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Select on input type

Is it possible to craft a selector that selects on input type?

It would be useful to be able to distinguish between type="text" and
type="checkbox".

Sep 19 '07 #1
5 4184
Hans Malherbe schrieb:
Is it possible to craft a selector that selects on input type?

It would be useful to be able to distinguish between type="text" and
type="checkbox".
Look up the various attribute selectors in CSS 2.x.
--
Johannes Koch
In te domine speravi; non confundar in aeternum.
(Te Deum, 4th cent.)
Sep 19 '07 #2
Scripsit Johannes Koch:
Hans Malherbe schrieb:
>Is it possible to craft a selector that selects on input type?

It would be useful to be able to distinguish between type="text" and
type="checkbox".

Look up the various attribute selectors in CSS 2.x.
And beware of the Drag... I mean Internet Explorer 6 and older. IE 6 is
still the most commonly used browser, and it does not understand attribute
selectors. (Also note that CSS 2.1 is a draft that says that it may change
at any moment with no warning, and CSS 2.0 as such has in effect been
rejected both by the W3C and browser vendors, and there is no other CSS 2.x.
Good luck. :-( )

The practical solution, thus, as mentioned about monthly in this group, is
to use a clumsier approach that uses selectors that even IE 6 understands.
Class selectors are the simple way, but often you don't need to add a class
attribute into _each_ <inputelement. For example, if you group checkboxes
into fieldsets so that they only appear inside <fieldsetelements that
contain no other input elements, you can use e.g.
<fieldset class="checkboxes"...
and the selector
.checkboxes input

Or if your form has 42 input fields, 41 of them with type="text" (expressed
or implied) and one with type="submit" and you want to make the font in text
input fields monospace (great idea - simple, but few people have found it),
you can use just <input type="submit" class="submit" ...and

input { font-family: Consolas, Courier New, monospace; }
input.submit { font-family: sans-serif; }

That is, you set the property for the element in general, then override it
for those cases where you don't want it.

--
Jukka K. Korpela ("Yucca")
http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/

Sep 19 '07 #3
Jukka K. Korpela wrote:
>
Also note that CSS 2.1 is a draft that says that it may change
at any moment with no warning
You often mention this, but realistically what are the chances that it
*will* change? Pretty close to zero, don't you think?

--
Berg
Sep 19 '07 #4
Bergamot wrote:
Jukka K. Korpela wrote:
>Also note that CSS 2.1 is a draft that says that it may change
at any moment with no warning

You often mention this, but realistically what are the chances that it
*will* change? Pretty close to zero, don't you think?
From the CSS working group's own words (7/20/07):
The CSS WG published the new Candidate Recommendation (CR) for CSS level
2 revision 1, with the firm intention that there won't be any more
working drafts.

From CSS 2.1 CR draft:
Features at Risk:
New 'list-style-type' values:
'armenian'
'georgian'
'lower-greek'
Multiple ID attributes for ID selector
Automatic table layout algorithm
Quotes
BODY element in XHTML (transfer special case in HTML to XHTML)

I'd give the chance of the relevant part of the draft -- attribute in
CSS selector, which is actually CSS 2, of being changed somewhere
between the inverse Ackermann function of one over Grahm's number and zero.

--
Beware of bugs in the above code; I have only proved it correct, not
tried it. -- Donald E. Knuth
Sep 19 '07 #5
Scripsit Bergamot:
Jukka K. Korpela wrote:
>>
Also note that CSS 2.1 is a draft that says that it may change
at any moment with no warning

You often mention this, but realistically what are the chances that it
*will* change? Pretty close to zero, don't you think?
It depends. Is 0.42 close to zero?

The CSS 2.1 drafts have a sad history of slow progress and odd changes, and
there was already a move back (downwards) in the "standardization" path.

--
Jukka K. Korpela ("Yucca")
http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/

Sep 20 '07 #6

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