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How to wrap text in <p> tag if the text has no spaces and is verylong

P: n/a
How to wrap text in <ptag if the text has no spaces and is very
long? Here is an example:

<p>VeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLon gVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongV eryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVer yVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryV eryLongVeryVeryLong</
p>

The above line is so long that it ought to wrap. But because it has
no spaces, it does not wrap. Instead the entire text is really on one
line. In Dreamweaver they show you the text going on and on to the
right, about 3 screen lengths. But in Firefox, the text past the div
boundary (ie. to the right of the boundry) does not show up.

Strangely, this google editor they also only do text wrapping if the
text has spaces in it. But if no spaces, then you have to scroll to
the right to see all of the <ptag.

BTW, I also tried putting the text into <blockquote>.
Mar 29 '08 #1
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15 Replies


P: n/a
On 2008-03-29, re*************@yahoo.com <re*************@yahoo.comwrote:
How to wrap text in <ptag if the text has no spaces and is very
long? Here is an example:

<p>VeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLo ngVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLong VeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVe ryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVery VeryLongVeryVeryLong</
p>

The above line is so long that it ought to wrap. But because it has
no spaces, it does not wrap. Instead the entire text is really on one
line. In Dreamweaver they show you the text going on and on to the
right, about 3 screen lengths. But in Firefox, the text past the div
boundary (ie. to the right of the boundry) does not show up.
The only way to make it wrap in browsers is to put zero-width breaking
spaces in.

This should work:

VeryVeryLongVery​Longword

Put the ​ characters in wherever you think the browser should
break the text. It doesn't make it break there and then (use <brfor
that), it just creates a breaking opportunity.

An alternative to ​ is the non-standard <wbrelement:

VeryVeryLongVery<wbr>Longword

It's non-standard but some browsers may support <wbrthat don't support
​ I'm not sure.
Mar 29 '08 #2

P: n/a
In article <sl*********************@bowser.marioworld>,
Ben C <sp******@spam.eggswrote:
On 2008-03-29, re*************@yahoo.com <re*************@yahoo.comwrote:
How to wrap text in <ptag if the text has no spaces and is very
long? Here is an example:

<p>VeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLon gVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVe
ryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVery VeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVer
yLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryL ongVeryVeryLong</
p>

The above line is so long that it ought to wrap. But because it has
no spaces, it does not wrap. Instead the entire text is really on one
line. In Dreamweaver they show you the text going on and on to the
right, about 3 screen lengths. But in Firefox, the text past the div
boundary (ie. to the right of the boundry) does not show up.

The only way to make it wrap in browsers is to put zero-width breaking
spaces in.

This should work:

VeryVeryLongVery​Longword

Put the ​ characters in wherever you think the browser should
break the text. It doesn't make it break there and then (use <brfor
that), it just creates a breaking opportunity.

An alternative to ​ is the non-standard <wbrelement:

VeryVeryLongVery<wbr>Longword

It's non-standard but some browsers may support <wbrthat don't support
​ I'm not sure.
There is a table of what browsers do with wbr, ​, and ­ at:
<http://www.quirksmode.org/oddsandends/wbr.html>

--
dorayme
Mar 29 '08 #3

P: n/a
Scripsit Ben C:
>><p>VeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryL ongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLon gVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongV eryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVer yVeryLongVeryVeryLong</
p>
This first question is: why would anyone write such a monstrosity? The
second question is: if you would like it to be broken by a browser,
should the browser read your mind to decide whether it should hyphenate
or just break it?
The only way to make it wrap in browsers is to put zero-width breaking
spaces in.
No it isn't, as you describe later. Besides, it is up to browsers to
decide whether they automatically hyphenate words. Currently they have
decided not to. There is nothing in CSS as currently defined to suggest
either hyphenation or breaking strings without hyphenation-
This should work:

VeryVeryLongVery​Longword
Should it? By which specification? Beware that HTML specifications do
not require Unicode conformance or support to particular Unicode
characters.
It's non-standard but some browsers may support <wbrthat don't
support ​ I'm not sure.
I am. The <wbrmarkup is far better supported and it is not know to
cause any trouble, unlike ​ which may in fact be rendered using a
glyph for unsupported characters.

More info: http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/html/nobr.html#suggest

--
Jukka K. Korpela ("Yucca")
http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/

Mar 30 '08 #4

P: n/a
On 2008-03-30, Jukka K. Korpela <jk******@cs.tut.fiwrote:
Scripsit Ben C:
>>><p>VeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVery LongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLo ngVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLong VeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVe ryVeryLongVeryVeryLong</
p>

This first question is: why would anyone write such a monstrosity?
Often because it's a URL generated by something like a content
management system that requires at least one unique URL for each atom in
the universe.
The second question is: if you would like it to be broken by a
browser, should the browser read your mind to decide whether it should
hyphenate or just break it?
>The only way to make it wrap in browsers is to put zero-width breaking
spaces in.

No it isn't, as you describe later. Besides, it is up to browsers to
decide whether they automatically hyphenate words. Currently they have
decided not to. There is nothing in CSS as currently defined to
suggest either hyphenation or breaking strings without hyphenation-
Well, in the sense that CSS doesn't define exactly what a "line-breaking
opportunity" is. But it does imply that browsers should only ever break
lines at line-breaking opportunities, and that what counts as a
line-breaking opportunity doesn't change just because there is less
space available.

In fact Unicode specifications do define a lot of stuff about line
breaking and most browsers either implement that or a simplification of
it although as we know they aren't required to.
>This should work:

VeryVeryLongVery​Longword

Should it? By which specification? Beware that HTML specifications do
not require Unicode conformance or support to particular Unicode
characters.
I did know that, since you have pointed it out previously. I just meant
"should work" in the sense of "probably will".
Mar 30 '08 #5

P: n/a
On 03/29/08 03:45 pm, re*************@yahoo.com wrote:
How to wrap text in <ptag if the text has no spaces and is very
long? Here is an example:

<p>VeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLon gVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongV eryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVer yVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryVeryLongVeryV eryLongVeryVeryLong</p>

The above line is so long that it ought to wrap. But because it has
no spaces, it does not wrap. [...]
Why would it wrap? There are no spaces. Who cares what an editor does?
Perhaps if you gave some context for such a ridiculously long line, we
could offer a sensible solution.

--
jmm (hyphen) list (at) sohnen-moe (dot) com
(Remove .AXSPAMGN for email)
Apr 4 '08 #6

P: n/a
On Apr 4, 10:50 am, Jim Moe <jmm-list.AXSPA...@sohnen-moe.comwrote:
On 03/29/08 03:45 pm,removeps-gro...@yahoo.com wrote:How to wrap text in <ptag if the text has no spaces and is very
The above line is so long that it ought to wrap. But because it has
no spaces, it does not wrap. [...]

Why would it wrap? There are no spaces. Who cares what an editor does?
Perhaps if you gave some context for such a ridiculously long line, we
could offer a sensible solution.
I'm writing a 404 error page in JSP that says we could not find the
URL you entered. It writes out the URL, and unfortunately the URL is
longer than the screenwidth and is clipped off.
Apr 6 '08 #7

P: n/a
On 04/05/08 10:30 pm, re*************@yahoo.com wrote:
>
The above line is so long that it ought to wrap. But because it has
no spaces, it does not wrap. [...]

Why would it wrap? There are no spaces. Who cares what an editor does?
Perhaps if you gave some context for such a ridiculously long line, we
could offer a sensible solution.

I'm writing a 404 error page in JSP that says we could not find the
URL you entered. It writes out the URL, and unfortunately the URL is
longer than the screenwidth and is clipped off.
Then technically it does not matter whether the URL is valid as displayed.
Use a server-side routine to arbitrarily wrap the text however you want
it. You could even mention that the bogus URL was wrapped to increase the
confusion of the 404 recipient.

--
jmm (hyphen) list (at) sohnen-moe (dot) com
(Remove .AXSPAMGN for email)
Apr 6 '08 #8

P: n/a
Scripsit re*************@yahoo.com:
On Apr 6, 6:27 am, "Jukka K. Korpela" <jkorp...@cs.tut.fiwrote:
>Well, why didn't you tell that in your first posting, and why do you
_still_ fail to try to find the right group? CSS has nothing to offer
you but overflow handling.

Sorry, maybe I should have said this in the first post.
There's really no "maybe" in either of my statements.
However, the
problem (of having enormously long words) could occur in other
contexts.
Who cares? Different situations call for different solutions.
Many editors like VI and MSWord do wrap words longer than
one line,
Maybe. That has little if anything to do with CSS.
so I thought CSS might have a property you can set on a div
to enable this. Maybe they should add a a property "wrapAt" whose
default value is "space" but can be "all".
"Maybe" the situation is far more complicated.

IE recognizes a nonstandard CSS property that effectively allows any
breaks. It's not useful, because you seldom want to make all breaks
allowed and because other browsers won't recognize the property.
Right now it's as if there
is a <wbrafter every space,
No, it's more complicated. But why do you care? URLs are not allowed to
contain whitespace.
But you give me an idea -- maybe I can use "overflow:scroll".
"Maybe" it's a _bad_ idea. I mentioned the CSS feature to emphasize how
far from your problem CSS currently is.
>And why would the URL matter? It's available in the address bar
anyway.

No, the address bar will show "http://www.mywebsite.com/errors/
404.jsp",
That's absurd, even if you really own the mywebsite.com domain (which
actually exists).

The address bar should show the URL requested by the client. Don't mess
around with it. It's absurd to break something and then try to construct
a plastic imitation, running into endless trouble.

To be honest, my 404 error page echoes the URL, and I don't really care
if it does not fit into the available width. The user may have to
scroll, but why would I set up some _separate_ scrolling mechanism with
overflow: scroll (or overflow: auto, which makes much more sense)?

--
Jukka K. Korpela ("Yucca")
http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/

Apr 6 '08 #9

P: n/a
re*************@yahoo.com wrote:
On Apr 4, 10:50 am, Jim Moe <jmm-list.AXSPA...@sohnen-moe.comwrote:
>On 03/29/08 03:45 pm,removeps-gro...@yahoo.com wrote:How to wrap
text in <ptag if the text has no spaces and is very
>>The above line is so long that it ought to wrap. But because it has
no spaces, it does not wrap. [...]

Why would it wrap? There are no spaces. Who cares what an editor
does? Perhaps if you gave some context for such a ridiculously
long line, we could offer a sensible solution.

I'm writing a 404 error page in JSP that says we could not find the
URL you entered. It writes out the URL, and unfortunately the URL is
longer than the screenwidth and is clipped off.
Well, you use script to generate it so you can use some like this
(betwenn <nobrand </nobrit is single line)

<nobr>http://domain.com/<wbr>some_very_large_<wbr>text_here/<wbr>and_some_other_<wbr>here</nobr>

--
Petr Vileta, Czech republic
(My server rejects all messages from Yahoo and Hotmail. Send me your
mail from another non-spammer site please.)

Please reply to <petr AT practisoft DOT cz>

Apr 8 '08 #10

P: n/a
On Wed, 9 Apr 2008, Jukka K. Korpela wrote:
(And applying them indiscriminately leads to poor results,
like breaking after "-" even in a context like
"the temperature is -8 degrees".)
If you did not use a minus sign U+2212 here, you deserve it
to be punished.

--
In memoriam Alan J. Flavell
http://groups.google.com/groups/sear...Alan.J.Flavell
Apr 11 '08 #11

P: n/a
Scripsit Andreas Prilop:
On Wed, 9 Apr 2008, Jukka K. Korpela wrote:
>(And applying them indiscriminately leads to poor results,
like breaking after "-" even in a context like
"the temperature is -8 degrees".)

If you did not use a minus sign U+2212 here, you deserve it
to be punished.
Much more than half of the world uses hyphen-minus in the function of
minus sign, so the browser behavior is wrong for this reason, too.
Moreover, the breaking problem also applies to things like "The constant
EOF is defined as (-1)", where it would be quite inappropriate to use a
minus sign, even though the expression refers to a negative number.

--
Jukka K. Korpela ("Yucca")
http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/

Apr 11 '08 #12

P: n/a
On 2008-04-03, Jukka K. Korpela <jk******@cs.tut.fiwrote:
Scripsit Ben C:
[...]
>In fact Unicode specifications do define a lot of stuff about line
breaking

Quite a lot indeed, with many oddities.
>and most browsers either implement that or a simplification
of it although as we know they aren't required to.

I don't think any browser even tries to get close to implementing
Unicode line breaking rules or even a simplification of them.
If you're writing a browser that has to display text in a variety of
different scripts used for languages you aren't familiar with yourself,
it's much easier to load in the Unicode breaking class tables and use
the Unicode specification than it is to learn all those scripts and
their different conventions.
Jun 27 '08 #13

P: n/a
Scripsit Ben C:
>I don't think any browser even tries to get close to implementing
Unicode line breaking rules or even a simplification of them.

If you're writing a browser that has to display text in a variety of
different scripts used for languages you aren't familiar with
yourself, it's much easier to load in the Unicode breaking class
tables and use the Unicode specification than it is to learn all
those scripts and their different conventions.
Quite right, so it's somewhat surprising that browsers don't do that.

One reason to this might be that Unicode line breaking rules haven't
been stable. Moreover, they are fairly complex. (And applying them
indiscriminately leads to poor results, like breaking after "-" even in
a context like "the temperature is -8 degrees".)

--
Jukka K. Korpela ("Yucca")
http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/

Jun 27 '08 #14

P: n/a
On Wed, 9 Apr 2008, Jukka K. Korpela wrote:
(And applying them indiscriminately leads to poor results,
like breaking after "-" even in a context like
"the temperature is -8 degrees".)
If you did not use a minus sign U+2212 here, you deserve it
to be punished.

--
In memoriam Alan J. Flavell
http://groups.google.com/groups/sear...Alan.J.Flavell
Jun 27 '08 #15

P: n/a
Scripsit Andreas Prilop:
On Wed, 9 Apr 2008, Jukka K. Korpela wrote:
>(And applying them indiscriminately leads to poor results,
like breaking after "-" even in a context like
"the temperature is -8 degrees".)

If you did not use a minus sign U+2212 here, you deserve it
to be punished.
Much more than half of the world uses hyphen-minus in the function of
minus sign, so the browser behavior is wrong for this reason, too.
Moreover, the breaking problem also applies to things like "The constant
EOF is defined as (-1)", where it would be quite inappropriate to use a
minus sign, even though the expression refers to a negative number.

--
Jukka K. Korpela ("Yucca")
http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/

Jun 27 '08 #16

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