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Is it true that screen readers will ignore display: none;?

P: n/a
Hi,

I ocasionally use display: none; to hide divs that, on the click of a
link they will reappear. For example, maybe I create a menu and when
you click a link of menu options the submenu options appear.

Anyway, is it true that screen readers for visually impaired users
mostly ignore elements that are hidden this way? Is it better to use
position: absolute; and set it off the screen? Just a bit concerned
because a few of my projects work this way.

Cheers

Burnsy

Mar 9 '07 #1
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7 Replies


P: n/a
bi******@yahoo.co.uk wrote:
>
Anyway, is it true that screen readers for visually impaired users
mostly ignore elements that are hidden this way?
I'd hesitate to say "mostly". The most used readers mostly read what's
on screen. If you hide it with display:none or visibility:hidden, they
don't "see" it either. For your perusal:
http://www.access-matters.com/screen...-test-results/
Is it better to use
position: absolute; and set it off the screen?
That depends on what is being hidden. A URL would help.

--
Berg
Mar 9 '07 #2

P: n/a
Bergamot <be******@visi.comwrites:
bi******@yahoo.co.uk wrote:
>>
Anyway, is it true that screen readers for visually impaired users
mostly ignore elements that are hidden this way?

I'd hesitate to say "mostly". The most used readers mostly read what's
on screen. If you hide it with display:none or visibility:hidden, they
don't "see" it either. For your perusal:
http://www.access-matters.com/screen...-test-results/
Do the most-used speech readers pay any attention to media-specific
stylesheets?

sherm--

--
Web Hosting by West Virginians, for West Virginians: http://wv-www.net
Cocoa programming in Perl: http://camelbones.sourceforge.net
Mar 9 '07 #3

P: n/a
Sherm Pendley schrieb:
Do the most-used speech readers pay any attention to media-specific
stylesheets?
Recent versions of JAWS recognise the "aural" media type.
--
Johannes Koch
In te domine speravi; non confundar in aeternum.
(Te Deum, 4th cent.)
Mar 9 '07 #4

P: n/a
Scripsit Johannes Koch:
Recent versions of JAWS recognise the "aural" media type.
Does it support aural properties (azimuth, cue, ...)? To which extent?
Without such support, recognizing "aural" is not very useful. Admittedly,
there are some things that could be done using just the display property
suitably, e.g. setting display: none for media other than aural, if you have
some explanation that is useful in aural use only.

--
Jukka K. Korpela ("Yucca")
http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/

Mar 9 '07 #5

P: n/a
Jukka K. Korpela schrieb:
Scripsit Johannes Koch:
>Recent versions of JAWS recognise the "aural" media type.

Does it support aural properties (azimuth, cue, ...)?
No, I don't hink so.
Admittedly, there are some things that could be done using just the
display property suitably, e.g. setting display: none for media other
than aural, if you have some explanation that is useful in aural use only.
ACK
--
Johannes Koch
In te domine speravi; non confundar in aeternum.
(Te Deum, 4th cent.)
Mar 9 '07 #6

P: n/a
On 9 Mar, 05:52, Bergamot <berga...@visi.comwrote:
For your perusal:http://www.access-matters.com/screen...-test-results/
Thanks, that's an interesting link.

Mind you, for a site about accessibility, they have some shocking
usability errors! Any web page with "hint:" on it to explain how to
read the page is getting things badly wrong.

Also, does anyone else look at that page and think of Sting in Dune?
8-)

Mar 9 '07 #7

P: n/a
Johannes Koch wrote:
Sherm Pendley schrieb:
>Do the most-used speech readers pay any attention to media-specific
stylesheets?

Recent versions of JAWS recognise the "aural" media type.
Equally important is whether non-aural browsers ignore everything inside
@media aural { }. Do they?
Mar 9 '07 #8

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