473,231 Members | 1,826 Online
Bytes | Software Development & Data Engineering Community
Post Job

Home Posts Topics Members FAQ

Join Bytes to post your question to a community of 473,231 software developers and data experts.

HTML vs BODY container

VK
Richard Cornford wrote:
The html element is the outermost element in an (x)HTML document.
All other elements are its descendants, with its direct children being
the head and body elements.


It is not exactly true at least for Firefox (keep missing to test in
full on Opera). In Firefox HTML is a container as any other where you
can add say images and div's. Try
html {
width:100%;
height:100%;
background-color:#DDD;
}
body {
width:75%;
background-color:#FFF;
}

and now add say <img src=...> between </body> and </html>.

IE does automatical tree correction in such case (so <body> container
is still used instead). I don't know if it's a proper reading of specs
or a rendering bug - but should be mentioned.

May 29 '06 #1
10 6234
VK wrote:

(Follow ups set)
Richard Cornford wrote:
The html element is the outermost element in an (x)HTML document.
All other elements are its descendants, with its direct children being
the head and body elements.
It is not exactly true at least for Firefox (keep missing to test in
full on Opera). In Firefox HTML is a container as any other where you
can add say images and div's. Try

.... and now add say <img src=...> between </body> and </html>.


Since (X)HTML documents are not allowed <img> elements as child elements of
the <html> element, that isn't an HTML document. How browsers handle
author's errors is irrelevent.

--
David Dorward <http://blog.dorward.me.uk/> <http://dorward.me.uk/>
Home is where the ~/.bashrc is
May 29 '06 #2
VK

David Dorward wrote:
Since (X)HTML documents are not allowed <img> elements as child elements of
the <html> element, that isn't an HTML document. How browsers handle
author's errors is irrelevent.


ACK

May 29 '06 #3
VK wrote:
It is not exactly true at least for Firefox (keep missing to test in
full on Opera). In Firefox HTML is a container as any other where you
can add say images and div's.


No browser (that I know of) does this properly anyway.

e.g.

HTML {
background: cyan;
margin: 2em;
padding: 2em;
}

In a correct rendering of CSS, the 2em of blank space created by the
padding should be cyan, but the 2em of blank space created by the margin
should not.

This is not really an appropriate topic for either of the groups you
posted to though. Cross-posted to c.i.w.a.stylesheets, follow-ups set.

--
Toby A Inkster BSc (Hons) ARCS
Contact Me ~ http://tobyinkster.co.uk/contact

May 29 '06 #4
VK wrote:
Richard Cornford wrote:
The html element is the outermost element in an (x)HTML
document. All other elements are its descendants, with
its direct children being the head and body elements.
It is not exactly true at least for Firefox


How on earth would you know?
(keep missing to test in full on Opera).
In Firefox HTML is a container as any other where you
can add say images and div's.
Bullshit.
Try
html {
width:100%;
height:100%;
background-color:#DDD;
}
body {
width:75%;
background-color:#FFF;
}

and now add say <img src=...> between </body>
and </html>.
OK, I tried this in Firefox (with scripting and pop-ups enabled):-

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"
"http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html>
<head>
<title></title>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type"
content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<script type="text/javascript">
var win = window.open('','');
function showDom(){
var div = document;
var st = '<pre>'+listNodeStart(div);
st += showChildren(div, '\t');
st += listNodeEnd(div, '');
st += '<\/pre>';
win.document.write(st);
win.document.close();
}
function showChildren(el, ind){
var node, st = '';
for(var c = 0;c < el.childNodes.length;++c){
node = el.childNodes[c];
if(node.nodeType == 1){
st += ind+listNodeStart(node);
st += showChildren(node, (ind+'\t'));
st += listNodeEnd(node, ind);
}
}
return st;
}
function listNodeStart(el){
return ('&lt;' + el.nodeName +
((el.type)?(' type=\"' + el.type+'\"'):'')
+ '&gt\n');
}
function listNodeEnd(el, ind){
return el.childNodes.length?(ind+'&lt;/' + el.nodeName +'&gt\n'):'';
}

</script>
<style type="text/css">
html {
width:100%;
height:100%;
background-color:#DDD;
}
body {
width:75%;
background-color:#FFF;
}
</style>
</head>
<body onload="showDom();">
</body>
<img src="images/example.gif" alt="">
</html>

It shows that in the DOM structure created from mark-up with an IMG in
your proposed invalid context Firefox has placed the IMG element as a
direct child of the BODY element. The DOM tree is structurally valid
even if the mark-up is not.

<snip> ... I don't know if it's a proper reading of specs
or a rendering bug - but should be mentioned.


It would save everyone a considerable amount of time if you did not
mention anything that you do not understand, is irrelevant or false.
That is; just be silent.

Richard.
May 29 '06 #5
VK

Richard Cornford wrote:
It shows that in the DOM structure created from mark-up with an IMG in
your proposed invalid context Firefox has placed the IMG element as a
direct child of the BODY element. The DOM tree is structurally valid
even if the mark-up is not.


1. Please don't crosspost

2. Visually image is rendered as located in html container (anyone can
see including you). The same can be achieved with position:relative and
negative offset. I'm glad to hear that FF autocorrects DOM tree as IE
does. In this case it is a rendering error or the chosen AID behavior
as I proposed in the OP.

May 29 '06 #6
On 2006-05-29 09:40:15 +0200, "VK" <sc**********@yahoo.com> said:
IE does automatical tree correction in such case (so <body> container
is still used instead). I don't know if it's a proper reading of specs
or a rendering bug - but should be mentioned.


That's the point..
this script was written for IE only.... and I am testing it with Firefox

I changed :
this.image = new Image();
document.appendChild(this.image);
to :
this.image = new Image();
this.image.width="0";
this.image.height="0";
document.body.appendChild(this.image);

and it works... I got it invisible, but there...

May 29 '06 #7
VK wrote:
Richard Cornford wrote:
It shows that in the DOM structure created from mark-up with
an IMG in your proposed invalid context Firefox has placed
the IMG element as a direct child of the BODY element. The
DOM tree is structurally valid even if the mark-up is not.
1. Please don't crosspost


Who are you to be giving me instructions?

1. It was you who added to inappropriate cross-post to c.i.w.a.h
(inappropriate because the subject of the post to which you
posted a cross-posted response was the structure of the document
object model exposed to scripting by web browsers, even if you
did not include sufficient context to make that clear to readers
of c.i.w.a.h. That is, the subject was exclusively script related
and had nothing to do with mark-up).

2. If you wanted to restrict/direct the groups in which responses
should appear it is _your_ responsibility to set follow-ups _and_
state that you have done so.

3. Your statement that I was in error was demonstrably false, as
everyone expects from you. If you would learn to appreciate that
mental process that you apply to understanding web technologies
is so fundamentally flawed that you almost never manage to
understand what is said, draw correct conclusions or even make
meaningful/coherent statements, you could save everyone
considerable time and effort by not bothering them with your
nonsense.
2. Visually image is rendered as located in html container
(anyone can see including you). The same can be achieved with
position:relative and negative offset.
If your issue is presentation then c.i.w.a.s would have been a more
appropriate cross post (though the response would inevitably be that if
you write invalid mark-up its presentation will tend to be uncertain).
My statement was about DOM structure (related only to scripting), your
response was substantially false and irrelevant in all other respects
(as usual).
I'm glad to hear that FF autocorrects DOM tree as IE does.
Firefox's error correction of structurally invalid mark-up in DOM
creation is not the same as IE's (as I have demonstrated to you in the
past), it is just similar in this instance.
In this case it is a rendering error or the chosen AID
behavior as I proposed in the OP.


Gibberish.

[Follow-ups to comp.lang.javascript]

Richard.
May 29 '06 #8
VK wrote:

1. Please don't crosspost

Why not, pray? If a post is on-topic for two groups, and the poster
reads both groups, then surely crossposting is perfectly in-order?

If you don't like reading crossposts twice, then perhaps you need a
newsreader that doesn't show them twice. GoogleGroups is not a
newsreader at all, by the way, and I don't think Usenet posters should
feel in any way constrained by what is and isn't convenient for
GoogleGropers.

--
Jack.

May 29 '06 #9
VK
<OT>

<g />

</OT>

May 29 '06 #10
Josselin wrote:
On 2006-05-29 09:40:15 +0200, "VK" <sc**********@yahoo.com> said:
IE does automatical tree correction in such case (so <body> container
is still used instead). I don't know if it's a proper reading of specs
or a rendering bug - but should be mentioned.
That's the point..
this script was written for IE only.... and I am testing it with Firefox

I changed :
this.image = new Image();
document.appendChild(this.image);
to :
this.image = new Image();


Nobody has commented on the *approach* so far, so I feel obliged to do it.

A proprietary Image object is different from a standardized HTMLImageElement
object. At least it should be. Relying on equality because it is so in
one or two (or a handful) UAs is error-prone.
this.image.width="0";
this.image.height="0";
Neither property expects a string value.
document.body.appendChild(this.image);
This will not only fail, it will break in some UAs.

<URL:http://pointedears.de/scripts/test/whatami#inference>
and it works...
By coincidence.
I got it invisible, but there...


Your implementation of an "image cache" is nonsense. Caching, if it happens
at all, happens already when the value of the `src' property of an Image
object is changed -- as the article you are referring to states already.
As for `onreadystatechange', that event handler is IE-only (except of XHR).
Cross-browser (since Image objects were introduced in JavaScript 1.1, and
all vendors have copied DOM Level 0 so far) is `onload', and unsurprisingly
it does not require a bogus image added to the document.

See also <URL:http://pointedears.de/hoverMe>.

Note that without client-side script support nothing is cached; there are
prefetching techniques with HTML, though, that can be exploited here.
F'up2 cljs

PointedEars
--
What one man can invent another can discover.
-- Sherlock Holmes in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's
"The Adventure of the Dancing Men"
May 29 '06 #11

This thread has been closed and replies have been disabled. Please start a new discussion.

Similar topics

16
by: Terry | last post by:
Hi, This is a newbie's question. I want to preload 4 images and only when all 4 images has been loaded into browser's cache, I want to start a slideshow() function. If images are not completed...
4
by: Zuel | last post by:
Hi Folks. So I have a small problem. My DoPostBack function is not writen to the HTML page nor are the asp:buttons calling the DoPostBack. My Goal is to create a totaly dynamic web page where...
6
by: Paolo Pignatelli | last post by:
I have an aspx code behind page that goes something like this in the HTML view: <asp:HyperLink id=HyperLink1 runat="server" NavigateUrl='<%#"mailto:" &amp;...
2
by: Jake Barnes | last post by:
Using javascript closures to create singletons to ensure the survival of a reference to an HTML block when removeChild() may remove the last reference to the block and thus destory the block is...
10
by: Josselin | last post by:
(Mac 10.4.6 , Firefox/1.5.0.3 Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; U; PPC Mac OS X Mach-O; fr; rv:1.8.0.3) Gecko/20060426 ) I am trying to setup a Reusable Image Cache in JS ( as per...
6
by: Bill | last post by:
Hi All, New to the whole .Net and C# thing but trying. In classic asp this was simple to fill a table with dynamic content and hyperlinks. Here is an example of what I am trying to do in classic...
9
Jezternz
by: Jezternz | last post by:
Okay! I want to make a function where you can input bascly the body of an html page. So basicly formatted html. Then I want my function to go through it and add some code to the Open Tags Only...
5
by: smittie31 | last post by:
I am having a problem with a border around me html page. The border does not flow thru the whole html page, it cuts off halfway. --> See http://keithborom.com/marlon-sanders CSS STYLESHEET ...
3
isladogs
by: isladogs | last post by:
The next Access Europe meeting will be on Wednesday 3 Jan 2024 starting at 18:00 UK time (6PM UTC) and finishing at about 19:15 (7.15PM). For other local times, please check World Time Buddy In...
0
by: abbasky | last post by:
### Vandf component communication method one: data sharing ​ Vandf components can achieve data exchange through data sharing, state sharing, events, and other methods. Vandf's data exchange method...
0
by: stefan129 | last post by:
Hey forum members, I'm exploring options for SSL certificates for multiple domains. Has anyone had experience with multi-domain SSL certificates? Any recommendations on reliable providers or specific...
0
Git
by: egorbl4 | last post by:
Скачал я git, хотел начать настройку, а там вылезло вот это Что это? Что мне с этим делать? ...
1
by: davi5007 | last post by:
Hi, Basically, I am trying to automate a field named TraceabilityNo into a web page from an access form. I've got the serial held in the variable strSearchString. How can I get this into the...
0
by: MeoLessi9 | last post by:
I have VirtualBox installed on Windows 11 and now I would like to install Kali on a virtual machine. However, on the official website, I see two options: "Installer images" and "Virtual machines"....
0
by: DolphinDB | last post by:
Tired of spending countless mintues downsampling your data? Look no further! In this article, you’ll learn how to efficiently downsample 6.48 billion high-frequency records to 61 million...
0
by: Aftab Ahmad | last post by:
Hello Experts! I have written a code in MS Access for a cmd called "WhatsApp Message" to open WhatsApp using that very code but the problem is that it gives a popup message everytime I clicked on...
0
by: Aftab Ahmad | last post by:
So, I have written a code for a cmd called "Send WhatsApp Message" to open and send WhatsApp messaage. The code is given below. Dim IE As Object Set IE =...

By using Bytes.com and it's services, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

To disable or enable advertisements and analytics tracking please visit the manage ads & tracking page.