By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
446,376 Members | 1,599 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 446,376 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

doubt in printer options

P: n/a
Hi Friends,
I am having some doubt. I want to print an ASP Page, for this i need to
use java script.
the problem is while printing if the line is too big, i can't print
those data properly . i am losing some data in the last.

What i want is if at all, the line is big, it should take landscape
proprety in place of Portrait..

Does anyone knows the answer give me reply soon

Thank u..

Mar 17 '06 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
11 Replies


P: n/a

kr**********@gmail.com wrote:
What i want is if at all, the line is big, it should take landscape
proprety in place of Portrait..


This is a nuisance and we really need a better solution.

But for IE-only, and by using an ActiveX you can fix this problem (and
set margins and headers too). Use MeadCo's ScriptX control.
http://www.meadroid.com/scriptx/

Mar 17 '06 #2

P: n/a
kr**********@gmail.com wrote:
Hi Friends,
I am having some doubt. I want to print an ASP Page, for this i need to
use java script.
the problem is while printing if the line is too big, i can't print
those data properly . i am losing some data in the last.

What i want is if at all, the line is big, it should take landscape
proprety in place of Portrait..


You mean, you want your web page to have greater control over the user's
computer than any other software that exists? Your web page doesn't know
what the printer's capabilities are. It doesn't know how much will fit
on a line. The printer doesn't report back to the browser while it's
printing to tell it things like, "Oh, I just printed a line more than 20
cm wide!" What do you expect to happen if your page is too wide to print
even in landscape?

What you should be doing is designing your web pages so that they fit
onto whatever medium they are displayed on or printed to. Flexible
layout, in other words.
Mar 17 '06 #3

P: n/a
Harlan Messinger wrote:
What you should be doing is designing your web pages so that they fit
onto whatever medium they are displayed on or printed to.


That's not the question here. The problem is how to force a physical
device into one mode (landscape) rather than another (portrait). This
is entirely reasonable for the page to request, no more than requesting
a color (and the printer is equally entitled to reject either request,
if it's a fan-fold printer with only black ink)

Mar 17 '06 #4

P: n/a
"Andy Dingley" <di*****@codesmiths.com> writes:
Harlan Messinger wrote:
What you should be doing is designing your web pages so that they fit
onto whatever medium they are displayed on or printed to.


That's not the question here. The problem is how to force a physical
device into one mode (landscape) rather than another (portrait). This
is entirely reasonable for the page to request, no more than requesting
a color (and the printer is equally entitled to reject either request,
if it's a fan-fold printer with only black ink)


However, browser printing support is fairly poor anyway (I had a data
table I needed to print that was too wide to fit on a landscape A4
page last month - I couldn't find a browser that would print the
remainder of the width of the table on a second sheet)

--
Chris
Mar 17 '06 #5

P: n/a
Andy Dingley wrote:
Harlan Messinger wrote:
What you should be doing is designing your web pages so that they fit
onto whatever medium they are displayed on or printed to.
That's not the question here. The problem is how to force a physical
device into one mode (landscape) rather than another (portrait). This
is entirely reasonable for the page to request,


It's reasonable to say, "This page is designed to print landscape", not
to expect the program to figure out the line length at print time and
decide what to force the printer to do.

But then, this is the web, and, just as one ought to be designing pages
to fit the browser rather than resizing the browser to fit the page (or,
worse, expecting to be able to change the screen to a higher
resolution), it would be better practice to arrange the page to fit the
dimensions available.
no more than requesting
a color (and the printer is equally entitled to reject either request,
if it's a fan-fold printer with only black ink)


The OP didn't say "request", he said "force", so obviously his
expectations are stronger than yours.

Mar 17 '06 #6

P: n/a
In article <87************@dinopsis.dur.ac.uk>,
Chris Morris <c.********@durham.ac.uk> wrote:
However, browser printing support is fairly poor anyway (I had a data
table I needed to print that was too wide to fit on a landscape A4
page last month - I couldn't find a browser that would print the
remainder of the width of the table on a second sheet)


Opera will scale the print output however you want. I like this
feature.

-A
Mar 17 '06 #7

P: n/a
ax**@spamcop.net (axlq) writes:
Chris Morris <c.********@durham.ac.uk> wrote:
However, browser printing support is fairly poor anyway (I had a data
table I needed to print that was too wide to fit on a landscape A4
page last month - I couldn't find a browser that would print the
remainder of the width of the table on a second sheet)


Opera will scale the print output however you want. I like this
feature.


Opera was what I eventually used to print it out. The table was about
five A4 sheets wide at normal zoom, though, and when reduced to 25% so
it fit on A4 landscape it was barely readable. It was sufficient -
just - but not what I actually wanted to print.

What I could have done was found a driver that supported A0, printed
to file, and then used some postscript utilities to cut it up into
separate A4 sheets, but I didn't have time to do all that and was
hoping that *some* browser had it as a feature.

This is getting off-topic, though.

--
Chris
Mar 17 '06 #8

P: n/a
17 Mar 2006 16:19:27 +0000 from Chris Morris
<c.********@durham.ac.uk>:
However, browser printing support is fairly poor anyway (I had a data
table I needed to print that was too wide to fit on a landscape A4
page last month - I couldn't find a browser that would print the
remainder of the width of the table on a second sheet)


Mozilla (and Firefox, IIRC) offers a setting "shrink to fit page
width" in the Page Setup dialog.

That's not the same as printing the excess on a second page, but at
least it does get printed.

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
HTML 4.01 spec: http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/
validator: http://validator.w3.org/
CSS 2.1 spec: http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS21/
validator: http://jigsaw.w3.org/css-validator/
Why We Won't Help You:
http://diveintomark.org/archives/200..._wont_help_you
Mar 17 '06 #9

P: n/a
Fri, 17 Mar 2006 11:20:51 -0500 from Harlan Messinger
<hm*******************@comcast.net>:
It's reasonable to say, "This page is designed to print landscape", not
to expect the program to figure out the line length at print time and
decide what to force the printer to do.


Sorry, but why is that reasonable? Wouldn't it depend on the
resolution of the printer and on the user's font choices whether a
page needs landscape or can fit in portrait?

--
Stan Brown, Oak Road Systems, Tompkins County, New York, USA
http://OakRoadSystems.com/
HTML 4.01 spec: http://www.w3.org/TR/html401/
validator: http://validator.w3.org/
CSS 2.1 spec: http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS21/
validator: http://jigsaw.w3.org/css-validator/
Why We Won't Help You:
http://diveintomark.org/archives/200..._wont_help_you
Mar 17 '06 #10

P: n/a
Stan Brown wrote:
Fri, 17 Mar 2006 11:20:51 -0500 from Harlan Messinger
<hm*******************@comcast.net>:
It's reasonable to say, "This page is designed to print landscape", not
to expect the program to figure out the line length at print time and
decide what to force the printer to do.

Sorry, but why is that reasonable?


Because it may be realistic, if the page contains images wider than a
printed page in portrait mode or a table of data twenty columns wide.
It's reasonable in the same way it's reasonable to float one block to
the right of another--as long as it will sink below the second block if
the display is too narrow for the float to succeed. There's nothing
wrong with specifying the *ideal* layout as long as the display will
still work reasonably under other circumstances.
Wouldn't it depend on the
resolution of the printer and on the user's font choices whether a
page needs landscape or can fit in portrait?


Depends.
Mar 17 '06 #11

P: n/a
In article <48************@individual.net>,
Harlan Messinger <hm*******************@comcast.net> wrote:
It's reasonable in the same way it's reasonable to float one block
to the right of another--as long as it will sink below the second
block if the display is too narrow for the float to succeed.


I'm still a CSS newbie, so I have to ask: is there any way to
*prevent* the above from happening? I have run into one situation
where it was undesirable to have the floating block sink below its
neighbor when the display got too narrow; it was preferable to let
it get float close as possible and then stop, requiring horizontal
scrolling in the browser.

I didn't know how to accomplish this, so I ended up using a table
for that part of the layout.

-A
Mar 18 '06 #12

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.