By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
437,739 Members | 1,059 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 437,739 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

"WWW." suffix

P: 26
hi,
can anyone tell me that why "www." suffix is used in some URLs and why not in others?

thanks.
Feb 17 '07 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
4 Replies


Expert 100+
P: 1,892
hi,
can anyone tell me that why "www." suffix is used in some URLs and why not in others?

thanks.
http://thescripts.com

is the same as

http://www.thescripts.com
Feb 17 '07 #2

drhowarddrfine
Expert 5K+
P: 7,435
www is not necessary but must be accounted for by the server handling the page. www, of course, stands for World Wide Web which, iirc, helped distinguish itself from the rest of the internet before www came to be.

The way the 'net works is up a tree. iow, when you send a request for a page from your browser, it sends the request for a certain page to the next server up the line. So a request for "mypage" from www.thescripts.com/mypage gets sent to your ISP which might (or might not) be a DNS resolver (Domain Name Server). It figures out the page you request is part of the .com domain. From there it looks up all the names in the .com domain until it finds ".thescripts". Notice the "dot".

It then sends the request to whatever IP address ".the scripts" is at. That server then decides where to send it. In this case, the next name up the line is "www" but no dot. Dot is always the top parent of the internet. If "thescripts" had a server called "www", or if "thescripts" responds to "www", then you will get the page. If their server is set to ignore the www, then you won't.

Some DNS servers will also resolve the differences between the two.

I used to know this whole detail better than that so I may have missed something or be slightly off but it's the general idea.
Feb 17 '07 #3

Expert 100+
P: 1,892
www is not necessary but must be accounted for by the server handling the page. www, of course, stands for World Wide Web which, iirc, helped distinguish itself from the rest of the internet before www came to be.

The way the 'net works is up a tree. iow, when you send a request for a page from your browser, it sends the request for a certain page to the next server up the line. So a request for "mypage" from www.thescripts.com/mypage gets sent to your ISP which might (or might not) be a DNS resolver (Domain Name Server). It figures out the page you request is part of the .com domain. From there it looks up all the names in the .com domain until it finds ".thescripts". Notice the "dot".

It then sends the request to whatever IP address ".the scripts" is at. That server then decides where to send it. In this case, the next name up the line is "www" but no dot. Dot is always the top parent of the internet. If "thescripts" had a server called "www", or if "thescripts" responds to "www", then you will get the page. If their server is set to ignore the www, then you won't.

Some DNS servers will also resolve the differences between the two.

I used to know this whole detail better than that so I may have missed something or be slightly off but it's the general idea.
Yeah that's what I was talking about.
Feb 18 '07 #4

P: 26
Yeah that's what I was talking about.
thats enough.
thanku so much
Feb 19 '07 #5

Post your reply

Sign in to post your reply or Sign up for a free account.