By using this site, you agree to our updated Privacy Policy and our Terms of Use. Manage your Cookies Settings.
434,711 Members | 2,158 Online
Bytes IT Community
+ Ask a Question
Need help? Post your question and get tips & solutions from a community of 434,711 IT Pros & Developers. It's quick & easy.

Changing background color of a frameset

P: n/a
I'm trying to set the background color of a frameset to black. The
following code doesn't work in either IE 6.0 or Firefox. Any ideas why?

<frameset bgcolor="#000000" frameborder="0" border="0" cols="240,*">

<frame name="links" scrolling="no" noresize target="contents" src="">

<frameset bgcolor="#000000" frameborder="0" border="0" rows="135,*">

<frame name="topbanner" scrolling="no" src="">

<frame name="main" scrolling="auto" src="">

</frameset>

I know some people don't like framesets, but I need them for this particular
page. Thanks for any ideas on why.

Jul 24 '05 #1
Share this Question
Share on Google+
6 Replies


P: n/a
Nancy Carter wrote:
I'm trying to set the background color of a frameset to black. The
following code doesn't work in either IE 6.0 or Firefox. Any ideas why?

<frameset bgcolor="#000000" frameborder="0" border="0" cols="240,*">
Well:

(a) Your markup is invalid
http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/present/frames.html#h-16.2.1

and:
(b) Frames don't have background colours, they contain documents, elements
of which may have background colours.
I know some people don't like framesets, but I need them for this
particular page.


Given that one of your frames is named "topbanner", that seems rather
unlikely (at least from the point of view of the end user).

--
David Dorward <http://blog.dorward.me.uk/> <http://dorward.me.uk/>
Home is where the ~/.bashrc is
Jul 24 '05 #2

P: n/a
I have seen the bgcolor attribute used with framesets, as I did; perhaps
this is legacy now. The reason I need the frameset to have its own
background color is because the background color of the pages is set to
black. That means the user sees a disconcerting field of gray (in IE) or
white (in Firefox) before the other pages load. If I can set the background
color of the frameset to black, then the user sees a field of black, rather
than the disconcerting gray or white background.

Any other ideas would be most appreciated.

"David Dorward" <do*****@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:d8******************@news.demon.co.uk...
Nancy Carter wrote:
I'm trying to set the background color of a frameset to black. The
following code doesn't work in either IE 6.0 or Firefox. Any ideas why?

<frameset bgcolor="#000000" frameborder="0" border="0" cols="240,*">


Well:

(a) Your markup is invalid
http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/present/frames.html#h-16.2.1

and:
(b) Frames don't have background colours, they contain documents, elements
of which may have background colours.
I know some people don't like framesets, but I need them for this
particular page.


Given that one of your frames is named "topbanner", that seems rather
unlikely (at least from the point of view of the end user).

--
David Dorward <http://blog.dorward.me.uk/> <http://dorward.me.uk/>
Home is where the ~/.bashrc is

Jul 24 '05 #3

P: n/a
Nancy Carter wrote:

Please don't top post.
http://www.faqs.org/rfcs/rfc1855.html
http://www.allmyfaqs.com/faq.pl?How_to_post
I have seen the bgcolor attribute used with framesets, as I did; perhaps
this is legacy now.


No, just non-standard rubbish.

--
David Dorward <http://blog.dorward.me.uk/> <http://dorward.me.uk/>
Home is where the ~/.bashrc is
Jul 24 '05 #4

P: n/a
If it's non-standard but still viable, then how do I make it work? My
problem is that I've inherited a very large, very old website with a lot of
framesets, and we don't have the resources right now to replace all of them,
so I'm trying to make do with what I've inherited. If I can set the frame
background to black, then it will help while we transition all the pages to
CSS.

Thanks again for any help.
"David Dorward" <do*****@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:d8*******************@news.demon.co.uk...
Nancy Carter wrote:

Please don't top post.
http://www.faqs.org/rfcs/rfc1855.html
http://www.allmyfaqs.com/faq.pl?How_to_post
I have seen the bgcolor attribute used with framesets, as I did; perhaps
this is legacy now.


No, just non-standard rubbish.

--
David Dorward <http://blog.dorward.me.uk/> <http://dorward.me.uk/>
Home is where the ~/.bashrc is

Jul 24 '05 #5

P: n/a
On Fri, 17 Jun 2005 16:29:16 -0400, "Nancy Carter"
<nc*****@spamfree.com> wrote:
If it's non-standard but still viable, then how do I make it work?


Just make up some random attributes and use them.
Or sacrifice a chicken to it. Do whatever you want - if you aren't
interested in doing it right, then your new random rubbish is as good as
old legacy random rubbish.

Jul 24 '05 #6

P: n/a


Nancy Carter wrote:
I have seen the bgcolor attribute used with framesets, as I did; perhaps
this is legacy now. The reason I need the frameset to have its own
background color is because the background color of the pages is set to
black. That means the user sees a disconcerting field of gray (in IE) or
white (in Firefox) before the other pages load. If I can set the background
color of the frameset to black, then the user sees a field of black, rather
than the disconcerting gray or white background.

Any other ideas would be most appreciated.

How is seeing a neutral color prior to the page loading disconcerting,
considering that this is normal behavior for web browsers?

I think you may be using 'disconcerting' to mean 'offends my personal
sense of aesthetics' or 'fails to fill my obsessive need to control
every aspect of the user's brower's presentation of my page'. Have any
*users* of the page reported that they find the momentary appearance of
a white or grey field 'disconcerting'? Or do they recognize it for a
normal step in the loading of a webpage, which is what I would expect
from any user who had used a web browser regularly.

A problem that causes no one any problems, is no problem at all.

Andrew

Jul 24 '05 #7

This discussion thread is closed

Replies have been disabled for this discussion.