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Poll: Is a calendar tabular?

Is a calendar tabular data, logically meriting table markup?

--
Lars Eighner <http://larseighner.com/ <http://myspace.com/larseighner>
Countdown: 465 days to go.
What do you do when you're debranded?
Oct 12 '07 #1
5 2213
On 2007-10-12, Lars Eighner <us****@larseighner.comwrote:
Is a calendar tabular data, logically meriting table markup?
Yes. In a calendar like this:

October 2007
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31

Each row is a week and each column is a day. The point of a calendar
like that is so you can look up what day of the week the 27th is, or
what date it will be next Wednesday.

Others have quibbled in the past that being a visual representation of a
two-dimensional function domain is not a necessary condition of
tabularity. But it's surely a sufficient one.
Oct 12 '07 #2
On 10/12/2007 9:51 AM, Lars Eighner wrote:
Is a calendar tabular data, logically meriting table markup?
The day of the weeks are columns; you can even markup the row with the
day-names as <th</thinstead of <td</td>. The weeks are rows. The
month-name belongs in <caption</caption>. It sure seems to be a table.

--
David E. Ross
<http://www.rossde.com/>

Natural foods can be harmful: Look at all the
people who die of natural causes.
Oct 12 '07 #3
Lars Eighner wrote:
Is a calendar tabular data, logically meriting table markup?
Yes. It represents a two-dimensional conceptual mapping: week versus
day-of-week. Calendars don't usually have an explicit column identifying
the week, but some, used for formal planning or financial purposes,
display a week number in a column to the left of the first day of the
week (Sunday in the US, Monday in many or most other places). In this
respect, it's as much a table as a presentation of sales figures with
one row for each fiscal year and one column for each of the four
quarters of the year.

The markup is as useful as for a typical data table. It's common for
someone to scan events scheduled for successive Saturdays.
Oct 12 '07 #4
On Oct 12, 12:51 pm, Lars Eighner <use...@larseighner.comwrote:
Is a calendar tabular data, logically meriting table markup?

--
Lars Eighner <http://larseighner.com/ <http://myspace.com/larseighner>
Countdown: 465 days to go.
What do you do when you're debranded?

In terms of presentation, probably.

In terms of data, no.

Think about it. If you were setting up a calendar in a database, which
has tables composed of rows and columns, you would set it up in the
usual tabular format we are used to seeing. Instead, you would
probably have rows corrosponding to events and columns corresponding
to event details, which would include items like year, month, day,
date, hour, and so on. In fact, you would likely use your databases
date-time datatype.

Don't confuse display with the underlying data.

CC

Oct 13 '07 #5
On 2007-10-13, ca******@gmail.com <ca******@gmail.comwrote:
On Oct 12, 12:51 pm, Lars Eighner <use...@larseighner.comwrote:
>Is a calendar tabular data, logically meriting table markup?

--
Lars Eighner <http://larseighner.com/ <http://myspace.com/larseighner>
Countdown: 465 days to go.
What do you do when you're debranded?


In terms of presentation, probably.

In terms of data, no.

Think about it. If you were setting up a calendar in a database, which
has tables composed of rows and columns, you would set it up in the
usual tabular format we are used to seeing. Instead, you would
probably have rows corrosponding to events and columns corresponding
to event details, which would include items like year, month, day,
date, hour, and so on. In fact, you would likely use your databases
date-time datatype.

Don't confuse display with the underlying data.
The point is that a table _is_ a way of displaying things. There isn't
really any such thing as an abstract table.

The real distinction is between using a table to represent some
meaningful relationship between things (which is considered OK) and just
using one to position things on the screen aesthetically (which is
considered improper on slow Friday afternoons).

\From the former you can work back to the artificial concept of "tabular
data"-- the data are tabular if there's some useful purpose to
displaying them in a table. It doesn't have to be the _only_ way to
display them or to represent them in a database.
Oct 13 '07 #6

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