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Best practices?

P: n/a
I am just getting back into web design after a couple of years focusing on
other things so I need to get an idea of the "best practices" have emerged
in the last few years among professional web designers.

I'm especially interested in knowing:
1) what browsers are typically being supported these days (e.g. IE 5 and up,
Firefox 2.0 and up)
2) what standards are being observed with regards to HTML level. For
example, when I last did a professional page, I wrote to HTML 4.01
transitional and CSS 2.0. Are those still good choices or should I be
writing to other standards?

--
Rhino
Apr 21 '07 #1
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5 Replies


P: n/a
Sat, 21 Apr 2007 09:25:34 -0400 from rhino
<No***********************@anonymous.com>:
1) what browsers are typically being supported these days (e.g. IE 5 and up,
Firefox 2.0 and up)
I don't understand the question. It's not the job of the Web author
to "support" browsers.
2) what standards are being observed with regards to HTML level. For
example, when I last did a professional page, I wrote to HTML 4.01
transitional and CSS 2.0. Are those still good choices or should I be
writing to other standards?
Congratulations -- those are still good choices.

By the way, I'm sure the domain owners of anonymous.com are grateful
for the extra spam they'll get as a result of your choice of fake
address.

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
HTML 4.01 spec: http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/
validator: http://validator.w3.org/
CSS 2.1 spec: http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS21/
validator: http://jigsaw.w3.org/css-validator/
Why We Won't Help You:
http://diveintomark.org/archives/200..._wont_help_you
Apr 21 '07 #2

P: n/a
rhino wrote:
>
1) what browsers are typically being supported these days
All of them. Don't focus on targeting specific browsers. Write to
standards (which you are already aware of) and you'll be more likely to
"work" in the widest range of browsing environments.
(e.g. IE 5 and up, Firefox 2.0 and up)
Writing to standards doesn't mean you don't need to test in different
browsers, of course. IE 6 and 7 in particular due to their buggy
behaviors. The number of IE 5/5.5 users has shrunk to tiny levels for
most sites, but it is still be worth checking that your pages are at
least usable in those. Just don't get hung up on their aesthetics.

For non-IE browsers, some variation of gecko (Firefox, Seamonkey,
Netscape 7+), some variation of KHTML (Safari, Konqueror) and the latest
Opera are all worth having around, but the differences between these are
usually insignificant unless you're doing more advanced layouts. KISS is
always advisable. A text browser like Lynx is also good to have around.
2) what standards are being observed with regards to HTML level. For
example, when I last did a professional page, I wrote to HTML 4.01
transitional and CSS 2.0.
For new pages, stick with HTML 4.01 Strict, not Transitional. CSS 2.1 is
well supported by the current population of "modern" browsers. Just be
aware that not all browsers support all CSS properties or values, and of
course browser bugs especially in IE.
http://www.positioniseverything.net/explorer.html

--
Berg
Apr 21 '07 #3

P: n/a
Sat, 21 Apr 2007 11:01:27 -0400 from Stan Brown
<th************@fastmail.fm>:
Sat, 21 Apr 2007 09:25:34 -0400 from rhino
<No***********************@anonymous.com>:
2) what standards are being observed with regards to HTML level. For
example, when I last did a professional page, I wrote to HTML 4.01
transitional and CSS 2.0. Are those still good choices or should I be
writing to other standards?

Congratulations -- those are still good choices.
OOPS -- I meant to say that HTML 4.01 is a good choice, but Strict
rather than Traditional. (I realized my mistake when I saw Bergamot's
article.)

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
HTML 4.01 spec: http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/
validator: http://validator.w3.org/
CSS 2.1 spec: http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS21/
validator: http://jigsaw.w3.org/css-validator/
Why We Won't Help You:
http://diveintomark.org/archives/200..._wont_help_you
Apr 21 '07 #4

P: n/a
Scripsit Bergamot:
For new pages, stick with HTML 4.01 Strict, not Transitional. CSS 2.1
is well supported by the current population of "modern" browsers.
Just be aware that not all browsers support all CSS properties or
values, and of course browser bugs especially in IE.
http://www.positioniseverything.net/explorer.html
There's more than just bugs in IE: many important CSS 2.1 features haven't
been implemented even on IE 7, and there are many more holes in IE 6. I
wouldn't take additional lack of CSS support on pre-6 versions very
seriously, since their use is pretty small by now. _Bugs_ are a different
matter: some IE 5 bugs might be serious enough to require some attention.

Lack of support to some CSS features, like generated content in IE 7, is not
very serious, since robust authoring takes them into account anyway: CSS can
be off or overridden. Bugs are a more serious issue.

--
Jukka K. Korpela ("Yucca")
http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/

Apr 21 '07 #5

P: n/a
rhino wrote :
I am just getting back into web design after a couple of years focusing on
other things so I need to get an idea of the "best practices" have emerged
in the last few years among professional web designers.

I'm especially interested in knowing:
1) what browsers are typically being supported these days (e.g. IE 5 and up,
Firefox 2.0 and up)
2) what standards are being observed with regards to HTML level. For
example, when I last did a professional page, I wrote to HTML 4.01
transitional and CSS 2.0. Are those still good choices or should I be
writing to other standards?
Writing with a strict DTD is preferable, ensuring a clear separation
between content and presentation.
Also, CSS 2.1 is the norm now. More in the provided url in my signature.

Gérard
--
Using Web Standards in your Web Pages (Updated Dec. 2006)
http://developer.mozilla.org/en/docs...your_Web_Pages
Apr 21 '07 #6

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