473,549 Members | 2,591 Online
Bytes | Software Development & Data Engineering Community
+ Post

Home Posts Topics Members FAQ

<em> vs.<i> and <strong> vs. <b>

I've started cleaning up my HTML and implementing CSS. So far I've
used FrontPage, but am switching over to DreamWeaver.

Reading a bit on W3Schools.com and W3.org I see there are a lot
of HTML code I never even knew existed. Among these are <em> and
<strong>. What's the difference between these two and <i> and <b>?

--
Torbjørn Pettersen
Editor/Webmaster
FantaFiction

www.fantafiction.com
Jul 20 '05 #1
129 64457
Torbjørn Pettersen wrote:

<em> and <strong>. What's the difference between these two
and <i> and <b>?


<i> carries no semantic meaning beyond "make this italicized"; if
italics are not available, there is no fallback rendering that I'm aware of

<b> carries no semantic meaning beyond "make this bold"; if bold is not
available, there is no fallback rendering that I'm aware of

<em> means emphasized text; certain browsers render emphasized text in
italics, though this is not required

<strong> means strongly emphasized text; certain browsers render
strongly emphasized text in bold, though this is not required

--
Brian (remove "invalid" from my address to email me)
http://www.tsmchughs.com/
Jul 20 '05 #2
Torbjørn Pettersen wrote:

<em> and <strong>. What's the difference between these two
and <i> and <b>?


<i> carries no semantic meaning beyond "make this italicized"; if
italics are not available, there is no fallback rendering that I'm aware of

<b> carries no semantic meaning beyond "make this bold"; if bold is not
available, there is no fallback rendering that I'm aware of

<em> means emphasized text; certain browsers render emphasized text in
italics, though this is not required

<strong> means strongly emphasized text; certain browsers render
strongly emphasized text in bold, though this is not required

--
Brian (remove "invalid" from my address to email me)
http://www.tsmchughs.com/
Jul 20 '05 #3
Torbjørn Pettersen <tpe AT broadpark DOT no> wrote:
Reading a bit on W3Schools.com and W3.org I see there are a lot
of HTML code I never even knew existed. Among these are <em> and
<strong>. What's the difference between these two and <i> and <b>?


Using <i> or <b> doesn't say anything about *why* you want italics or
boldface. It specifies only the presentation that you want.

In contrast, using <em>, <strong>, <cite>, <var>, etc. specifies a
structural meaning. And it's easier for browsers (or style sheet authors)
to use some other presentation for the structure when the typical default
presentation is inappropriate (or undesired).
--
Darin McGrew, mc****@stanford alumni.org, http://www.rahul.net/mcgrew/
Web Design Group, da***@htmlhelp. com, http://www.HTMLHelp.com/

"Never ask a barber whether you need a haircut."
Jul 20 '05 #4
Torbjørn Pettersen <tpe AT broadpark DOT no> wrote:
Reading a bit on W3Schools.com and W3.org I see there are a lot
of HTML code I never even knew existed. Among these are <em> and
<strong>. What's the difference between these two and <i> and <b>?


Using <i> or <b> doesn't say anything about *why* you want italics or
boldface. It specifies only the presentation that you want.

In contrast, using <em>, <strong>, <cite>, <var>, etc. specifies a
structural meaning. And it's easier for browsers (or style sheet authors)
to use some other presentation for the structure when the typical default
presentation is inappropriate (or undesired).
--
Darin McGrew, mc****@stanford alumni.org, http://www.rahul.net/mcgrew/
Web Design Group, da***@htmlhelp. com, http://www.HTMLHelp.com/

"Never ask a barber whether you need a haircut."
Jul 20 '05 #5
"Torbjørn Pettersen" <tpe AT broadpark DOT no> wrote:
Reading a bit on W3Schools.com and W3.org I see there are a lot
of HTML code I never even knew existed. Among these are <em> and
<strong>. What's the difference between these two and <i> and <b>?


<i> and <b> are purely presentational. How do you render "bold" using a
audio output browser? <em> and <strong> have meaning.

--
David Dorward <http://blog.dorward.me .uk/> <http://dorward.me.uk/>
Jul 20 '05 #6
"Torbjørn Pettersen" <tpe AT broadpark DOT no> wrote:
Reading a bit on W3Schools.com and W3.org I see there are a lot
of HTML code I never even knew existed. Among these are <em> and
<strong>. What's the difference between these two and <i> and <b>?


<i> and <b> are purely presentational. How do you render "bold" using a
audio output browser? <em> and <strong> have meaning.

--
David Dorward <http://blog.dorward.me .uk/> <http://dorward.me.uk/>
Jul 20 '05 #7
Darin McGrew wrote...
Using <i> or <b> doesn't say anything about *why* you want italics or
boldface. It specifies only the presentation that you want.

In contrast, using <em>, <strong>, <cite>, <var>, etc. specifies a
structural meaning. And it's easier for browsers (or style sheet authors)
to use some other presentation for the structure when the typical default
presentation is inappropriate (or undesired).


So, if I understand this right; <b> and <i> should be used purely when
I want text styles like a bold headline or italic foot notes?

I'm still not sure if I understand when and where to use <em> and <strong>.
Since English is not my mother tongue, I have some trouble understanding
the finer things here. ;-)

--
Torbjørn Pettersen
Editor/Webmaster
FantaFiction

www.fantafiction.com
Jul 20 '05 #8
Darin McGrew wrote...
Using <i> or <b> doesn't say anything about *why* you want italics or
boldface. It specifies only the presentation that you want.

In contrast, using <em>, <strong>, <cite>, <var>, etc. specifies a
structural meaning. And it's easier for browsers (or style sheet authors)
to use some other presentation for the structure when the typical default
presentation is inappropriate (or undesired).


So, if I understand this right; <b> and <i> should be used purely when
I want text styles like a bold headline or italic foot notes?

I'm still not sure if I understand when and where to use <em> and <strong>.
Since English is not my mother tongue, I have some trouble understanding
the finer things here. ;-)

--
Torbjørn Pettersen
Editor/Webmaster
FantaFiction

www.fantafiction.com
Jul 20 '05 #9

"Torbjørn Pettersen" <tpe AT broadpark DOT no> wrote in message
news:40******** @news.broadpark .no...
Darin McGrew wrote...
Using <i> or <b> doesn't say anything about *why* you want italics or
boldface. It specifies only the presentation that you want.

In contrast, using <em>, <strong>, <cite>, <var>, etc. specifies a
structural meaning. And it's easier for browsers (or style sheet authors) to use some other presentation for the structure when the typical default presentation is inappropriate (or undesired).
So, if I understand this right; <b> and <i> should be used purely when
I want text styles like a bold headline or italic foot notes?


It's better not to use them at all. It is best to use HTML to describe the
function of the different parts of a document--for example, to say, "this
text should be emphasized"--and to use CSS when you want to ask the browser
to provide an appearance that might be different from its default. On most
browsers the default appearance for <em> probably IS italic, and bold for
<strong>.

I'm still not sure if I understand when and where to use <em> and <strong>. Since English is not my mother tongue, I have some trouble understanding
the finer things here. ;-)

--
Torbjørn Pettersen
Editor/Webmaster
FantaFiction

www.fantafiction.com


Jul 20 '05 #10

This thread has been closed and replies have been disabled. Please start a new discussion.

By using Bytes.com and it's services, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

To disable or enable advertisements and analytics tracking please visit the manage ads & tracking page.