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(method="post" || method="POST") && (method="get" || method="GET")

Let's not argue about semantics. Let's talk about semasiology.

Do specifications exist for using mixed case, upper case,
lower case for the contents of the method employed?

My own preferences lean towards the all lower-case
model, simply because it reads a little easier when deployed
with other XHTML semaphorings.

--
Jim Carlock
Post replies to the group.
Feb 15 '07 #1
1 3231
Jim Carlock wrote:
Let's not argue about semantics. Let's talk about semasiology.

Do specifications exist for using mixed case, upper case,
lower case for the contents of the method employed?
http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/interac...ml#adef-method says
"case-insensitive", so if you are using HTML you can do as you please.

http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/#h-4.11 says the values of enumerated
variables such as these must be in lower case, so if you are using XHTML
1.0 Strict then it's lower case only.

Finally, http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml11/changes.html#a_changes lists no
change related to attribute value case, so it appears that lower case is
the only option if you are using XHTML 1.1.
>
My own preferences lean towards the all lower-case
model, simply because it reads a little easier when deployed
with other XHTML semaphorings.
So it looks like you are in luck, since the XHTML definitions agree with
your preference. :-)

Chris Beall

Feb 15 '07 #2

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.

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