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Two Questions on Link REL/REV and dead-end hyperlinks.

Hello all,

I'm making a calendar section in a website. Each month is its own page and
navigated by Previous / Next links. I have it working now with standard
hyperlinks, but I want to learn how to use Link Rel and Link Rev commands to
do the navigation.

At the W3C website it shows how to use the Link Rel and Link Rev in the
<head> section:

<HEAD>
....other head information...
<TITLE>Chapter 5</TITLE>
<LINK rel="prev" href="chapter4.html">
<LINK rel="next" href="chapter6.html">
</HEAD>
(copied and pasted from the site)

But, how do I make the associated hyperlinks in the body? The details for
that aren't clear to me . I'm not sure of it's usable for that at all. It
seems like it may only be for search engines and other search capabilities
to index a site's heirarchy.

Also, how to I make a hyperlink that goes nowhere, like a dead end? I
basically want the hyperlink "look" but if someone was to click on it, it
should just go nowhere. I'll be using a mouseover tool-tip effect on it
instead. I've seen <a href="#"> used, but when I use it snd click, I get a
directory tree. How would I do that?

Thanks in advance, everyone.

--
Viken K.
Dec 20 '05 #1
9 2760
Viken Karaguesian wrote:
At the W3C website it shows how to use the Link Rel and Link Rev in the
<head> section. But, how do I make the associated hyperlinks in the body?
With regular <a> elements.
The details for that aren't clear to me . I'm not sure of it's usable for
that at all. It seems like it may only be for search engines and other
search capabilities to index a site's heirarchy.
Users do need a browser that supports it ...

http://dorward.me.uk/tmp/nav.png

.... but its very nice to use as the links are always in the same place, and
scrolling / large amounts of content don't move them (so you can just hold
the mouse in place and keep clicking through).
Also, how to I make a hyperlink that goes nowhere, like a dead end? I
basically want the hyperlink "look" but if someone was to click on it, it
should just go nowhere.
Inviting people to click on something that doesn't respond to clicks? That's
a really bad idea.
I'll be using a mouseover tool-tip effect on it instead.


I suggest you use a <dfn>, <abbr> or whatever is appropriate along with some
CSS to make it stand out - but not to make it look like a link.
--
David Dorward <http://blog.dorward.me.uk/> <http://dorward.me.uk/>
Home is where the ~/.bashrc is
Dec 20 '05 #2
In our last episode,
<k4******************************@comcast.com>,
the lovely and talented Viken Karaguesian
broadcast on comp.infosystems.www.authoring.html:
Hello all, I'm making a calendar section in a website. Each month is its own page and
navigated by Previous / Next links. I have it working now with standard
hyperlinks, but I want to learn how to use Link Rel and Link Rev commands to
do the navigation. At the W3C website it shows how to use the Link Rel and Link Rev in the
<head> section: <HEAD>
...other head information...
<TITLE>Chapter 5</TITLE>
<LINK rel="prev" href="chapter4.html">
<LINK rel="next" href="chapter6.html">
</HEAD>
(copied and pasted from the site) But, how do I make the associated hyperlinks in the body?
You just said you had it working with standard hyperlinks.
Those are the ones in the body. Are they working or not?

Some browsers make links from the LINK elements in the head.
Others don't. You cannot control what the browser makes of such
links.
The details for that aren't clear to me . I'm not sure of it's
usable for that at all. It seems like it may only be for
search engines and other search capabilities to index a site's
heirarchy.
Yes, "browser" is commonly just a shorthand word for "user
agent," and that includes search engines. They may or may not
use the LINK elements to traverse sets of documents - or for
other purposes. You cannot control what the browser does with
this information.
Also, how to I make a hyperlink that goes nowhere, like a dead end? I
basically want the hyperlink "look" but if someone was to click on it, it
should just go nowhere.
What does that mean? How do you "go nowhere." If you just want
to be deceiptful and produce something that looks like a link,
but isn't, you can put it in a SPAN of a class that you then
style to look like an A element. If you want to cover the case
of a user who overrides your styling for A elements, you could
put it in A NAME with a class that you style like A HREF.
I'll be using a mouseover tool-tip effect on it instead. I've
seen <a href="#"> used, but when I use it snd click, I get a
directory tree. How would I do that?


Perhaps you could post a URL for a document that does this.

Whether you get a directory listing or not and when you do is
highly dependant on how your server is configured. If the
server allows this at all, you could try linking to a directory
that doesn't have any default document as defined in the server
configuration (i.e., no index.html, index.htm, index.shtml, etc.
- the list depending upon the server configuration). Most
servers can be configured to disallow directory listings
altogether. As there are differences in the way browsers
present directory listings, you probably cannot dummy up a
"directory listing" page that will look like the real thing in
all browsers.
--
Lars Eighner us****@larseighner.com http://www.larseighner.com/
Bac'n Bits: Humans don't know it's not bacon!
Dec 20 '05 #3
"Viken Karaguesian" <vikenkNO_SPAM@NO_SPAMcomcast.net> wrote:
At the W3C website it shows how to use the Link Rel and Link Rev in the
<head> section:
[...]
But, how do I make the associated hyperlinks in the body?
Prev/Next type navigation implemented via link elements provides a fully
independent navigation mechanism. However you can't rely on them since
not all browsers have a UI mechanism for them, and on those that do most
users will probably have it disabled. This means that you also have to
use regular hyperlinks in the body section, but there is no
"association" between these links and any corresponding <link> elements
in the document's head.

The principle of <link> type site navigation is a good idea in theory,
but in practice fatally flawed.
The details for
that aren't clear to me . I'm not sure of it's usable for that at all. It
seems like it may only be for search engines and other search capabilities
to index a site's heirarchy.


I doubt if for example the alternate language resource mechanism is
implemented in any search engine.

--
Spartanicus
Dec 20 '05 #4
On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 09:43:58 GMT, Spartanicus <in*****@invalid.invalid>
wrote:
The principle of <link> type site navigation is a good idea in theory,
but in practice fatally flawed.


Not fatally. Firefox does it very nicely with the Link Toolbar extension
Dec 20 '05 #5
> You just said you had it working with standard hyperlinks.
Those are the ones in the body. Are they working or not?


Yes, those work. Those are standard links. <a
href="december_2005.htm">. However, just for learning, I wanted to
figure out how to use the Link Rel / Rev.

I kind of envisioned a system where I would put the Link reference in
the <head> and in the body I would put something like
<a href="#next"> and the hyperlink would just go to the page listed in
the head.

But it seems to me now that Link Rel and Rev weren't designed to be
used that way.

Viken K.

Dec 20 '05 #6
> but there is no
"association" between these links and any corresponding <link> elements
in the document's head.


That's exactly what I wanted to know! At first, I thought that there
*would* be an association which would provide an easy Previous/Next
navigation system, but it seems like that's not what it was intended
for.

Viken K.

Dec 20 '05 #7
> Inviting people to click on something that doesn't respond to clicks? That's
a really bad idea.
I'll be using a mouseover tool-tip effect on it instead.


I suggest you use a <dfn>, <abbr> or whatever is appropriate along with some
CSS to make it stand out - but not to make it look like a link.


Well, to see an example of what I mean, go to
http://www.ssaes.org/test_site/calendar_2.htm

Mouse over "Wine Tasting Night" and a tool tip pops up. But, if it
didn't look like a hyperlink, people may not know to mouse over it and
would only stumble across it by mistake. It's only used as a tool tip
though - there is no actual hyperlink there. So if someone were to
click on it, I want there to be no response.

The working calendar model with Previous / Next links hasn't been
uploaded yet.

Viken K.

Dec 20 '05 #8
Viken Karaguesian wrote:
I suggest you use a <dfn>, <abbr> or whatever is appropriate along with
some CSS to make it stand out - but not to make it look like a link.
http://www.ssaes.org/test_site/calendar_2.htm Mouse over "Wine Tasting Night" and a tool tip pops up.
Well - assuming I use a mouse ... and have JavaScript turned on.
But, if it didn't look like a hyperlink, people may not know to mouse over
it and would only stumble across it by mistake. It's only used as a tool
tip though - there is no actual hyperlink there. So if someone were to
click on it, I want there to be no response.


Since it looks like a link, people _expect_ something to happen when they
click on it. Make it look like something other then plain text, but don't
make it look like a link.

Better yet - remove the need for JavaScript. Turn it into a link to a page
that gives details about the event.

--
David Dorward <http://blog.dorward.me.uk/> <http://dorward.me.uk/>
Home is where the ~/.bashrc is
Dec 20 '05 #9
In article <do*******************@news.demon.co.uk>,
David Dorward <do*****@yahoo.com> wrote:
Viken Karaguesian wrote:
I suggest you use a <dfn>, <abbr> or whatever is appropriate along with
some CSS to make it stand out - but not to make it look like a link.

http://www.ssaes.org/test_site/calendar_2.htm

Mouse over "Wine Tasting Night" and a tool tip pops up.


Well - assuming I use a mouse ... and have JavaScript turned on.

Better yet - remove the need for JavaScript. Turn it into a link to a page
that gives details about the event.


I have seen an example of doing a fancy tooltip with CSS at
http://home.wanadoo.nl/b.de.zoete/_t...p_and_css.html
however as usual IE6 can't do anything with it (you have to give IE a
title attribute). Also the content of the tooltip is inline in the
paragraph, so it is visible to search engines and speech user agents.

However if the original poster styled the calendar event to not look
like a link (but to look like something you should check), and included
a title attribute for people with Javascript turned off, that might
work. Javascript seems legitimate to me for decoration, provided the
information is provided in some other way.

--
http://www.ericlindsay.com
Dec 20 '05 #10

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