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Representing 8.5x11 in HTML

I would like to create a table in HTML that represents a letter on a
standard size sheet of paper. But of course, smaller so the width fits on
the screen.

How do I code an HTML table to represent an 8.5 x 11 sheet of paper? What
would the screen measurements be in pixels?

--
============================
- Dave
http://members.cox.net/grundage/
Jul 23 '05 #1
16 28301

"Dave" <da**@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:qD6Xc.60393$wo.2975@okepread06...
I would like to create a table in HTML that represents a letter on a
standard size sheet of paper. But of course, smaller so the width fits on
the screen.

How do I code an HTML table to represent an 8.5 x 11 sheet of paper? What
would the screen measurements be in pixels?


Since every screen has a different number of pixels per inch, you don't do
this. You can try using CSS to absolutely position each element of your
letter directly in inches, but the results may or may not be satisfactory.
Forget altogether about trying to do this with tables.

Jul 23 '05 #2
On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 15:28:08 -0500, Dave <da**@yahoo.com> wrote:
I would like to create a table in HTML that represents a letter on a
standard size sheet of paper. But of course, smaller so the width fits on
the screen.

How do I code an HTML table to represent an 8.5 x 11 sheet of paper? What
would the screen measurements be in pixels?


What's the width of the viewport? Do you know? A script can tell you the
screen width, but not the viewport of the browser, it could be any value.

Without that piece of information, you cannot find the value 1 5/17 larger
to use as the height. Without that value, you cannot format the elements
within the letter shape with any accuracy. As that value is unknown, your
task is impossible.

Best option is to create an image of the letter. Use the longdesc
attribute and an accompanying text link pointing to a page giving a text
version of the content, with no attempt to format as you propose.

Jul 23 '05 #3
Dave wrote:
I would like to create a table in HTML that represents a letter on a
standard size sheet of paper. But of course, smaller so the width fits on
the screen.

The best you can hope to do is create a div section whose
width-to-height ratio is 8.5/11, and scale all the content to fit. It
will, of course, be unreadable but would look like a 8.5 x 11 layout.
You'd be better off creating an image or a PDF.

--
jmm dash list (at) sohnen-moe (dot) com
(Remove .AXSPAMGN for email)
Jul 23 '05 #4
On Wed, 25 Aug 2004, Dave wrote:
I would like to create a table in HTML that represents a letter on a
standard size sheet of paper.
The standard size sheet of paper is 210*mm × 297*mm and is called "A4":
http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/iso-paper.html
an 8.5 x 11 sheet of paper


What??

--
Top-posting.
What's the most irritating thing on Usenet?
Jul 23 '05 #5
Andreas Prilop <nh******@rrzn-user.uni-hannover.de> wrote:
On Wed, 25 Aug 2004, Dave wrote:
I would like to create a table in HTML that represents a letter on a
standard size sheet of paper.


The standard size sheet of paper is 210*mm × 297*mm and is called "A4":
http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/iso-paper.html
an 8.5 x 11 sheet of paper


That's the standard "letter" page size in the US. Then there's "legal"
size, 8.5 x 14. Inches, of course,

--
Harlan Messinger
Remove the first dot from my e-mail address.
Veuillez ōter le premier point de mon adresse de courriel.
Jul 23 '05 #6
On Thu, 26 Aug 2004 14:20:35 +0200, Andreas Prilop
<nh******@rrzn-user.uni-hannover.de> wrote:
On Wed, 25 Aug 2004, Dave wrote:
I would like to create a table in HTML that represents a letter on a
standard size sheet of paper.


The standard size sheet of paper is 210*mm × 297*mm and is called "A4":
http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/iso-paper.html
an 8.5 x 11 sheet of paper


What??


We ugly Americans like to use these arcane measurements and non-standard
sizes. But hey, you like our hamburgers and our blue jeans. ;)
Jul 23 '05 #7
JRS: In article <Pine.GSO.4.44.0408261417001.3102-100000@s5b004>, dated
Thu, 26 Aug 2004 14:20:35, seen in news:comp.infosystems.www.authoring.h
tml, Andreas Prilop <nh******@rrzn-user.uni-hannover.de> posted :
On Wed, 25 Aug 2004, Dave wrote:
I would like to create a table in HTML that represents a letter on a
standard size sheet of paper.


The standard size sheet of paper is 210*mm × 297*mm and is called "A4":
http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/iso-paper.html
an 8.5 x 11 sheet of paper


What??


That's in Imperial units; they keep them in case they ever get an
Empire.

But here the most frequently-used sizes are 100 mm * 122 mm and 600 mm *
720 mm approximately.

--
© John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ??*@merlyn.demon.co.uk Turnpike v4.00 MIME. ©
Web <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/> - w. FAQish topics, links, acronyms
Dates - miscdate.htm Year 2000 - date2000.htm Critical Dates - critdate.htm
Euro computing - eurocash.htm UK Y2k mini-FAQ: y2k_mfaq.txt Don't Mail News
Jul 23 '05 #8
Practical solution:

While printing, Internet Explorer thinks that there are 800 screen pixels
between left and right side of print page.
So if you want sort of preview of your printout put in your
document <div> or <table> sized to w:800px h:1000px (or little less as of
margins) .
This will represent "printing page". Being printed this element will occupy
whole page.

Gecko seems uses the same scale.

And sure our http://blocknote.net behave this way also.

Andrew Fedoniouk.
http://terrainformatica.com
"Dave" <da**@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:qD6Xc.60393$wo.2975@okepread06...
I would like to create a table in HTML that represents a letter on a
standard size sheet of paper. But of course, smaller so the width fits on
the screen.

How do I code an HTML table to represent an 8.5 x 11 sheet of paper? What
would the screen measurements be in pixels?

--
============================
- Dave
http://members.cox.net/grundage/

Jul 23 '05 #9
On Thu, 26 Aug 2004 20:20:36 +0100, Dr John Stockton
<sp**@merlyn.demon.co.uk> wrote:
Andreas Prilop <nh******@rrzn-user.uni-hannover.de> posted :
On Wed, 25 Aug 2004, Dave wrote:
an 8.5 x 11 sheet of paper What??

That's in Imperial units; they keep them in case they ever get an
Empire.


Haw haw. What's scary is that our minority-selected leader seems to be
trying to do just that...
But here the most frequently-used sizes are 100 mm * 122 mm and 600 mm *
720 mm approximately.


Mm? As in "Mm, this McDonald's hamburger is great!" ;)

(just kidding y'all)
Jul 23 '05 #10
"Neal" <ne*****@yahoo.com> a écrit dans le message de
news:op**************@news.individual.net
We ugly Americans like to use these arcane measurements and
non-standard sizes. But hey, you like our hamburgers and our blue
jeans. ;)


:)

Maybe it's time to tell you that, well, hambergers... we don't like them so
mutch.
And I was told that jeans were invented in France, in Nīmes (Jean de
Nīmes -> Jeans)

Jul 23 '05 #11

"Pierre Goiffon" <pg******@nowhere.invalid> wrote in message
news:41***********************@news.free.fr...
"Neal" <ne*****@yahoo.com> a écrit dans le message de
news:op**************@news.individual.net
We ugly Americans like to use these arcane measurements and
non-standard sizes. But hey, you like our hamburgers and our blue
jeans. ;)
:)

Maybe it's time to tell you that, well, hambergers... we don't like them

so mutch.
And I was told that jeans were invented in France, in Nīmes (Jean de
Nīmes -> Jeans)


You're combining two derivations that I'm aware of:

"de Nīmes" >> "denim"
"Gźnes" (the French name for Genoa/Genova) >> "jeans"

The material was of European origin, but the eponymous trousers were
invented by Levi Strauss in California during the Gold Rush.

Jul 23 '05 #12

"Dr John Stockton" <sp**@merlyn.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
news:Tb**************@merlyn.demon.co.uk...
JRS: In article <Pine.GSO.4.44.0408261417001.3102-100000@s5b004>, dated
Thu, 26 Aug 2004 14:20:35, seen in news:comp.infosystems.www.authoring.h
tml, Andreas Prilop <nh******@rrzn-user.uni-hannover.de> posted :
On Wed, 25 Aug 2004, Dave wrote:
I would like to create a table in HTML that represents a letter on a
standard size sheet of paper.


The standard size sheet of paper is 210 mm × 297 mm and is called "A4":
http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/iso-paper.html
an 8.5 x 11 sheet of paper


What??


That's in Imperial units; they keep them in case they ever get an
Empire.

But here the most frequently-used sizes are 100 mm * 122 mm and 600 mm *
720 mm approximately.


What are those the sizes of? I was thinking the former might be rolling
papers, but those would be 100 mm long and much less wide than 122 mm, no?

Jul 23 '05 #13
"Pierre Goiffon" <pg******@nowhere.invalid> wrote in message news:<41***********************@news.free.fr>...
"Neal" <ne*****@yahoo.com> a écrit dans le message de
news:op**************@news.individual.net
We ugly Americans like to use these arcane measurements and
non-standard sizes. But hey, you like our hamburgers and our blue
jeans. ;)


Maybe it's time to tell you that, well, hambergers... we don't like them so
mutch.
And I was told that jeans were invented in France, in Nīmes (Jean de
Nīmes -> Jeans)


Weren't hamburgers invented in Hamburg, Germany?

--
Dan
Jul 23 '05 #14
On Fri, 27 Aug 2004 10:30:31 -0400, Harlan Messinger
<h.*********@comcast.net> wrote:
"Dr John Stockton" <sp**@merlyn.demon.co.uk> wrote in message
news:Tb**************@merlyn.demon.co.uk...
But here the most frequently-used sizes are 100 mm * 122 mm and 600 mm *
720 mm approximately.


What are those the sizes of? I was thinking the former might be rolling
papers, but those would be 100 mm long and much less wide than 122 mm,
no?


They roll 'em big over there.

Jul 23 '05 #15
JRS: In article <2p************@uni-berlin.de>, dated Fri, 27 Aug 2004
10:30:31, seen in news:comp.infosystems.www.authoring.html, Harlan
Messinger <h.*********@comcast.net> posted :
But here the most frequently-used sizes are 100 mm * 122 mm and 600 mm *
720 mm approximately.


What are those the sizes of? I was thinking the former might be rolling
papers, but those would be 100 mm long and much less wide than 122 mm, no?


Toilet paper and (broadsheet) newspaper.

--
© John Stockton, Surrey, UK. ?@merlyn.demon.co.uk / ??*********@physics.org ©
Web <URL:http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/> - FAQish topics, acronyms, & links.
Correct <= 4-line sig. separator as above, a line precisely "-- " (SoRFC1036)
Do not Mail News to me. Before a reply, quote with ">" or "> " (SoRFC1036)
Jul 23 '05 #16
Tim
Somebody unknown wrote:
But here the most frequently-used sizes are 100 mm * 122 mm and 600 mm *
720 mm approximately.

Harlan Messinger <h.*********@comcast.net>
What are those the sizes of? I was thinking the former might be rolling
papers, but those would be 100 mm long and much less wide than 122 mm, no?

Dr John Stockton <sp**@merlyn.demon.co.uk> posted:
Toilet paper and (broadsheet) newspaper.


If you'd said tabloid, I'd have said there's no real difference between
them. ;-)

I was somewhat surprised to see that there was an ISO standard for loo
paper (while looking up paper standards not long ago). I was amused to see
the latest version of the Gimp include it in the presets for new files. I
can't imagine what sort of printer you'd use, though...

--
If you insist on e-mailing me, use the reply-to address (it's real but
temporary). But please reply to the group, like you're supposed to.

This message was sent without a virus, please delete some files yourself.
Jul 23 '05 #17

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