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Getting to the img src on another server.

P: n/a
Hi;

I am writing an html page that will live on one server in an ms windows
network, but access pictures from a directory on another ms windows
server in the network.

I know in html the values for img src use unix style path separators
with root ( "/" being your parent web directory.

However in windows land the path to my images would be something like

\\theOtherServerMapping\wwwRoot\inetpub\images

How would I write the path to such an image directory in my html tags?

Would I need to urls instead of file paths?

This is an honest question, please don't slam me. I need the help

Thanks in advance for any information

Jul 24 '05 #1
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6 Replies


P: n/a
jo***************@hotmail.com wrote:
Hi;

I am writing an html page that will live on one server in an ms windows
network, but access pictures from a directory on another ms windows
server in the network.

I know in html the values for img src use unix style path separators
with root ( "/" being your parent web directory.

However in windows land the path to my images would be something like

\\theOtherServerMapping\wwwRoot\inetpub\images

How would I write the path to such an image directory in my html tags?

Would I need to urls instead of file paths?


Yes.
http://whereever.com/...
If everything you're referencing lives somewhere else, you can put in as
<base href="..."> to say that _all_ your links are relative to that base
ref, rather than relative to where your page is - can help keep your
links short and sweet.
I've seen problems, though, with Novell BorderManager not linking
correctly ...
I'd guess you could use the file:// protocol internally in a similar
way, if this isn't strictly www.

Chris
Jul 24 '05 #2

P: n/a
jo***************@hotmail.com wrote:
Hi;

I am writing an html page that will live on one server in an ms windows
network, but access pictures from a directory on another ms windows
server in the network.

I know in html the values for img src use unix style path separators
with root ( "/" being your parent web directory.

However in windows land the path to my images would be something like

\\theOtherServerMapping\wwwRoot\inetpub\images

How would I write the path to such an image directory in my html tags?

Would I need to urls instead of file paths?

This is an honest question, please don't slam me. I need the help

Thanks in advance for any information

If the server with the images has a webserver installed *and* is accessible
to all users that can access your primary server, than use absolute URLs to
reference the images.
http://hostnameofimageserver.company/images/foobar.jpeg

If the 'image server' is not directly accessible from the machines where the
browser is running (e.g. behind a firewall) or has not webserver, but your
primary server can access is, you can create a 'virtual
directory' (assuming you are using IIS). Configure it to map the network
path \\theOtherServerMapping\wwwRoot\inetpub\images to the local
directory /images (IIS has a wizard for this IIRC). In this case
use /images/foobar.jpeg as src attribute of your images.
--
Benjamin Niemann
Email: pink at odahoda dot de
WWW: http://www.odahoda.de/
Jul 24 '05 #3

P: n/a
jo***************@hotmail.com wrote:

Hi;

I am writing an html page that will live on one server in an ms windows
network, but access pictures from a directory on another ms windows
server in the network.

I know in html the values for img src use unix style path separators
with root ( "/" being your parent web directory.

However in windows land the path to my images would be something like

\\theOtherServerMapping\wwwRoot\inetpub\images

How would I write the path to such an image directory in my html tags?

Would I need to urls instead of file paths?

This is an honest question, please don't slam me. I need the help

Thanks in advance for any information


If the entire Web site is for an intranet (internal to your
company) and not the Internet, URLs to files (pages, images, etc)
can be of the form
file://///server-name/directory/subdirectory/file-name
where

"file" is literally that, indicating a file server and not a Web
server.

Use forward slashes (virgules), not back-slashes. This allows you
to set this up where the file server, internal Web server, or
user's platform are not necessarily PCs running Windows. The
convention is to use only two virgules. However, Windows requires
five virgules in lieu of two back-slashes to indicate an external
file-server (external to the host of the Web server, within your
intranet). You may have to experiment with both two or five; try
five first.

"server-name" is the name of the file-server. If there are any
embedded blanks in the name, encode them as %20.

"directory" is the name of the folder (Windows) or directory (Unix)
where the file is located. Similarly, "subdirectory" is the name
of the folder below "directory". "Subdirectory" is omitted if the
file is directly in "directory"; on the other hand, there may be
several levels of "subdirectory". Avoid using names that contain
blanks; if that's not possible, encode them as %20 as with
"server-name".

"file-name" is the name of the file. Since you are using a
file-server that merely sends the file and not a Web server that
might provide the file-type in a header, it is necessary that
"file-name" includes an extension (e.g., .jpg, .gif).

Depending on how your intranet and file-servers are configured,
this may work only within a LAN (local-area network) or may work
within a WAN (wide-area network).

NOTE WELL: None of this works for Web pages that will be seen by
anyone who does not have direct access to the file-server. Indeed,
it is necessary that the user already be connected to the
file-server before attempting to look at the Web page. Your Web
server will provide neither access nor the connection. However, it
is possible to create a Web page that contains scripts to establish
the connection to the file-server for users who have existing
access priveleges; such a Web page must be viewed by a user before
attempting to view a page that requires the connection.

On my own PC
file:///C:/WINDOWS/desktop/flame.gif
gives me the flame graphic image from my own desktop. On my wife's
PC, however, she would use
file://///DAVID%20PC/WINDOWS/desktop/flame.gif
because, in our household LAN, my PC is named DAVID PC.

--

David E. Ross
<URL:http://www.rossde.com/>

I use Mozilla as my Web browser because I want a browser that
complies with Web standards. See <URL:http://www.mozilla.org/>.
Jul 24 '05 #4

P: n/a
JRS: In article <42***************@nowhere.not>, dated Mon, 27 Jun 2005
17:56:01, seen in news:comp.infosystems.www.authoring.html, David Ross
<no****@nowhere.not> posted :

Use forward slashes (virgules), not back-slashes.


In French, "virgule" is used for the decimal point or comma; and for
part of a semi-colon. In a good English[*] dictionary, it is given as
meaning an old form of comma, a slanting line. Only in a large Webster
do I see it as corresponding unambiguously to a slash or solidus, as
used in writing Lsd (UK currency before 1971).

So I observe that the use of "virgule" as a synonym for slash in an
international newsgroup is not helpful.
[*] Well, with a nod to Alan, although it was manufactured in Greater
East Anglia, its publishers are in Edinburgh, thus not English.

--
John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ?@merlyn.demon.co.uk Turnpike v4.00 IE 4
<URL:http://www.jibbering.com/faq/> JL/RC: FAQ of news:comp.lang.javascript
<URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/js-index.htm> jscr maths, dates, sources.
<URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/> TP/BP/Delphi/jscr/&c, FAQ items, links.
Jul 24 '05 #5

P: n/a
Dr John Stockton wrote:

JRS: In article <42***************@nowhere.not>, dated Mon, 27 Jun 2005
17:56:01, seen in news:comp.infosystems.www.authoring.html, David Ross
<no****@nowhere.not> posted :

Use forward slashes (virgules), not back-slashes.


In French, "virgule" is used for the decimal point or comma; and for
part of a semi-colon. In a good English[*] dictionary, it is given as
meaning an old form of comma, a slanting line. Only in a large Webster
do I see it as corresponding unambiguously to a slash or solidus, as
used in writing Lsd (UK currency before 1971).

So I observe that the use of "virgule" as a synonym for slash in an
international newsgroup is not helpful.

[*] Well, with a nod to Alan, although it was manufactured in Greater
East Anglia, its publishers are in Edinburgh, thus not English.


My Funk & Wagnalls "Standard College Dictionary" (1963) says for
"slash":
7. (printing) A virgule.

It says for "solidus":
1. A gold coin of the Byzantine Empire, first issued under
Constantine and remaining the standard unit of currency during the
Middle Ages, when it was called a bezant.
2. A medieval money of account, equal to 12 denarii.
3. The sign (/) used to divide shillings from pence: 10/6 (10s.
6d.), being originally the long f written for shilling; sometimes
also used instead of a horizontal line to express fractions: 3/4.

Finally, this dictionary says for "virgule":
A slanting line (/) used to indicate two alternatives, as in
and/or, to set off phoneme symbols, etc; also called slash. [<L
virgula, dim. of 'virga' rod]

Before this dictionary was published (back in the time of Noah and
the flood), I had a teacher in high school who strongly warned
against using "and/or". "Or" includes "and", not only in
mathematics but also in the English language. She also advised
that this the symbol was not a "slash" but was properly called a
"virgule".

When I spell-checked this message, "solidus" was not recognized but
"virgule" was. It appears that "solidus" is a Briticism for a
symbol specifically related to money.

--

David E. Ross
<URL:http://www.rossde.com/>

I use Mozilla as my Web browser because I want a browser that
complies with Web standards. See <URL:http://www.mozilla.org/>.
Jul 24 '05 #6

P: n/a
JRS: In article <42***************@nowhere.not>, dated Thu, 30 Jun 2005
12:20:41, seen in news:comp.infosystems.www.authoring.html, David Ross
<no****@nowhere.not> posted :
Dr John Stockton wrote:

JRS: In article <42***************@nowhere.not>, dated Mon, 27 Jun 2005
17:56:01, seen in news:comp.infosystems.www.authoring.html, David Ross
<no****@nowhere.not> posted :
>
>Use forward slashes (virgules), not back-slashes.
In French, "virgule" is used for the decimal point or comma; and for
part of a semi-colon. In a good English[*] dictionary, it is given as
meaning an old form of comma, a slanting line. Only in a large Webster
do I see it as corresponding unambiguously to a slash or solidus, as
used in writing Lsd (UK currency before 1971).

So I observe that the use of "virgule" as a synonym for slash in an
international newsgroup is not helpful.

My Funk & Wagnalls "Standard College Dictionary" (1963) says for
"slash": ... ...


Yes, but that's an American dictionary too, IIRC.

The point is that you must not assume that your local usages, however
well documented locally, are appropriate for an explanation in an
international newsgroup. Use them locally, if you feel it appropriate;
but not internationally. Remember that the majority of those who
communicate in English are non-Americans.

Since the character set in international News is presumed to include the
characters common to the UK & US PC keyboards, you could have
illustrated your meaning so much more clearly by

Use forward slashes ('/'), not back-slashes ('\').

--
John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ??*@merlyn.demon.co.uk Turnpike v4.00 MIME.
Web <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/> - FAQish topics, acronyms, & links.
Check boilerplate spelling -- error is a public sign of incompetence.
Never fully trust an article from a poster who gives no full real name.
Jul 24 '05 #7

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