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Font size at Wikipedia

P: n/a
If you have a browser that supports user stylesheets (like Firefox),
then you can write

html, body, #globalWrapper { font-size: 100% !important }

into your own stylesheet (e.g. userContent.css) and read
Wikipedia's pages in your *own* font size.

--
In memoriam Alan J. Flavell
http://groups.google.com/groups/sear...Alan.J.Flavell
Jun 27 '08 #1
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15 Replies


P: n/a
Andreas Prilop wrote:
If you have a browser that supports user stylesheets (like Firefox),
then you can write

html, body, #globalWrapper { font-size: 100% !important }

into your own stylesheet (e.g. userContent.css) and read
Wikipedia's pages in your *own* font size.
At least in English Wikipedia, you can also add your own styles to your
account and have them apply from wherever you connect. See

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Skin

On a related note, for handheld users there's a suitable Wikipedia
mirror at http://wapedia.mobi.
Jun 27 '08 #2

P: n/a
In article
<Pi*******************************@s5b004.rrzn.u ni-hannover.de>,
Andreas Prilop <pr********@trashmail.netwrote:
If you have a browser that supports user stylesheets (like Firefox),
then you can write

html, body, #globalWrapper { font-size: 100% !important }

into your own stylesheet (e.g. userContent.css) and read
Wikipedia's pages in your *own* font size.
Thank you for the reminder to do this. Most of the Mac browsers support
this.

--
dorayme
Jun 27 '08 #3

P: n/a
In article <do**********************************@web.aioe.org >,
dorayme <do************@optusnet.com.auwrote:
In article
<Pi*******************************@s5b004.rrzn.u ni-hannover.de>,
Andreas Prilop <pr********@trashmail.netwrote:
If you have a browser that supports user stylesheets (like Firefox),
then you can write

html, body, #globalWrapper { font-size: 100% !important }

into your own stylesheet (e.g. userContent.css) and read
Wikipedia's pages in your *own* font size.

Thank you for the reminder to do this. Most of the Mac browsers support
this.
Where would you put the css file, or does it not matter?
(Also running on Mac...)
Jun 27 '08 #4

P: n/a
On Tue, 22 Apr 2008, David Stone wrote:
Where would you put the css file, or does it not matter?
If you mean Firefox, then search for a file named
userContent-example.css and read it.

--
I used to believe in reincarnation in a former life.
Jun 27 '08 #5

P: n/a
David Stone wrote:
In article <do**********************************@web.aioe.org >,
dorayme <do************@optusnet.com.auwrote:
>In article
<Pi*******************************@s5b004.rrzn.un i-hannover.de>,
Andreas Prilop <pr********@trashmail.netwrote:
>>If you have a browser that supports user stylesheets (like Firefox),
then you can write

html, body, #globalWrapper { font-size: 100% !important }

into your own stylesheet (e.g. userContent.css) and read
Wikipedia's pages in your *own* font size.
Thank you for the reminder to do this. Most of the Mac browsers support
this.

Where would you put the css file, or does it not matter?
(Also running on Mac...)
The userContent.css file should be in the chrome folder in your user
profile.

http://edmullen.net/Mozilla/moz_profile.php

--
Ed Mullen
http://edmullen.net
Those people who think they know everything are a great annoyance to
those of us who do - Isaac Asimov
Jun 27 '08 #6

P: n/a
In article
<Pi*******************************@s5b004.rrzn.u ni-hannover.de>,
Andreas Prilop <pr********@trashmail.netwrote:
On Tue, 22 Apr 2008, David Stone wrote:
Where would you put the css file, or does it not matter?

If you mean Firefox, then search for a file named
userContent-example.css and read it.
Found it. It turns out that putting the suggested 100%
font size on html and body has some interesting side effects
with certain sites. For the international version of the
BBC news site, for example, the result is text that's actually
significantly larger than my default, but slightly smaller
if I choose the UK version. (This appears to be in part
because the international version uses san-serif for the
body text, while the UK uses serif.)

Now I will have to search back through this thread to find
what the alternative, more Wike-specific fix was...
Jun 27 '08 #7

P: n/a
David Stone wrote:
In article
<Pi*******************************@s5b004.rrzn.u ni-hannover.de>,
Andreas Prilop <pr********@trashmail.netwrote:
>On Tue, 22 Apr 2008, David Stone wrote:
>>Where would you put the css file, or does it not matter?
If you mean Firefox, then search for a file named
userContent-example.css and read it.

Found it. It turns out that putting the suggested 100%
font size on html and body has some interesting side effects
with certain sites.
I think you can add domain-specific qualifiers in Mozilla appliation
stylesheets.

@-moz-document domain(wikipedia.org) {
html, body, #globalWrapper { font-size: 100% !important }
}

--
David
Stardate 8308.8
Jun 27 '08 #8

P: n/a
On 2008/04/22 13:39 (GMT-0400) David Stone apparently typed:
Found it. It turns out that putting the suggested 100%
font size on html and body has some interesting side effects
with certain sites.
That behavior is the reason why this particular thread spur began. Read the
table about 2/3 of the way down
http://www.bergamotus.ws/misc/sensib...xt-sizing.html and
http://fm.no-ip.com/SS/Clagnut/bbcnSS.html . 100% in user stylesheet
body,html impacts the same way as minimum font size, usually to a greater
extent, because of a minimum set to a smaller size than the default size.
--
"Either the constitution controls the judges, or the
judges rewrite the constitution." Judge Robert Bork

Team OS/2 ** Reg. Linux User #211409

Felix Miata *** http://fm.no-ip.com/
Jun 27 '08 #9

P: n/a
On 2008/04/22 15:24 (GMT-0400) Felix Miata apparently typed:
That behavior is the reason why this particular thread spur began.
Scratch that. Nothing to do with this thread. Does have to do with the thread
"Using top-level selectors".
--
"Either the constitution controls the judges, or the
judges rewrite the constitution." Judge Robert Bork

Team OS/2 ** Reg. Linux User #211409

Felix Miata *** http://fm.no-ip.com/
Jun 27 '08 #10

P: n/a
In article <no****************************@news1.chem.utoront o.ca>,
David Stone <no******@domain.invalidwrote:
In article <do**********************************@web.aioe.org >,
dorayme <do************@optusnet.com.auwrote:
In article
<Pi*******************************@s5b004.rrzn.u ni-hannover.de>,
Andreas Prilop <pr********@trashmail.netwrote:
If you have a browser that supports user stylesheets (like Firefox),
then you can write
>
html, body, #globalWrapper { font-size: 100% !important }
>
into your own stylesheet (e.g. userContent.css) and read
Wikipedia's pages in your *own* font size.
Thank you for the reminder to do this. Most of the Mac browsers support
this.

Where would you put the css file, or does it not matter?
(Also running on Mac...)
It does not matter where you put it as long as it is on a disk that runs
when your browser runs. In Safari, for example, you can set this up in
preferences and it will ask you where you want to plonk the user
stylesheet and present you with a dialog box and you simply choose where
to save it.

--
dorayme
Jun 27 '08 #11

P: n/a
In article <do**********************************@web.aioe.org >,
dorayme <do************@optusnet.com.auwrote:
In article <no****************************@news1.chem.utoront o.ca>,
David Stone <no******@domain.invalidwrote:
In article <do**********************************@web.aioe.org >,
dorayme <do************@optusnet.com.auwrote:
In article
<Pi*******************************@s5b004.rrzn.u ni-hannover.de>,
Andreas Prilop <pr********@trashmail.netwrote:
>
If you have a browser that supports user stylesheets (like Firefox),
then you can write

html, body, #globalWrapper { font-size: 100% !important }

into your own stylesheet (e.g. userContent.css) and read
Wikipedia's pages in your *own* font size.
>
Thank you for the reminder to do this. Most of the Mac browsers support
this.
Where would you put the css file, or does it not matter?
(Also running on Mac...)

It does not matter where you put it as long as it is on a disk that runs
when your browser runs. In Safari, for example, you can set this up in
preferences and it will ask you where you want to plonk the user
stylesheet and present you with a dialog box and you simply choose where
to save it.
Having read other replies to you, I better say it speaks at least for
Safari and iCab, FF is poor in its help file and poor in its preference
options. Without David Stone's note, you would be hard put to find it!

User/Library/ApplicationSupport/Firefox/Profiles/4su3tfay.default/Chrome/
userContent-example.css indeed!

--
dorayme
Jun 27 '08 #12

P: n/a
In article <48***********************@cv.net>,
David Trimboli <da***@trimboli.namewrote:
David Stone wrote:
In article
<Pi*******************************@s5b004.rrzn.u ni-hannover.de>,
Andreas Prilop <pr********@trashmail.netwrote:
On Tue, 22 Apr 2008, David Stone wrote:

Where would you put the css file, or does it not matter?
If you mean Firefox, then search for a file named
userContent-example.css and read it.
Found it. It turns out that putting the suggested 100%
font size on html and body has some interesting side effects
with certain sites.

I think you can add domain-specific qualifiers in Mozilla appliation
stylesheets.

@-moz-document domain(wikipedia.org) {
html, body, #globalWrapper { font-size: 100% !important }
}
That works very nicely in Firefox - thank you! For the benefit
of anyone else trying this, it appears that you have to restart
Firefox after dropping/removing the userContent.css file into/from
the chrome folder - presumably, it only looks for/parses the file
once at start up.
Jun 27 '08 #13

P: n/a
David Stone wrote:
That works very nicely in Firefox - thank you! For the benefit
of anyone else trying this, it appears that you have to restart
Firefox after dropping/removing the userContent.css file into/from
the chrome folder - presumably, it only looks for/parses the file
once at start up.
If you think about it, it would make sense. A browser caches for a
domain and userContent.css would be applied across domains so it would
be cached once per browsing session, right?

--
Take care,

Jonathan
-------------------
LITTLE WORKS STUDIO
http://www.LittleWorksStudio.com
Jun 27 '08 #14

P: n/a
On Tue, 22 Apr 2008, David Stone wrote:
For the international version of the BBC news site,
URL?
if I choose the UK version.
URL?

Please give always the address (URL) of the site you are
talking about!

I refer to http://www.bbc.co.uk/ and I have now also

#blq-main, #dragHelper { font-size: 100% !important }

--
Solipsists of the world - unite!
Jun 27 '08 #15

P: n/a
In article
<Pi******************************@s5b004.rrzn.un i-hannover.de>,
Andreas Prilop <pr********@trashmail.netwrote:
On Tue, 22 Apr 2008, David Stone wrote:
For the international version of the BBC news site,

URL?
if I choose the UK version.

URL?

Please give always the address (URL) of the site you are
talking about!

I refer to http://www.bbc.co.uk/ and I have now also
This is the URL for both the international and UK versions
of the site. You can switch between versions using a
radio button selector on the page, which toggles the URLs
between
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/......
and
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/......

Having said that, the font differences don't seem to be
as consistent as I first thought - it seems to depend on
which particular part of the site you are looking at
in addition to which edition. Maybe Auntie Beeb is in
the process of updating things, since sometimes I see the
pages with the advertising boxes and sometimes not.
>
#blq-main, #dragHelper { font-size: 100% !important }
Ok, that looks helpful. I noticed when looking at the pages
in Firebug that the Beeb is another site that uses

font-family:verdana;
font-size:62.5%;

in their CSS. Ugh!
Jun 27 '08 #16

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