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One stylesheet for different sites

Hello,

I use the same stylesheet for all the sites I manage (3 today, 4 as of
next Monday). When I change one sheet I simply copy it to the other
sites to keep everything in synch. Works beautifully so far. Trouble
is, it's a manual process that eventually will break down because of
human error. In other words, there's going to come a time when I'm
tired or distracted and make a change to the sheet on site A and
propagate that to C, D and E. This leaves site B with the old sheet.
If I then make a change to the B sheet and propagate that to all the
other sites, the changes originally made will be lost. What's the
answer? A batch file? A database maybe, or is that overkill? If anyone
else has struggled with this problem, or anticipates facing it, I
would like to hear their ideas.

Cheers

Nov 1 '07 #1
3 1346
On Thu, 1 Nov 2007, whitesmith wrote:
I use the same stylesheet for all the sites I manage (3 today, 4 as of
next Monday). When I change one sheet I simply copy it to the other
sites to keep everything in synch.
Just write, say,
<link href="http://www.w3.org/StyleSheets/home.css" ...
into all pages. The stylesheet may be on any other server.

--
In memoriam Alan J. Flavell
http://groups.google.com/groups/sear...Alan.J.Flavell
Nov 1 '07 #2
On Thu, 01 Nov 2007 15:07:50 +0100, whitesmith <ap*******@hushmail.com>
wrote:
Hello,

I use the same stylesheet for all the sites I manage (3 today, 4 as of
next Monday). When I change one sheet I simply copy it to the other
sites to keep everything in synch. Works beautifully so far. Trouble
is, it's a manual process that eventually will break down because of
human error. In other words, there's going to come a time when I'm
tired or distracted and make a change to the sheet on site A and
propagate that to C, D and E. This leaves site B with the old sheet.
If I then make a change to the B sheet and propagate that to all the
other sites, the changes originally made will be lost. What's the
answer? A batch file? A database maybe, or is that overkill? If anyone
else has struggled with this problem, or anticipates facing it, I
would like to hear their ideas.
I haven't checked it, but I'd think you can specify an external stylesheet
without any problems, so just one stylesheet online would do it.

Normally these kinds of file edits/updates are taken care off by systems
like CVS or Subversion (SVN). Edits/changes are commited to a repository,
one can easily update existing code with a single statement, you are
warned when a commit causes a conflict, and retrieving earlier versions of
the code is easy as pie.
--
Rik Wasmus
Nov 1 '07 #3
On Nov 1, 10:10 am, "Rik Wasmus" <luiheidsgoe...@hotmail.comwrote:
On Thu, 01 Nov 2007 15:07:50 +0100, whitesmith <apasse...@hushmail.com>
wrote:
Hello,
I use the same stylesheet for all the sites I manage (3 today, 4 as of
next Monday). When I change one sheet I simply copy it to the other
sites to keep everything in synch. Works beautifully so far. Trouble
is, it's a manual process that eventually will break down because of
human error. In other words, there's going to come a time when I'm
tired or distracted and make a change to the sheet on site A and
propagate that to C, D and E. This leaves site B with the old sheet.
If I then make a change to the B sheet and propagate that to all the
other sites, the changes originally made will be lost. What's the
answer? A batch file? A database maybe, or is that overkill? If anyone
else has struggled with this problem, or anticipates facing it, I
would like to hear their ideas.

I haven't checked it, but I'd think you can specify an external stylesheet
without any problems, so just one stylesheet online would do it.

Normally these kinds of file edits/updates are taken care off by systems
like CVS or Subversion (SVN). Edits/changes are commited to a repository,
one can easily update existing code with a single statement, you are
warned when a commit causes a conflict, and retrieving earlier versions of
the code is easy as pie.
--
Rik Wasmus
My thanks to Rik and Andreas for taking time to reply. I'll give both
approaches a try and see what happens.

Nov 2 '07 #4

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