windows-1252 character
#128. (Although as you say, you would have to declare a suitable
encoding, i.e. charset=utf-8 in this case.)

Not that that's a recommendation as such, just an observation.

--
George Lund
Jul 20 '05 #4

P: n/a
MH
> &euro;
http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/html/euro.html


That was easy, thank you.
--------
MH
Jul 20 '05 #5

P: n/a
MH
> > That may have been asked before
Indeed, a few dozens of times.
but I'm new here....

That's a special reason why you should check the FAQs and archives.


I did, at http://www.htmlhelp.com/faq/ but there was nothing there....
Maybe, if you declare a suitable encoding. But that's a wrong way.

'iso-8859-1' so I thought that would be OK....

Anyway, &euro; did the trick, see.
http://members.home.nl/ghilvers/saab.../9596motor.htm

--------
MH
Jul 20 '05 #6

P: n/a

"Jukka K. Korpela" <jk******@cs.tut.fi> wrote in message
news:Xn*****************************@193.229.0.31. ..
"MH" <no****@nowhere.no> wrote:
Thai may have been asked before


Indeed, a few dozens of times.
but I'm new here....


That's a special reason why you should check the FAQs and archives.
How can I put the Euro symbol, ?


Well, I really suggest using the word "euro", in a suitable form. It's
a start anyway to get the _name_ of the currency right. :-)
using alt0128 in my page and get it
validated as HTML 4.01 ?


Maybe, if you declare a suitable encoding. But that's a wrong way.


I don't know where Alt-0128 came from, but is it wrong if I do Alt-0164 (in
Windows), declare encoding ISO-8859-15, and don't mind that in my editor it
looks like the old generic currency symbol? I thought I had gotten the knack
of these encodings, but maybe I'm still not quite getting it.

Jul 20 '05 #7

P: n/a
Harlan Messinger:
I don't know where Alt-0128 came from, but is it wrong if I do Alt-0164 (in
Windows), declare encoding ISO-8859-15, and don't mind that in my editor it
looks like the old generic currency symbol? I thought I had gotten the knack
of these encodings, but maybe I'm still not quite getting it.


That's formally OK, but I'd advice sticking to safer (more widespread)
encodings, such as ISO-8859-1 or UTF-8. Of those only UTF-8 makes it
possible to enter a euro symbol directly (and only if your text editor
can handle UTF-8).

The safest bet is to use "€" and the encoding "UTF-8".

Even safer (safer than safest) is just writing the word "euro".

--
Bertilo Wennergren <be******@gmx.net> <http://www.bertilow.com>
Jul 20 '05 #8

P: n/a
Bertilo Wennergren <be******@gmx.net> wrote:
Even safer (safer than safest) is just writing the word "euro".


:-)
But &euro; is even understood by Netscape 4.08 (four zero eight).
Jul 20 '05 #9

P: n/a
"Harlan Messinger" <h.*********@comcast.net> wrote:
I don't know where Alt-0128 came from, but is it wrong if I do Alt-0164 (in
Windows), declare encoding ISO-8859-15, and don't mind that in my editor it
looks like the old generic currency symbol?


No version of Netscape 4.x for Macintosh will recognize ISO-8859-15,
but even Netscape 4.08 for Mac will display &euro; as euro sign
or as currency code EUR.
Jul 20 '05 #10

P: n/a
Andreas Prilop:
Bertilo Wennergren <be******@gmx.net> wrote:
Even safer (safer than safest) is just writing the word "euro".

:-)
But &euro; is even understood by Netscape 4.08 (four zero eight).


You never know. By and large a numerical character reference is
probably safer than "&euro;".

On the other hand, if a browser doesn't get it, it might display
"&euro;" as is, which isn't too bad. But if a browser displays
a numerical character reference as is, the result is, let's say,
less than satisfactory.

And then there is of course the factor of authoring ease: "&euro;"
is rather easier to remember and to understand when you're dealing
with the naked horror of the (X)HTML code.

--
Bertilo Wennergren <be******@gmx.net> <http://www.bertilow.com>
Jul 20 '05 #11

P: n/a
On Thu, 18 Dec 2003, Harlan Messinger wrote:

[quoting Jukka]
I don't know where Alt-0128 came from,
Well, Jukka does, and so do I (Windows-1252).
but is it wrong if I do Alt-0164 (in
Windows), declare encoding ISO-8859-15, and don't mind that in my editor it
looks like the old generic currency symbol?
It sounds like a messy way to achieve a sub-optimal result.

iso-8859-15 is all very well in its way, and is getting used quite
widely to encode plain text; but there really is no point in trying to
encode HTML data in iso-8859-15. Browser support for utf-8 has, in my
estimation, been somewhat ahead of support for iso-8859-15 throughout,
and I don't recall seeing an instance where the use of iso-8859-15 for
HTML had brought benefits relative to the various options discussed in
my checklist (see below).

If in fact the only iso-8859-15 character that you want is the euro
sign, then &euro; is now quite widely supported even when the coding
is defined to be iso-8859-1, although somewhat wider coverage can be
achieved by using the correct (i.e unicode) numerical character
reference, as other followups already said.
I thought I had gotten the knack of these encodings, but maybe I'm
still not quite getting it.


I would recommend following Jukka's advice for this issue; if you want
to see a wider review of the options for character representation in
various contexts, then may I suggest starting at my character
checklist http://ppewww.ph.gla.ac.uk/~flavell/charset/checklist and
following pointers to any more-detailed issues that take your
interest.

Jul 20 '05 #12

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