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Design for 40" LCD?

P: n/a
Public deployment LCD is a whole new device platform to learn about.
Putting a 40" LCD into a hotel lobby or an airport for example has let us
say 'issues' ;-)

Preventing backlight burn-in, determining maximum readable font size at
1280x, maximun lines of text at 1280x or if 1280x should even be used and so
on.

Are there any 'Best Practice' or usability documents you may know of?

<%= Clinton Gallagher
Jul 24 '05 #1
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8 Replies


P: n/a
clintonG wrote:
Public deployment LCD is a whole new device platform to learn about.
Putting a 40" LCD into a hotel lobby or an airport for example has let us
say 'issues' ;-)

Preventing backlight burn-in, determining maximum readable font size at
1280x, maximun lines of text at 1280x or if 1280x should even be used and so
on.

Are there any 'Best Practice' or usability documents you may know of?


Nothing I know of. If you are designing for that particular interface,
then, by all means use it's native resolution with the design taking
advantage of the *known* size. I'd think nothing wrong with designing
pages for an intranet where I *knew* that everyone had a 17" flat screen
set at 1024x768 and all always used full screen.

The only reason for flexible design is that it is rarely, if ever known
for certain what device, resolution, window size, font ... is in use.

Now, if you're trying to design pages for that interface and you want it
to work on the www, then you're back at square one. My advice would be
to not try to display www pages, but to have separate designs for those
devices.

--
Stan McCann "Uncle Pirate" http://stanmccann.us/pirate.html
Webmaster/Computer Center Manager, NMSU at Alamogordo
Coordinator, Tularosa Basin Chapter, ABATE of NM; AMA#758681; COBB
'94 1500 Vulcan (now wrecked) :( http://motorcyclefun.org/Dcp_2068c.jpg
A zest for living must include a willingness to die. - R.A. Heinlein
Jul 24 '05 #2

P: n/a
"clintonG" <cs*********@REMOVETHISTEXTmetromilwaukee.com> wrote:
Public deployment LCD is a whole new device platform to learn
about. Putting a 40" LCD into a hotel lobby or an airport for
example has let us say 'issues' ;-)
Are they really that different from "issues" that we have with any
particular device? The crucial question is, "who are 'we'?". That is,
this an authoring question, or something else?
Preventing backlight burn-in, determining maximum readable font
size at 1280x, maximun lines of text at 1280x or if 1280x should
even be used and so on.
The devices should, of course, run browsers that are suited for the
device. This could be a special-purpose browser, or a common browser
with suitable settings (including settings you can do in a user style
sheet). Then all Web pages will work on it, unless they have been
specifically designed device and browser depending for some different
environments. And even then, something can usually be presented,
especially if the browser has a mode that overrides presentational
markup and style sheets on Web pages (at least partially). Actually it
would be a good idea to have a collection of simple buttons that turn
off different settings, e.g. font size settings on pages.

Designing pages for a particular device type is a dead end, and
off-topic in this group.
Are there any 'Best Practice' or usability documents you may know
of?


The best practice is to design HTML documents so that they can be
viewed or otherwise accessed on any device and to design and configure
browsers so that they display well-designed documents well, according
to the specifics of the device.

--
Yucca, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
Pages about Web authoring: http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/www.html

Jul 24 '05 #3

P: n/a

"Jukka K. Korpela" <jk******@cs.tut.fi> wrote in message
news:Xn*****************************@193.229.0.31. ..
"clintonG" <cs*********@REMOVETHISTEXTmetromilwaukee.com> wrote:
Public deployment LCD is a whole new device platform to learn
about. Putting a 40" LCD into a hotel lobby or an airport for
example has let us say 'issues' ;-)


Are they really that different from "issues" that we have with any
particular device? The crucial question is, "who are 'we'?". That is,
this an authoring question, or something else?

<snip>

I agree with Uncle Pirate. clintonG has a unique situation in that there is
only one device his/her work will be viewed on. So build for what views best
on the 40" LCD. Be sure to give the users the option to change font size.
I'm curious about the project, since I have a customer wanting to do the
same thing for a hospital lobby. Have you found many resources on the www
relating to your project? I haven't begun researching it yet.

Carla
Jul 24 '05 #4

P: n/a
"c.thornquist" <c.**********@insightbb.com> wrote:
I agree with Uncle Pirate.
Then why did you send a followup to my message and quote me?
Quoting the opinion you comment on would be more useful.

You even quoted my question "is this an authoring question, or
something else?", without answering it, and apparently without giving
it any consideration.
clintonG has a unique situation in that
there is only one device his/her work will be viewed on.


Really? Well, doing things the way you seem to be suggesting would
imply that: the work cannot be viewed in another device, and if the
work would have any links (you know, the things that create hypertext
and weave the Web), following them would lead to chaos unless you
restricted yourself to those documents that have also been designed for
that particular device.

That would seem like a non-constructive approach in the modern world
where the device might be replaced next year by a different one, or
some other, different devices would be taken into use in the
organization, or someone tells you next week, as an aside, that the
pages will also be used in the company's extranet or on the WWW.

And surely you wouldn't be authoring for the WWW then? Hence it would
be rather off-topic here.

--
Yucca, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
Pages about Web authoring: http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/www.html

Jul 24 '05 #5

P: n/a
On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 04:52:53 +0000 (UTC), "Jukka K. Korpela"
<jk******@cs.tut.fi> wrote:
Well, doing things the way you seem to be suggesting would
imply that: the work cannot be viewed in another device,


Why is that a problem? This isn't a web application, it's a kiosk
application built out of web technologies.
Jul 24 '05 #6

P: n/a
Andy Dingley <di*****@codesmiths.com> wrote:
Well, doing things the way you seem to be suggesting would imply
that: the work cannot be viewed in another device,


Why is that a problem? This isn't a web application, it's a kiosk
application built out of web technologies.


That's a problem because it's unnecessarily device-dependent. It's
better to design pages as if you were designing for the WWW (partly
because the pages might later be used on the WWW) and to tune the
device(s) so that the documents get rendered well according to the
device's properties.

If it's a kiosk application and the author wants to ignore the aspect I
mentioned, then the issue is _surely_ off-topic here.

--
Yucca, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
Pages about Web authoring: http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/www.html

Jul 24 '05 #7

P: n/a

"Jukka K. Korpela" <jk******@cs.tut.fi> wrote in message
news:Xn*****************************@193.229.0.31. ..
"c.thornquist" <c.**********@insightbb.com> wrote:
I agree with Uncle Pirate.
Then why did you send a followup to my message and quote me?
Quoting the opinion you comment on would be more useful.


Probably because I wanted you to expand upon your reply.

You even quoted my question "is this an authoring question, or
something else?", without answering it, and apparently without giving
it any consideration.

I only included it because I didn't want to unnecessarily break up that
paragraph. I'll be more careful with my snipping.
clintonG has a unique situation in that
there is only one device his/her work will be viewed on.


Really? Well, doing things the way you seem to be suggesting would
imply that: the work cannot be viewed in another device,

In my case, for the hospital lobby, it will not be viewed on other devices.
He hasn't followed up with specifics, but his/her project sounded similar to
mine.
and if the
work would have any links (you know, the things that create hypertext
and weave the Web),
Thanks for explaining what a link is;)
following them would lead to chaos unless you
restricted yourself to those documents that have also been designed for
that particular device.

The only links my customer referred to are to a buttons that may give
visitors to the hospital directions to departments at the hospital (Eg which
elevators/halls lead to said department)
That would seem like a non-constructive approach in the modern world
where the device might be replaced next year by a different one, or
some other, different devices would be taken into use in the
organization, or someone tells you next week, as an aside, that the
pages will also be used in the company's extranet or on the WWW.

This is a type of kiosk to give directions. It will have no internet access.
And surely you wouldn't be authoring for the WWW then? Hence it would
be rather off-topic here.


I didn't know authoring here was restricted to that for the WWW, but it's
evident in the newsgroup name. Sorry.

Carla
Jul 24 '05 #8

P: n/a

"Jukka K. Korpela" <jk******@cs.tut.fi> wrote in message
news:Xn*****************************@193.229.0.31. ..
Andy Dingley <di*****@codesmiths.com> wrote:
Well, doing things the way you seem to be suggesting would imply
that: the work cannot be viewed in another device,


Why is that a problem? This isn't a web application, it's a kiosk
application built out of web technologies.


That's a problem because it's unnecessarily device-dependent. It's
better to design pages as if you were designing for the WWW (partly
because the pages might later be used on the WWW) and to tune the
device(s) so that the documents get rendered well according to the
device's properties.

If it's a kiosk application and the author wants to ignore the aspect I
mentioned, then the issue is _surely_ off-topic here.

--
Yucca, http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/
Pages about Web authoring: http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/www.html


Well, I haven't fallen off the face of the earth as it may have seemed.

Anyway, the application is a web application that will run on XP Pro IIS 5
and as requirements currently specify will display content both static and
dynamic with certain types of content coming from "the web" noting as the
project is currently defined it is intended to be read-only (no
interactivity) and will be displayed on a Sony 42" LCD. The only thing
relevant to a kiosk would be the browser configuration mode. Any tips on
"browser kiosk mode?"

One thing I have noticed watching TV on the large screens. The advertisers
use sans serif fonts significantly over-sized and weighted. Apparently
readability is an issue for LCD displays. I've had some confirmation from
others who author using desktop LCD in the 15"-19" range.

<%= Clinton Gallagher

Jul 24 '05 #9

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