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Any thoughts on the use of web-smart colors

In my research to reeducate myself on color, I have come across a new
(to me) concept of "web smart" color. Basically it restricts r,g and b
to 16 values for a net of 4096 colors. I guess it's the new and
improved version of the 216 web safe colors.

Any thoughts on the use of web-smart colors? Pros? Cons?
Aug 16 '07 #1
4 2268
William Gill <no*****@example.invalidwrites:
In my research to reeducate myself on color, I have come across a new
(to me) concept of "web smart" color. Basically it restricts r,g and
b to 16 values for a net of 4096 colors. I guess it's the new and
improved version of the 216 web safe colors.

Any thoughts on the use of web-smart colors? Pros? Cons?
Advantages:
- shorthand typing in CSS (#abc; rather than #aabbcc;)
- given the range of display devices and variations between monitors,
the difference between #abc; and #a9bdc6; is going to be lost on
99.9% of your users unless you actually put those two colours adjacent.

Disadvantages:
- If you need to match up with an image (e.g. a logo, or a gradient
graphic), you'll usually need all 24 bits.
- Someone's given them a (new to me, too) silly name

--
Chris
Aug 16 '07 #2
- shorthand typing in CSS (#abc; rather than #aabbcc;)
Even with my typing , that's not much of a savings, but it may make
keeping track easier.
- If you need to match up with an image (e.g. a logo, or a gradient
graphic), you'll usually need all 24 bits.
I had thought about that, but in cases where I will need to have, say a
background color "extend" the image, I can revert to "Truecolor."
Otherwise, I'm pretty sure I can find suitable "harmony" from the
reduced palette.
Aug 16 '07 #3
Rik
On Thu, 16 Aug 2007 17:42:35 +0200, William Gill <no*****@example.invalid>
wrote:
> - If you need to match up with an image (e.g. a logo, or a gradient
graphic), you'll usually need all 24 bits.
I had thought about that, but in cases where I will need to have, say a
background color "extend" the image, I can revert to "Truecolor."
Otherwise, I'm pretty sure I can find suitable "harmony" from the
reduced palette.
Yup, IMHO, if it cannot be matched exactly some extra contrast would be
required. 'not really the same' is often more ugly then 'clearly not the
same'.
--
Rik Wasmus
Aug 16 '07 #4
Yup, IMHO, if it cannot be matched exactly some extra contrast would be
required. 'not really the same' is often more ugly then 'clearly not the
same'.
I agree. If you can't match, make obvious you didn't try.
Aug 16 '07 #5

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