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Page lifespan?

I found some details on a musical festival, made my plans, and only found
out by chance that the site was two years out of date.

Is there some HTML way of setting a lifespan on a webpage on creation so
that, should the creator neglect to remove it, browsers will not render it?

If not should such a mechanism exist?
Perhaps with page expired message?

David F. Cox
Sep 1 '07 #1
3 1998
rf

"David Cox" <no****@nospam.comwrote in message
news:65*******************@newsfe6-win.ntli.net...
>I found some details on a musical festival, made my plans, and only found
out by chance that the site was two years out of date.
Woodstock?
Is there some HTML way of setting a lifespan on a webpage on creation so
that, should the creator neglect to remove it, browsers will not render
it?
No.
If not should such a mechanism exist?
Perhaps with page expired message?
Yes. The author should heep the web page up to date. Then again some web
pages last a very very long time. The HTML specs for instance.

--
Richard.
Sep 1 '07 #2
On 9/1/2007 4:32 AM, David Cox wrote:
I found some details on a musical festival, made my plans, and only found
out by chance that the site was two years out of date.

Is there some HTML way of setting a lifespan on a webpage on creation so
that, should the creator neglect to remove it, browsers will not render it?

If not should such a mechanism exist?
Perhaps with page expired message?

David F. Cox

Per RFC 2616, it is possible to set an expiration date for a page. This
can be done via
<META HTTP-EQUIV="expires" CONTENT="Wed, 26 Feb 2008 08:21:57 GMT">

However, that has no real effect on the existence of the page. It only
affects caching.

--

David E. Ross
<http://www.rossde.com/>.

The only reason we have so many laws is that not enough people will do
the right thing. (© 1997)
Sep 1 '07 #3

"David E. Ross" <no****@nowhere.notwrote in message
news:B_******************************@softcom.net. ..
On 9/1/2007 4:32 AM, David Cox wrote:
>I found some details on a musical festival, made my plans, and only found
out by chance that the site was two years out of date.

Is there some HTML way of setting a lifespan on a webpage on creation so
that, should the creator neglect to remove it, browsers will not render
it?

If not should such a mechanism exist?
Perhaps with page expired message?

David F. Cox


Per RFC 2616, it is possible to set an expiration date for a page. This
can be done via
<META HTTP-EQUIV="expires" CONTENT="Wed, 26 Feb 2008 08:21:57 GMT">

However, that has no real effect on the existence of the page. It only
affects caching.

--

David E. Ross
<http://www.rossde.com/>.

The only reason we have so many laws is that not enough people will do
the right thing. (© 1997)
I might have guessed that the situation would be worse than I had feared. We
have an "expires" provision, but the neither the page or some of its content
expires.

David Cox
Sep 2 '07 #4

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