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How to set default font size to small for a page's body?


I've tried
<body style="font-family:Verdana,Arial,Helvetica;font-size:0.8em;">
or
<body style="font-family:Verdana,Arial,Helvetica;font-size:11pct;">
or
<body style="font-family:Verdana,Arial,Helvetica;font-size:80%;">
to no avail. In IE7 it shows up as Medium. What did I do wrong?

Thanks.
Jun 27 '08
58 5309
David E. Ross wrote:
On 4/19/2008 12:46 PM, Bergamot wrote:
>Don Li wrote:
>>c) provide a font size manipulation javascript function visibly, like
a (small), A (normal, A+ (large) ...
No, please. This is such a wasted effort. All browsers have this ability
built in. If you really think your users are so dumb they don't know how
to do this themselves, then teach them how to adjust their browser
settings. That's something they can use on other sites, not just yours.

I have yet to see one of the stupid custom font control things that even
came close to my preferred text size.

In general, use of a, A, A+ on a Web page gives really bad results for a
browser window that is less than full screen and with 800x600 resolution.

One of the capabilities of SeaMonkey and Firefox (both Mozilla browsers,
based on the Gecko rendering engine) is to add the PrefBar extension.
PrefBar allows the user to setup Font-, Font+, and Font= buttons on a
toolbar outside of the displayed Web page (among many other things); the
Font= button restores the original size in case the user forgets how
many times Font- or Font+ was selected.
So does pressing CTRL+ZERO.

--
Ed Mullen
http://edmullen.net
Still, there is a calm, pure harmony, and music inside of me. - Vincent
Van Gogh
Jun 27 '08 #51
Blinky the Shark wrote:
Bergamot wrote:
>What's your idea of "bigger" type?


XXXXXXX X X X XXXXXXX
X X X X X
X X X X X
X XXXXXXX X XXXXXXX
X X X X X
X X X X X
X X X X XXXXXXX

Or maybe this?

http://edmullen.net/temp/Clibpoard02.jpg

--
Ed Mullen
http://edmullen.net
Animal testing is a bad idea - they get nervous and give the wrong answers.
Jun 27 '08 #52
On 4/19/2008 9:45 PM, Patricia Aldoraz wrote:
On Apr 20, 10:34 am, "David E. Ross" <nob...@nowhere.notwrote:
>In general, use of a, A, A+ on a Web page gives really bad results for a
browser window that is less than full screen and with 800x600 resolution.

Why is it any worse - in general - than a user changing the size of
his text himself? If the method is via PHP to deliver, eg, a bigger
font-size from a stylesheet alternative. In other words, you press A+
and this causes the server to change the applicable css instruction.
I often see the on-page size controls on Web pages of newspapers. When
I try those controls, I find that their CSS is not quite right and that
changing the font sizes makes the CSS errors far more visible. (Yes,
the controls might work through JavaScript; but their effect seems to
change the CSS.) Text in one column often overlaps text in another
column. Images expand unnecessarily. Often, the result is the need to
horizontally (right-left) scroll the page to read. Turning off CSS
(easily done in SeaMonkey) to compensate for these errors often disables
the on-page controls.

I have none of these problems when I use my browser's own size controls.

--
David Ross
<http://www.rossde.com/>

Have you been using Netscape and now feel abandoned by AOL?
Then use SeaMonkey. Go to <http://www.seamonkey-project.org/>.
Jun 27 '08 #53
In article <X5******************************@softcom.net>,
"David E. Ross" <no****@nowhere.notwrote:
On 4/19/2008 9:45 PM, Patricia Aldoraz wrote:
On Apr 20, 10:34 am, "David E. Ross" <nob...@nowhere.notwrote:
In general, use of a, A, A+ on a Web page gives really bad results for a
browser window that is less than full screen and with 800x600 resolution.
Why is it any worse - in general - than a user changing the size of
his text himself? If the method is via PHP to deliver, eg, a bigger
font-size from a stylesheet alternative. In other words, you press A+
and this causes the server to change the applicable css instruction.

I often see the on-page size controls on Web pages of newspapers. When
I try those controls, I find that their CSS is not quite right and that
changing the font sizes makes the CSS errors far more visible.
Allowing a user to choose (via mentioned mechanism) body: 110% instead
of body: 100%; does not entail "the css will not be right". Nor does it
entail "the css is likely not to be right even when implemented by a
competent author" nor does it entail "it is bad practice because it
duplicates a browser function" There is no principle that says that an
author should *never* do this.

--
dorayme
Jun 27 '08 #54
In article <67*************@mid.individual.net>,
Bergamot <be******@visi.comwrote:
Patricia Aldoraz wrote:
On Apr 20, 10:34 am, "David E. Ross" <nob...@nowhere.notwrote:
In general, use of a, A, A+ on a Web page gives really bad results
Why is it any worse - in general - than a user changing the size of
his text himself?

Because *no* web author has *any* clue as to what the user considers
small, medium or large type. The choices provided by such clueless
authors are invariably inadequate for the job.

Patricia, don't get tangled up in the choices for the terms of the
debate foisted on you by others. And don't be fooled by words that load
up the case against with certain assumptions indicated by the free use
of the derogatory "clueless".

Who cares about some "small, medium, and large standard" if what you
want to do it give folk who get a bit tired an easy way to make their
text bigger by a few common sense percent. Who cares if it is not
exactly according to some scale that is supposed to be written in stone.

Last time I looked, I could not see a way of varying to my heart's
content some browsers built in increment text size controls. That does
not make it useless. Quite often, one click makes the difference for me.
So you can assume that one press of an A+ in your envisaged php control
will also work nicely for many people. You can make the A+ to be
equivalent to 1.5 clicks up or 2 clicks up to be sure of *making a
difference* and that will make life easier for some elderly folk. You
are meaning that clicking will take the page to a style sheet which is
different at least in respect to the size of the font? And, as Ben C
points out, this is an opportunity to change anything else that may be
relevant to someone who is clearly not eagle-eyed.

This is not a case of nothing is better than something. Such a control
does not remove the normal browser control, it is an extra.

There is a serious alternative that is sometimes suggested to such
author given text control: show the user how to use the browser
controls. But this has drawbacks of its own. First there are different
types of controls, text size upping and downing v. zooming; different
browsers have different ways. It is not obvious that it would be easier
to get into some educative spiel on this. And, of course, spiels are
often not read!

--
dorayme
Jun 27 '08 #55
Jukka K. Korpela wrote:
>
Almost all resize features I've seen give the choice of (at most) five
sizes, generally corresponding to the five sizes selectable via IE's
font size menu.
I don't recall ever coming across such a site. The more common choices
I've seen are as Mr Shagnasty observed, ranging from something near
xx-small to about medium.
If we added a control that has more options, say 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14,
15, 16 points, then there would be some added value especially to IE
users,
I don't see how. If an IE user needs something other than the 5 standard
choices it provides, don't you think they would have figured out how to
get the default size they really want, and in a way that would work on
more than 1 site?

Your other statements supporting this font sizing idea are a real
stretch, I think.

--
Berg
Jun 27 '08 #56
Ed Mullen wrote:
Blinky the Shark wrote:
>Bergamot wrote:
>>What's your idea of "bigger" type?


XXXXXXX X X X XXXXXXX
X X X X X
X X X X X
X XXXXXXX X XXXXXXX
X X X X X
X X X X X
X X X X XXXXXXX
Or maybe this?

http://edmullen.net/temp/Clibpoard02.jpg
Dingdingdingding! Winner!

--
Blinky
Killing all posts from Google Groups
The Usenet Improvement Project: http://improve-usenet.org
Blinky: http://blinkynet.net

Jun 27 '08 #57
On Thu, 17 Apr 2008, Michael Stemper wrote:
>but it seems they have first set the BODY size to something small
and then the P size to something larger.

I was wondering what it was.
You find it in
http://en.wikipedia.org/skins-1.5/monobook/main.css

body { font: x-small sans-serif; ...
#globalWrapper { font-size: 127%; ...

So just put
#globalWrapper { font-size: 100% !important }
into your userContent.css
:-)

--
In memoriam Alan J. Flavell
http://groups.google.com/groups/sear...Alan.J.Flavell
Jun 27 '08 #58
Scripsit Bergamot:
Jukka K. Korpela wrote:
>>
Almost all resize features I've seen give the choice of (at most)
five sizes, generally corresponding to the five sizes selectable via
IE's font size menu.

I don't recall ever coming across such a site. The more common choices
I've seen are as Mr Shagnasty observed, ranging from something near
xx-small to about medium.
OK, I formulated my thought poorly. I meant that there are typically
just five choices, or some fairly small number of choices, which is as
coarse as the IE menu - and often even _less_ useful, since the sizes
are smaller.
>If we added a control that has more options, say 9, 10, 11, 12, 13,
14, 15, 16 points, then there would be some added value especially
to IE users,

I don't see how.
If you prefer 11 points, for example, this is how you would get it. IE's
menu does not let you choose that "intermediate" size.
If an IE user needs something other than the 5
standard choices it provides, don't you think they would have figured
out how to get the default size they really want, and in a way that
would work on more than 1 site?
No, I don't. Think about a support site for people suffering from rare
diseases. Many of those people might not use the web much if at all,
_except_ for information relevant to the disease. Not being regular
netizens, they might use a computer in a library today, their friend's
computer tomorrow.
Your other statements supporting this font sizing idea are a real
stretch, I think.
It wasn't really my idea. I was actually argumenting against it, when
the above scenario was suggested.

--
Jukka K. Korpela ("Yucca")
http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/

Jun 27 '08 #59

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