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Icon as part of the page URL

P: n/a
I notice that a lot of Web pages have an icon that is displayed preceding
the URL in the place in the browser where the URL is displayed. When I
bookmark or add this to Favorites the icon is also displayed at the left of
the name of the page.

How do I do this? I am using Frontpage 2002, but know how to edit HTML
manually.

Thanks,

Ed
Sep 9 '05 #1
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8 Replies


P: n/a
Ed Isenberg wrote:
I notice that a lot of Web pages have an icon that is displayed preceding
the URL in the place in the browser where the URL is displayed.


http://www.allmyfaqs.com/faq.pl?Litt...e_location_bar
--
David Dorward <http://blog.dorward.me.uk/> <http://dorward.me.uk/>
Home is where the ~/.bashrc is
Sep 9 '05 #2

P: n/a
Ed Isenberg wrote:

I notice that a lot of Web pages have an icon that is displayed preceding
the URL in the place in the browser where the URL is displayed. When I
bookmark or add this to Favorites the icon is also displayed at the left of
the name of the page.

How do I do this? I am using Frontpage 2002, but know how to edit HTML
manually.


First, you need an icon, a file with the extension .ico. This is
NOT merely a JPEG, GIF, PNG, or BitMap file with the extension
changed, although some icon editors might allow for the conversion
of those graphics into an icon.

With IE (which I never use), I think the file must be named
favicon.ico, thus the term favicons to describe what you see. This
limits you to only one such icon per Web directory.

I use mnemonic names for my icons. See a little past half-way down
my <URL:http://www.rossde.com/internet/web_design.html>. These are
GIF files because some browsers can't display icon files as images
within the body of a Web page. While the extensions are thus .gif,
the names reflect the names of my .ico files.

In the HEAD section of my HTML, I have the following:
<link rel="shortcut icon" href="xxx" type="image/x-icon">
<link rel="icon" href="xxx" type="image/x-icon">
where xxx is the name (with extension) of the icon file. I'm not
sure why both LINKs were recommended. It might be that one
controls the icon in the address area of the browser, and the other
controls the icon in the bookmarks (favorites) file.

--

David E. Ross
<URL:http://www.rossde.com/>

I use Mozilla as my Web browser because I want a browser that
complies with Web standards. See <URL:http://www.mozilla.org/>.
Sep 9 '05 #3

P: n/a
Hi Ed,

Friday September 09 2005, Ed Isenberg writes to All:
From: Ed******@isenberg-family.net How do I do this? I am using Frontpage 2002, but know how to
edit HTML manually.


My code...

<head>
<link rel="icon" href="/favicon.ico" type="image/x-icon">
<link rel="shortcut icon" href="/favicon.ico"
type="image/x-icon">
</head>

It works in:

Mozilla Firefox
Opera

But not IE or Netscape, if you can get it working in
IE and Netscape tell me your secret. <smile>

By thw way your icon has to be a *.ico file and 16x16
in size. And in the root directory.

Gufus

.... Lubarsky's Law: There's always one more bug.
Sep 9 '05 #4

P: n/a
Gufus wrote:

Hi Ed,

Friday September 09 2005, Ed Isenberg writes to All:
> From: Ed******@isenberg-family.net

> How do I do this? I am using Frontpage 2002, but know how to
> edit HTML manually.


My code...

<head>
<link rel="icon" href="/favicon.ico" type="image/x-icon">
<link rel="shortcut icon" href="/favicon.ico"
type="image/x-icon">
</head>

It works in:

Mozilla Firefox
Opera

But not IE or Netscape, if you can get it working in
IE and Netscape tell me your secret. <smile>

By thw way your icon has to be a *.ico file and 16x16
in size. And in the root directory.


If the icon is in the same directory (folder) as the Web page,
remove the / from the file. Also, both LINK declarations require
TYPE.

That is, make it
<link rel="icon" href="favicon.ico" type="image/x-icon">
<link rel="shortcut icon" href="favicon.ico" type="image/x-icon">

I have noticed that some IE clones will not display the icons.
While the icons provide a nice personalization of a Web page, they
are not really necessary.

By the way, my icon editor allows me to create the icon in three
sizes (48x48, 32x32, and 16x16) and in three color modes (256 bits,
16 bits, and black-and-white (2 bits)). I do all six
combinations. This assures that the icon is presentable on as many
systems as possible. It also allows me to use the icons for
non-Web objects on my own computer.

--

David E. Ross
<URL:http://www.rossde.com/>

I use Mozilla as my Web browser because I want a browser that
complies with Web standards. See <URL:http://www.mozilla.org/>.
Sep 10 '05 #5

P: n/a
Hi David,

Saturday September 10 2005, David Ross writes to Gufus:
From: no****@nowhere.not
If the icon is in the same directory (folder) as the Web
page, remove the / from the file. Also, both LINK
declarations require TYPE.
Done.
icons. While the icons provide a nice personalization of a
Web page, they are not really necessary.


Agreed.. as a amateur programer for about 10+ years, always
learning stuff, and now into graphics, personalized graphics
are important to clients.

Thank you David for your input, it's now working with
IE, Netscape, Firefox and Opera.
Gufus

mailto:in**@gypsy-designs.com
http://www.gypsy-designs.com

.... Nothing is impossible if you don't have to do it yourself.
Sep 10 '05 #6

P: n/a
On Fri, 9 Sep 2005, David Ross wrote:
Ed Isenberg wrote:

I notice that a lot of Web pages have an icon that is displayed preceding
the URL in the place in the browser where the URL is displayed. When I
bookmark or add this to Favorites the icon is also displayed at the left of
the name of the page.

How do I do this? I am using Frontpage 2002, but know how to edit HTML
manually.
First, you need an icon, a file with the extension .ico. This is
NOT merely a JPEG, GIF, PNG, or BitMap file with the extension
changed, although some icon editors might allow for the conversion
of those graphics into an icon.

With IE (which I never use), I think the file must be named
favicon.ico, thus the term favicons to describe what you see. This
limits you to only one such icon per Web directory.


False. IE will use the file directed to below in the <link> code. However, if
none is specified, it will try to fetch file "favicon.ico" from its preferred
location. As to what is a preferred location, that seems to vary a bit with
different versions (and with other browsers), but assume that it could be any
directory from the document root on down to the current directory of the file
that is being served by the full URL pathname. Some versions only check the
document root. Some check the doc-root and the current. Others check every
directory between the two.
I use mnemonic names for my icons. See a little past half-way down
my <URL:http://www.rossde.com/internet/web_design.html>. These are
GIF files because some browsers can't display icon files as images
within the body of a Web page. While the extensions are thus .gif,
the names reflect the names of my .ico files.

In the HEAD section of my HTML, I have the following:
<link rel="shortcut icon" href="xxx" type="image/x-icon">
<link rel="icon" href="xxx" type="image/x-icon">
where xxx is the name (with extension) of the icon file. I'm not
sure why both LINKs were recommended. It might be that one
controls the icon in the address area of the browser, and the other
controls the icon in the bookmarks (favorites) file.


That is a logical guess. However, as the whole icon thing was a Micro$oft hack
in the first place, some other browsers first stared responding to the form
that IE didn't use. Putting in both covers all cases.
Sep 11 '05 #7

P: n/a
On Sun, 11 Sep 2005, D. Stussy wrote:
different versions (and with other browsers), but assume that it
could be any directory from the document root on down to the current
directory of the file that is being served by the full URL pathname.
Some versions only check the document root. Some check the doc-root
and the current. Others check every directory between the two.


Please, resist this confusion with "directories". A client agent
knows nothing about directories on the server - it only knows about
URL hierarchies. What IE does (at least in their original hack) in
hunting this wretched icon is to work its way down the URL
hierarchy[1] - this might or might not correspond to some file
directory hierarchy on the server, depending on the server
configuration and all.

best

[1] and leaving voluble error records in the server log, if one hasn't
taken steps to deal with that. Grumble.
Sep 11 '05 #8

P: n/a


David Ross wrote:
By the way, my icon editor allows me to create the icon in three
sizes (48x48, 32x32, and 16x16) and in three color modes (256 bits,
16 bits, and black-and-white (2 bits)). I do all six
combinations. This assures that the icon is presentable on as many
systems as possible. It also allows me to use the icons for
non-Web objects on my own computer.


Unless I am mistaken, that isn't enough to make it as universal
as possible (web and non-web).

Windows NT/2000 uses 16x16 for menus and shortcuts, 32x32 for
large icon folder display and 64x64 for large icon desktop display,
XP (and Mac OS-X??) can display 128x128 32-bit icons. Longhorn
appears to have something called "Live Icons" at 256x256, but the
description makes them sound like thumbnails, not real icons.

I did a bit of web surfing to see if microsoft has any definitions
of what can and can't be in a .ico file, and found several answers:

http://download.microsoft.com/downlo...e_metadata.doc
http://www.google.com/search?q=cache...e_metadata.doc
says:
"This section explains the precise format in which icons must be defined.
Icons must be specified in the ICO file format. These files can contain
multiple icons. Icons can be in three color depths:
32-bit ARGB color 8-bit color with 1-bit alpha 4-bit color with 1-bit alpha.
The following are the suggested sizes for icons (in pixels):
16x16 32x32 128x128 256x256

(I thought that ico files could contain monochrome data...)

http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en...asp?frame=true
says:
"While Windows imposes no restrictions on the sizes of icons,
common sizes include 16, 32, and 48 pixels square. For this
reason, developers are encouraged to include a minimum of the
following sizes and color depths in their icon resources:
16x16 16 colors
32x32 16 colors
48x48 256 colors
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en...asp?frame=true
says:
"Windows XP uses "24-bit icons with 8-bit masks up to 128x128 pixels
in size"

--
Guy Macon <http://www.guymacon.com/>

Sep 11 '05 #9

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