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Text rendering problem with higher monitor DPI

P: n/a
I just purchased a Samsung 930B flat-panel monitor. Its *recommended*
resolution is 1280x1024.

I was previously running at 1024x768, but I also work with graphics. Any
images that were square or circle looked about 10% taller than they should
be. Naturally, correcting the screen resolution to the monitor's native of
1280x1024 fixed this and displayed more accurate proportions.

Because this change made all screen elements microscopic, my next step was
upping the monitor's DPI setting to Large (120dpi). Unfortunately, this
causes disproportion in the text in my web site, and I cannot decide whether
to change Internet Explorer's text size from Medium to Smaller. (At 120dpi,
Smaller is the closest match to where I was before).

I believe my best bet is to code the text size in my web site to compensate
for these changes. Can anyone give me any options which may help keep my web
site's text consistent through changes in resolution and DPI?
Feb 16 '06 #1
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6 Replies


P: n/a
Gazing into my crystal ball I observed "Yeah" <ye**@positive.net> writing
in news:YASIf.2403$et.2210@dukeread12:
I just purchased a Samsung 930B flat-panel monitor. Its *recommended*
resolution is 1280x1024.

I was previously running at 1024x768, but I also work with graphics.
Any images that were square or circle looked about 10% taller than they
should be. Naturally, correcting the screen resolution to the monitor's
native of 1280x1024 fixed this and displayed more accurate proportions.

Because this change made all screen elements microscopic, my next step
was upping the monitor's DPI setting to Large (120dpi). Unfortunately,
this causes disproportion in the text in my web site, and I cannot
decide whether to change Internet Explorer's text size from Medium to
Smaller. (At 120dpi, Smaller is the closest match to where I was
before).

I believe my best bet is to code the text size in my web site to
compensate for these changes. Can anyone give me any options which may
help keep my web site's text consistent through changes in resolution
and DPI?


Yes, don't set a font size at all, or set it in percentages, eg:

body {font-size:100%}
h1 {font-size:130%}
..legaleze {font-size:85%}

--
Adrienne Boswell
http://www.cavalcade-of-coding.info
Please respond to the group so others can share
Feb 16 '06 #2

P: n/a
In article <YASIf.2403$et.2210@dukeread12>, "Yeah" <ye**@positive.net>
wrote:
I just purchased a Samsung 930B flat-panel monitor. Its *recommended*
resolution is 1280x1024.

[snip complaints that font size in web browser is now too small]

I believe my best bet is to code the text size in my web site to compensate
for these changes. Can anyone give me any options which may help keep my web
site's text consistent through changes in resolution and DPI?


Are you the only person who visits your web site? If so, then, heck,
specify the font size in points, and do whatever makes you happy.

Oh, wait. You say your web site is on the Internet, and available to the
public? Well, in that case, it'd be quite selfish of you to change the
size of text that _all_ of your visitors will see, simply because your
own personal browsing situation has changed. In that case, you should
adjust your own _browser's_ settings so that text on your web site (and
presumably, most others) is at a size that you can read easily, and
trust that your visitors will do the same.

Forcing some font size on your visitors in order to improve your own
personal browsing situation is not only a crude solution, it's rude.

--
Joel.
Feb 16 '06 #3

P: n/a
Yeah wrote:
I just purchased a Samsung 930B flat-panel monitor. Its *recommended*
resolution is 1280x1024.

I was previously running at 1024x768, but I also work with graphics. Any
images that were square or circle looked about 10% taller than they should
be. Naturally, correcting the screen resolution to the monitor's native of
1280x1024 fixed this and displayed more accurate proportions.

Because this change made all screen elements microscopic, my next step was
upping the monitor's DPI setting to Large (120dpi). Unfortunately, this
causes disproportion in the text in my web site, and I cannot decide whether
to change Internet Explorer's text size from Medium to Smaller. (At 120dpi,
Smaller is the closest match to where I was before).

I believe my best bet is to code the text size in my web site to compensate
for these changes. Can anyone give me any options which may help keep my web
site's text consistent through changes in resolution and DPI?


Yeah,

See http://pages.prodigy.net/chris_beall...nt%20size.html.

Chris Beall

Feb 16 '06 #4

P: n/a
In article <Xn****************************@69.28.186.121>, Adrienne
Boswell <ar********@sbcglobal.net> writes
body {font-size:100%}


Pardon my ignorance (I mean that, I wasn't being sarcastic), but
wouldn't this be the default anyway? Isn't it pointless setting this?

--
Alan Silver
(anything added below this line is nothing to do with me)
Feb 20 '06 #5

P: n/a
Alan Silver wrote:
In article <Xn****************************@69.28.186.121>, Adrienne
Boswell <ar********@sbcglobal.net> writes
body {font-size:100%}


Pardon my ignorance (I mean that, I wasn't being sarcastic), but
wouldn't this be the default anyway? Isn't it pointless setting this?


Yes, it is the default, but as I understand it, doing the setting helps
alleviate an IE bug, where that browser tends to get confused if it is
not declared.

It also shows your intent to observe user defaults to anyone reading
your code.

--
-bts
-Warning: I brake for lawn deer
Feb 20 '06 #6

P: n/a
In article <fZ******************@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net>,
Beauregard T. Shagnasty <a.*********@example.invalid> writes
Alan Silver wrote:
In article <Xn****************************@69.28.186.121>, Adrienne
Boswell <ar********@sbcglobal.net> writes
body {font-size:100%}


Pardon my ignorance (I mean that, I wasn't being sarcastic), but
wouldn't this be the default anyway? Isn't it pointless setting this?


Yes, it is the default, but as I understand it, doing the setting helps
alleviate an IE bug, where that browser tends to get confused if it is
not declared.

It also shows your intent to observe user defaults to anyone reading
your code.


Thank you. That makes it clear. I shall add that line in future.

--
Alan Silver
(anything added below this line is nothing to do with me)
Feb 20 '06 #7

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