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My view. anyone that doesn't like it tough, click off and stop reading it.

P: n/a
My view. anyone that doesn't like it tough, click off and stop reading it.

I have spent the last 45 minutes reading through all the posts, and I
believe that you have all missed the mark of that post.

The post was not about strict or transitional pages, it wasn't even about
getting an opinion on the "cat eye designs" website.

In my humble opinion, you should have shut your mouth Spartanicus and minded
your own business. The message was between Ryan Burley and Chris.

I believe Ryan has done an outstanding job if he has developed his website
in Transitional, and used tables for layout.

Why I believe that Ryan has done an outstanding job is because for the past
4 months I have done research into W3C standards and how to code with Strict
and Transitional pages.

During my research I discovered a bug while trying to use CSS to layout in a
table format. They did not look the same in both Internet Explorer 6 and
Netscape 7. So I was forced to use tables in order to get the look I wanted.

I personally mix DIV with tables so that when (in the future) my pages will
be easily updateable to strict.

Another thing, at least Ryan is actively searching for work instead of
sitting on his bum and giving out advice about other peoples websites when
it is not asked for.

And instead of preaching why don't you Spartanicus go write up a tutorial so
that we can be as "o-god like" as you, or are you too busy sitting behind
your monitor using your hand for other purposes other then typing?

You are also all forgetting the main design principle on the web "design for
as many web browsers as possible" not "design for as many web browsers that
support standards as possible" any decent developer (at least I hope) would
know that the 2 main browsers are Internet Explorer (4, 5 , 5.5, 6) and
Netscape (4,6,7), The rest of the browsers belong to geeks sitting up on
hyped up machines that most peoples computers don't even compare too. Out of
those 2 main browsers IE 5, 6 are the main ones to develop for. The rest are
a minority.

I say that to you Ryan because don't you worry about the tables, only people
who are fanatical about web design or are bored with life look at the source
code of web pages(not to forget search engine bots).

In my years of experience Ryan, the "majority" or people (the people we
design for) not businesses or corporations etc the home users do not upgrade
their browsers because they either don't care, don't have the time, or just
don't have the computer skills. (and yes I know its easy to upgrade a
browser)

Ryan this is my advice to you.

In about another 2-3 years, then start developing in strict pages because
people have old browsers that do not have CSS support.

When the W3C, sits down and does a proper job and has a "final" way to
develop websites no CSS1, 2 3 etc, its just making the job harder you are
better off not to stick to the standards. If they have the responsibility
for standards development they should do it once and make it easy to develop
web pages, and any browser that does not comply with those standards should
be considered a "non compliant" browser, it is a lack of discipline on the
W3C side and browsers development side (e.g. Microsoft and Netscape) for not
being 100% compliant.

We should NOT have to have "work a round's" or know "browser bugs" that is
the reason standards exist, they are there to eliminate those problems, but
they do not.

But that's my point of view.

Abyss
Jul 20 '05 #1
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5 Replies


P: n/a
Abyss wrote:
...
During my research I discovered a bug while trying to use CSS to
layout in a table format.
Just the one?
They did not look the same in both Internet
Explorer 6 and Netscape 7.


Yes - but you said you found a bug?

--
William Tasso
Jul 20 '05 #2

P: n/a
In article <bq**********@au-nws-0001.flow.com.au> in
comp.infosystems.www.authoring.html, Abyss <in**@abyss.ws> wrote:
I have spent the last 45 minutes reading through all the posts, and I
believe that you have all missed the mark of that post.


Which post? You started a new thread, with a new subject line, and
no References. How the heck are we supposed to know what you're on
about, you berk?

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Cortland County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
HTML 4.01 spec: http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/
validator: http://validator.w3.org/
CSS 2 spec: http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-CSS2/
2.1 changes: http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS21/changes.html
validator: http://jigsaw.w3.org/css-validator/
Jul 20 '05 #3

P: n/a
wanting to be a web author ..Chris rodriguez 2003/11/22 4:38pm


Jul 20 '05 #4

P: n/a
On Wed, 3 Dec 2003 09:30:42 +1100, "Abyss" <in**@abyss.ws> wrote:
wanting to be a web author ..Chris rodriguez 2003/11/22 4:38pm


"It's good to want stuff." -- from the film "Welcome Home, Roxy
Carmichael"

"Wanting is the cause of all suffering." -- Buddha

Jul 20 '05 #5

P: n/a
in post <news:70********************************@4ax.com >
William Starr Moake said:
"It's good to want stuff." -- from the film "Welcome Home, Roxy
Carmichael"

"Wanting is the cause of all suffering." -- Buddha


you're not supposed to play with the xmas crackers until xmas day and
don't even think of wearing that stupid bloody paper hat!

--
brucie
03/December/2003 02:20:49 pm kilo
Jul 20 '05 #6

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