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Hey lets all craete BAD pages for grades =]

P: n/a
So this is to be our assignment for the next school term. The idea is
good: to create a web-site for a local recycling plant.

Unfortunatly, the marking scheme is teaching the candidates how to
create web-pages in the worst possible way - the 90s style...

http://tinyurl.com/2pp2sm (It's a PDF of the marking scheme for the
teachers)

A couple of extracts:

"In addition, such [higher level] candidates will need to provide
links to email and make use of hotspots/image maps."

Since when have image maps been even close to acceptable for
navigation?
"Many web-authoring packages include the ability to create forms.
Using HTML coding and some free web-authoring tools will limit some
students although it is still possible."

I'll be more *limited* if I code my HTML myself?
Now look, OCR, this is NOT web-design!

Acoording to this marking scheme, if I create a page that is up to
modern standards it seems that I will get a lower grade than if I
relied entirely on FrontPage. Hoorah

</rant>

~Brendan Gillatt~
www.brendangillatt.co.uk
http://pgp.mit.edu:11371/pks/lookup?...rch=0x6E265E61
Feb 13 '07 #1
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6 Replies


P: n/a
Brendan Gillatt wrote:
>
Since when have image maps been even close to acceptable for
navigation?
There isn't anything inherently wrong with client-side image maps,
though they shouldn't be treated as though their use is itself a goal.
There have been problems with browser implementations of them. It's also
useful to duplicate the links in text form, at the bottom of the page
perhaps. The two purposes can be served at once by using A tags instead
of AREA tags, and placing the MAP element containing the A tags at the
point in the page where the links should appear.

Server-side image maps should be avoided for any purpose where the
coordinates of the click are to be used directly, as in an image map of
the earth where one clicks a point to request a detail map centered on
that point. In those cases, an alternative, more accessible interface
also ought to be provided.
Feb 14 '07 #2

P: n/a
On 14 Feb, 19:48, Harlan Messinger <hmessinger.removet...@comcast.net>
wrote:
There isn't anything inherently wrong with client-side image maps,
Have you read the linked PDF?

Although there's little "inherently wrong" in anything, the marking
scheme described and the teaching assuemd to go with it is just about
as far-removed from competent current practice as it's possible to
get, yet still be vaguely describable as being the same subject.

Feb 15 '07 #3

P: n/a
Andy Dingley wrote:
On 14 Feb, 19:48, Harlan Messinger <hmessinger.removet...@comcast.net>
wrote:
>There isn't anything inherently wrong with client-side image maps,

Have you read the linked PDF?
No, but the remark to which I was responding came from the OP
irrespective of the PDF.
Although there's little "inherently wrong" in anything,
The OP's remark, "Since when have image maps been even close to
acceptable for navigation?" implied that there was.

Feb 15 '07 #4

P: n/a
On Thu, 15 Feb 2007 17:56:51 -0500, Harlan Messinger
<hm*******************@comcast.netwrote:
>Andy Dingley wrote:
The OP's remark, "Since when have image maps been even close to
acceptable for navigation?" implied that there was.
Sorry, maybe I wrote it in a bit of haste. What I was trying to say
was that the mark scheme expects image maps as part of the function of
a site -- irrespective of whether coordinates are needed.
Feb 18 '07 #5

P: n/a
I am also doing this qualification and have sent an email to OCR but
they only replied that they cannot answer my questions as I am a
candidate and I need to get my course tutor to contact them. I can see
why but this is a matter I and Brendan would like resolved before we
get to actually doing that unit.

Also according to the mark scheme/Grading Assesment Objectives for
this unit (Page six onwards of http://tinyurl.com/385jbq - the
specification handbook for tutors)

for Distinction level candidates AO2:
"Candidates will produce high quality pages using css."

Thats fine but then if we do that why do we need to:
"Tables will be used throughout to aid with the layout of different
components"
I see no point. Okay for tabular data, but for layout!!!

I think the whole of this unit needs to be looked at thoroughly, and
changed.

Feb 21 '07 #6

P: n/a
In article <11**********************@k78g2000cwa.googlegroups .com>,
<URL:mailto:mp*****@gmail.comwrote:
Also according to the mark scheme/Grading Assesment Objectives for
this unit (Page six onwards of http://tinyurl.com/385jbq - the
specification handbook for tutors)
That's improved. I refused to teach a previous version of this course
because it was possible to pass without ever logging in to a www server or
running a browser -and- to fail when creating a fully validated, html 4.0
strict, with media specific css, site, that met every specification to the
letter. At least now you'll have to print out the evidence from a browser.
for Distinction level candidates AO2:
"Candidates will produce high quality pages using css."

Thats fine but then if we do that why do we need to:
"Tables will be used throughout to aid with the layout of different
components"
I see no point. Okay for tabular data, but for layout!!!

I think the whole of this unit needs to be looked at thoroughly, and
changed.
Very little has changed since the beginning of www use in schools. Where
used as a resource, and not abused, it has many benefits. Where taught as a
subject it is diabolical.

Below degree level most examination courses teach questionable practice at
best and, imo, certificates should be regarded as a disqualificaton.

Depending on your future intentions you might decide to take this course and
immediately forget all you learned because the certificate is required by
some unenlightened employers or you might take a course in a subject that
would be of more use to a future www designer. I suggest one in report
writing, copywriting for journalists, or, at a pinch, creative writing. The
ability to convey a message in a manner suitable for www readers is one of
the rarest skills around.

Cheerio,

--
>de*********@clara.net
Feb 22 '07 #7

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